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Old 05-16-2014, 05:46 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by rodwha View Post
SWMBO and I were just talking about trying the food processor instead. Would it do a better job of "crushing" the wheat berries instead of pulverizing them?
I haven't been able to do much damage to dry wheat berries without either a proper mill or cooking them first.
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:44 PM   #22
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Those dry wheat berries are hard, quite a bit harder than malted barley and rye seems to be even harder. I hand crank my Corona style mill and I can really tell the difference when I add unmalted wheat or rye.

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Old 05-17-2014, 08:04 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodwha View Post
I'll just post it.

4.8 gal batch

4 lbs wheat DME
1.5 lbs honey malt
1.5 lbs honey (FO)
0.4 oz Willamette (4.7%) @ 50/15 mins
WLP 320

1.052/1.015
4.9% ABV
15 IBU's
7 SRM

The FG was much lower at 1.007. It was certainly much higher than 4.9% ABV.

I used the whole 4 oz cherry extract from MoreBeer at bottling. You need to pour 1/2-2/3 of a bottle, stir, and try it to make sure it's not overpowering, and add until satisfied.

I hadn't used wheat berries, but you could certainly sub out some DME for 2-row and wheat berries.

Not sure if is like a cherry beer. I wonder if I could add some strawberries when it's about done fermenting. That might be good!


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Old 05-17-2014, 09:14 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by 6footbrewery View Post
So today I went to a new store. I found some wheat that I think would be great in a beer.
Questions:
First can I use it?
Next how do I use it?
Also do any of you have a recipe that I could use?
Here is what I found
Attachment 199480Attachment 199481Attachment 199482
I would really like to use one of them if not all of them in a beer. Please let me know what you guys think.
Thanks.


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I've been making Shipwrecked Saison, or derivatives of it according to what I had on hand, since I started brewing last year. A couple of times I substituted hard red winter wheat for the 20% malted wheat in the original recipe, and it worked fine; apparently malted barley has enzymes to burn. I'm willing to bet I could get away with up to a 50/50 mix of malted barley and unmalted wheat....

Of course, I'm guessing. I'm sure someone reading this has actually tried it.
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Old 05-17-2014, 11:41 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troy2000 View Post
I've been making Shipwrecked Saison, or derivatives of it according to what I had on hand, since I started brewing last year. A couple of times I substituted hard red winter wheat for the 20% malted wheat in the original recipe, and it worked fine; apparently malted barley has enzymes to burn. I'll willing to bet I could get away with up to a 50/50 mix of malted barley and unmalted wheat....

Of course, I'm guessing. I'm sure someone reading this has actually tried it.
I've done a 60/40 unmalted wheat to malted barley mix and it converts fine. From my calculation based on the diastatic power of 2 row barley, it could convert up to 65%.
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Old 05-17-2014, 12:12 PM   #26
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As stpug said, boiling (or steaming) them like rice is one of the best methods to soften the wheat and rye berries, so the malt enzymes can get to them later. They'll swell up, and when they're mushy (like thin porridge) they can be added to the mash. Don't forget to add a few handfuls of rice hulls, depending on how much wheat or rye you're mashing, if you want it to lauter at all. If it doesn't lauter, add more rice hulls and stir it up really well again.

Food processors do a very poor job on grinding grains. It may even damage it. I know blenders are different but I once melted out the bearing in a blender carafe trying to grind coffee. I was desperate and not thinking straight.

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Old 05-18-2014, 06:44 AM   #27
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As stpug said, boiling (or steaming) them like rice is one of the best methods to soften the wheat and rye berries, so the malt enzymes can get to them later. They'll swell up, and when they're mushy (like thin porridge) they can be added to the mash. Don't forget to add a few handfuls of rice hulls, depending on how much wheat or rye you're mashing, if you want it to lauter at all. If it doesn't lauter, add more rice hulls and stir it up really well again.

Food processors do a very poor job on grinding grains. It may even damage it. I know blenders are different but I once melted out the bearing in a blender carafe trying to grind coffee. I was desperate and not thinking straight.
I assume that means you hadn't had your morning coffee yet...

I once folded a small pile of coffee beans into a dish towel, and attacked them with a waffle-headed framing hammer. It worked. But it took a while to coax some of the coffee out of the cloth.
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Old 05-24-2014, 06:09 PM   #28
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White wheat is what's referred to as soft wheat. It's going to be sweeter and more dough like with aroma and flavor. Most all wheat beers use white wheat. Red wheat is a hard kernel wheat and is often used for bread baking. It will depart a bready character and has a darker color than white wheat when brewing. Red wheat is used in 3 Floyd's Gumballhead and is a good example of the taste, color and aroma it will depart. I like red wheat in American style wheats. White wheat is great in Belgian styles. Not much difference overall though. 50/50 mix with either 2 row barley or pilsner malt gets you a good wheat beer.


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