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Old 11-09-2008, 03:20 AM   #21
ILurvTheWhiskey
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Sorry about the possible infection. I recently had stout that got Acetobacter and after bottling underneath it you could barely taste any difference.

To answer your question on how to bottle it, try a racking cane (NORTHERN BREWER: Siphoning Equipment), which is a hard rigid L shape piece of plastic attached to a plastic hose that you put into the carboy and suck the beer out with (not your mouth, try looking up 'siphoning beer') into your bottles or secondary.

Best of luck.

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Old 11-09-2008, 03:25 AM   #22
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One other thing. First time I had an infection, I siphoned all of my beer into a 5 gallon pot, put the lid on and boiled for about 5 minutes.

After it finished I added 2 pounds of dry malt extract and repitched some more yeast (as the boiling kills the yeast). It then set for another week.

I then bottled it and it tasted ok. I think it lost some of its alcohol when I boiled it, and it probably screwed with its flavor, but it was drinkable.

Has anyone else ever done this? If so, other than the negatives I pointed out, and the potential to waste a fine/perfect beer, are there any other considerations or why this may have been a definite no? I was thinking pasteurize.

Hope this helps.

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Old 11-09-2008, 03:26 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Quikfeet509 View Post
Most "anti-bacterial" soaps really don't have much killing power at all. Instead the soaps make it difficult for the bacteria to adhere to surfaces.
I did a makeshift experiment in micro lab a lifetime ago where I compared the effect of antibacterial soap, regular soap, and distilled water in order to see how each one affected an infected chip with and without agitation.
Distilled water with agitation inhibited growth better than antibacterial soap without agitation. True story.
Get a sanitizer. Most antibacterial soaps are just hype.
I bought a 1 gallon jug of DIAL antibacterial soap at sams. After 6 months, it had mold growing on it, and bacteria growing in it!
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Old 11-09-2008, 05:45 AM   #24
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I bought a 1 gallon jug of DIAL antibacterial soap at sams. After 6 months, it had mold growing on it, and bacteria growing in it!
Same thing happened to me, i bought the big jug at costco and after several months it started turning brown and grew mold.
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Old 11-09-2008, 06:24 AM   #25
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That's wild. Lesson leared/learning.

Well, today the sucker looks like it's going to be a pellicle. Is there any treatment for this or am I bottling for ****s and hoping for the worst? How do I bottle it anyway, it's in a glass carboy.

Sad day.
Transfer to a bottling bucket (assuming you have one), and try to avoid sucking up that top inch or so. As others have said, unless you taste funk, it's probably not bad. I've seen pictures of English yeasts that look oh so nasty, and do all sorts of things you'd never expect to see in healthy brew. A guy posted an image of Whitbread not so long ago that looked like floating islands of cheese with mold growing on them, but it was just fine. In other words, for as sick as his culture looked, there was no mold or bacteria, or Bret, just good old funky Whitbread. The thing to remember: you're not a microbiologist (most of us here aren't), and you really can't diagnose a microbial culture unless the symptoms are screaming obvious.

One thing I've learned over the years with gardening, and now brewing, is something called the neglect technique. Basically, you do everything you're supposed to do, and then neglect it. In other words, don't pop the top on the primary every other day. Prepare your wort, pitch, and leave that lid on for three weeks to a month. Transfer to secondary if required, neglect, then bottle at your leisure. In other words, make sure you have all the basics like a good recipe, good equipment, and good sanitation down, and let the yeast do what it does.

Perhaps one of the greatest epiphanies I've experienced with gardening was the realization that I (or you, or whoever) is not growing the plant, the plant grows itself -- I'm only providing an ideal environment that favors growth. From there, it's the plant's job, and no amount of testing or tweaking will make things any better. In other words, for as obsessive as we want to be, we're not growing yeast, yeast grows itself. We just try to give it that extra advantage with proper preparation.

In other words, don't fix it if it ain't broke, and/or keep it simple.

One thing that caught my attention: if you're using boiling water only as your sterilizer, that probably isn't enough, especially for plastics. In short, a quick soak in boiling water will not kill everything. Be sure that you're sterilizing the instruments you use for the frequent OG samplings as well. If you don't want to spend the money on Star San, bargain brand bleech is (literally) less than a dollar a bottle. Mix it one part to ten parts water, give it a good few minutes contact time with all your instruments, etc etc, and it will kill everything. Just make sure you rinse it all off well, or you'll have one funky brew.
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Last edited by Pelikan; 11-09-2008 at 06:51 PM.
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