Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Liquid vs dry malt extract.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-08-2008, 11:37 PM   #1
JMU_Alumn08
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 49
Default Liquid vs dry malt extract.

Ok so what are the pros and cons associated with liquid malt and dry malt extract? Also, it seems to make sense to use actual malted grains and boil them to create a "pre-boil tea" before adding the extract. How beneficial is this and is there a general rule of thumb for how much actual malted grains to use with extracts?

__________________
JMU_Alumn08 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2008, 11:48 PM   #2
Tenchiro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Tenchiro's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 2,963
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

As long as the extract is fresh you shouldn't see much difference between liquid or dry. Never boil your grains though, you should steep them but you never want to go above about 160°. I generally steep my grains at 155° for 20-30min depending. When choosing grains I don't really try to match them to the malt, more than the style of beer that I want in the end.

__________________
Tenchiro is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2008, 11:52 PM   #3
JMU_Alumn08
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 49
Default

excellent. on top of the extract called for, how much grains (I guess in weight) should you use? I'm assuming too much would screw up your gravity..

__________________
JMU_Alumn08 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-08-2008, 11:57 PM   #4
Tenchiro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Tenchiro's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 2,963
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMU_Alumn08 View Post
excellent. on top of the extract called for, how much grains (I guess in weight) should you use? I'm assuming too much would screw up your gravity..
I generally shoot for 1-1.5# of grains per batch.
__________________
Tenchiro is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2008, 12:31 AM   #5
Tech211
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 140
Default

Freshness is indeed key. If you have doubts that your supplier moves alot of extract, go with the dry. Liquid doesn't stay fresh for as long.

__________________
Tech211 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2008, 12:56 AM   #6
BooneDocks
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Wyandotte, Michigan
Posts: 316
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

At my LHBS, dry is more expensive (about $10 more per batch).

__________________
BooneDocks is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2008, 03:17 AM   #7
Eves
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 380
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

DME is generally more expensive. But then again it takes slightly less DME to equal the same amount of gravity from LME. Also, unlsss you're brewing a ton quickly DME is probably better to handle when in bulk (50+#s). I mean think about having to handle syrup for numerous brews. I think in there are generally more variations of available of LME than DME.

So ultimately it depends on what you're brewing and what is available to you.

__________________
Eves is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-09-2008, 03:20 AM   #8
JMU_Alumn08
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 49
Default

yea the two main concerns for me are freshness/quality of taste and an accurate color. from what I have gathered, it might be a toss up? but to get accurate color with LME I might have to start adding it late. is this not an issue with DME?

__________________
JMU_Alumn08 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2008, 01:26 PM   #9
Homercidal
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 24,396
Liked 2432 Times on 1718 Posts
Likes Given: 1387

Default

I prefer the DME for a couple of reasons.

I like the fact that it is more stable on the shelf and I don't always get to brew when I want.

It's easier to deal with; no worry about turning off the heat when adding, less sticky mess, no digging with spatula to get it all out.

Maybe it's my imagination, but I think that since I've switched to DME, my beers have tasted better. Or maybe I'm just getting better at brewing?

Also I think that if you want a lighter colored beer, the DME can go a bit lighter than LME.

__________________
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-10-2008, 07:14 PM   #10
ifishsum
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 1,457
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMU_Alumn08 View Post
excellent. on top of the extract called for, how much grains (I guess in weight) should you use? I'm assuming too much would screw up your gravity..
That depends - if you're just steeping specialty grains you won't get a large amount of gravity points from them, mostly flavors and colors. Typically steeping recipes call for up to 1-1.5 lbs but it depends on the recipe.

If you're doing a partial mash with base grains as well as specialty grains, then you reduce the amount of extract proportional to the amount of grains you're mashing (and their expected gravity contribution). The ratio I use is 1 lb of grain = .75 lbs LME or .6 lbs DME. As an example, if you have an extract recipe that calls for 6 lbs of LME and you decide to mash 2 lbs of base malt along with your specialty grains, you reduce the LME amount by 1.5 lbs (2 x .75 = 1.5). I usually shoot for a 4-5 lb grain mash because that's what my 2 gallon cooler can handle.

As to the liquid vs dry debate, I prefer bulk liquid extract because it's cheaper and I find it more convenient, I bring my own container and they dispense whatever amount I want for the recipe I'm doing. No measuring for me - all I have to do is dump it into the kettle. They sell a lot of it so I know it's fresh. I'm lucky to have a great LHBS only a couple of miles from me - if I had to order it online or store it though, I'd use dry extract instead - I've not been impressed with canned liquid extract.
__________________
"If you're gonna be an ape, be a hairy one" - Spyder

Primary 2: Edwort's Robust Porter
Secondary 1: LW Pale Ale
Secondary 1: Blackened Soul RIS
Kegged: Dead Guy Ale
Kegged: Rye Pale Ale
Kegged: Haus Pale Ale
Kegged: Nut Brown Ale
Kegged: Afrikan Amber
Kegged: Jock Scott Ale
Kegged: Afrikan Amber
ifishsum is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Subbing liquid malt extract for dry malt extract suhornet84 Extract Brewing 3 09-18-2009 03:43 AM
liquid or dry malt extract, which is better? GregBrews88 Extract Brewing 16 06-04-2009 06:27 AM
Difference in Dry Malt Extract and Liquid Extract ohill1981 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 12-09-2008 03:44 PM
Dry vs. Liquid Malt Extract ahsndpro Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 01-20-2007 03:26 AM
Why liquid malt extract? spb All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 10-11-2006 04:00 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS