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Old 10-21-2012, 06:08 PM   #1
Thanat0s
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Default Liquid CO2?

So I was reading this thread earlier:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/co2-...re-psi-265611/

And I was wondering, how does one get the liquid CO2 in the first place? I'm buying a tank but have no idea how to get liquid co2.

Any help would be appreciated.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:37 PM   #2
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All CO2 tank fills are in fact liquid, just like propane. I know it's confusing because you open the valve and you get gas. That's because it boils as soon as you lower the head space pressure. Science is awesome.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:39 PM   #3
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Having liquid CO2 is probably not going to be practicable for home use. Basically to have it be a liquid you need a low enough temperature and a high enough pressure, something very roughly iirc like -150C and 200psig. So that means insulated tanks for one. Then if you drop the pressure too low, it turns solid (dry ice), so you wouldn't be able to 'pour' it for example.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:40 PM   #4
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Are you wondering where to get it filled locally? Common places most of us use: gas distributors (Airgas, Matheson), welding shops, fire extinguisher shops, homebrew shops, beverage supply shops.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porcupine73 View Post
Having liquid CO2 is probably not going to be practicable for home use. Basically to have it be a liquid you need a low enough temperature and a high enough pressure, something very roughly iirc like -150C and 200psig. So that means insulated tanks for one. Then if you drop the pressure too low, it turns solid (dry ice), so you wouldn't be able to 'pour' it for example.
Um, no. If it's in an inspected CO2 tank (the only legal way to get it in the US) it'll boil off to maintain a high enough pressure to remain in the liquid form. No insulation required. As Bobby pointed out, same deal as propane. If you want actual liquid CO2 to come out, you can get a tank with a dip tube. But please don't mess around with that unless you have the proper training.
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Old 10-21-2012, 06:42 PM   #6
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Oh ok I didn't know you could have it be liquid at room temps, but yes I see it says above maybe 840psig at room temp it will be liquid too.

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Old 10-21-2012, 06:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zachattack View Post
If you want actual liquid CO2 to come out, you can get a tank with a dip tube. But please don't mess around with that unless you have the proper training.

That's... what I need.
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Old 10-21-2012, 06:58 PM   #8
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What do you need liquid CO2 to come out of the tank for?

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Old 10-21-2012, 07:09 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
What do you need liquid CO2 to come out of the tank for?
It's actually not for homebrewing beer -- I just saw this forum and you folks seemed to be quite knowledgeable.

It's another food-related project I'm doing with a friend. Keeping the idea secret for now.

I just needed to know how to dispense liquid CO2 into a system.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:11 PM   #10
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good luck with your secret project.

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