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Old 01-18-2013, 05:20 PM   #11
camiller
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Then again, if you realize on brew day that you forgot to order something and your LHBS went out of business due to online competition you can't just hop over and get what you need.

I do try to support my LHBS but I wont lie, I participate in group buys and buy online occasionally when I want something that the LHBS doesn't stock.

Full disclosure, I work part time (Saturdays only) at my LHBS so I do benefit from an employee discount.



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Old 01-18-2013, 05:21 PM   #12
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I support local whenever possible, but for selfish reasons. I like having the ability to run out and get a missing ingredient. If he goes out of business, I would hate to rely on internet only. If something is majorly overpriced, I will purchase online (brew kettles, burners, etc), however, I do feel good helping him keep his store viable. It's a win-win for both of us.

Our LHBS near me has very competitive prices, and he gives a 10% discount to members of AHA. He holds classes, answers questions, and provides excellent guidance. I don't mind paying a little more to have quick access to good service.

(Props to Brewmeister in Roseville/Folsom - Great LHBS)



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Old 01-18-2013, 05:23 PM   #13
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Yeah, your LHBS is definitely gouging. I also compared my LHBS with NB. All-grain, build-your-own recipes, were slightly cheaper than NB but NB kits were the cheapest route.

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Old 01-18-2013, 05:23 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by 45_70sharps View Post
I don't agree.
Buying local supports your community with jobs.
Every dollar spend local makes it's rounds through the local community several times.
When that dollar is making it's rounds, it may come back to where you work and help keep you employed.
It's the same theory as buying American made products.

When we get to the point of ecommerce taking over, you won't be able to shop local.
When you need another vial of yeast, there will be no place local to buy it. Same will go with a T.V. or a pair of shoes.

I do think however that the local guys have to do their part.
Sometimes the attitude of I'm the only game in town causes price gouging. If they don't play fair, I don't feel the need to support them.

With the volume of sales and the overhead of a brick and mortar store, your local store isn't charging in excess.
They probably eek out a living at what they charge.
They will also be there if you need something and don't want to wait a week or pay huge costs to get it in two days.
I can't argue there. Supporting local business does come full circle.

However, we are undoubtedly headed in the direction of majority eCommerce. Its only a matter of years..

Walmart is so successful because they were able to cut cost (arguably unethical) delivering the goods at a lower cost than the competition. In the end, the giant retailer has driven out thousands of local stores. Online shopping is the new Walmart and may even take out wally world one day.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:24 PM   #15
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As the diehard anti-technology crowd dies off, brick and mortar stores will be a thing of the past.
What scares me is that you might be right about this.

When it happens, the economy will begin to crumble.
Retail is a huge part of the economy and when you get rid of the jobs associated with it, the tax the stores pay ( beyond sales tax ), the tax the jobs create, the development and realestate sales loss, the garbage collection, the electrical use and on and on, you lost a ton of money in the community.
When those jobs and fees are eliminated, there are less people with money in their pocket so everything else, right down to McDonalds has lost customers and so some of those begin to go away.
A chain reaction is started and there are few jobs left.

Even someone like me pays.
I'm a surveyor so you can't outsource my job, can't mail order it either.
If people in my community aren't working, they aren't calling me.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:25 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 45_70sharps View Post
...
One more ting to think about is if you don't buy bulk amounts, the local brew store will sell you 1 lb, 2 oz of a grain weighed out.
The online places don't sell in less than even pounds.
...
Some online places sell by the ounce, and my LHBS doesn't package in store so we only sell in pre-packages 1#/10#/full sack sizes. For the volume of business we do keeping a scale and paying the state for annual inspections/certification of it is too expensive.

As before... Full disclosure I work there part time.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:27 PM   #17
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It would be interesting to do this with the big 4. Northern,Midwest,Austin and Morebeer.
If anyone is up for the challenge I will post the quantities of each that I purchased. Let me know
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:32 PM   #18
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I don't mind paying the LHBS a "few" extra bucks in most cases, but it really depends on how much of a difference in price we're talking about. For example, I needed some bottles a few weeks ago. I bought a case at the LHBS for about $3 more than I could have gotten them on line, plus I didn't have to wait a week for shipping. So if it's just a single purchase like that I'll pay the extra for the sake of convenience. However, if I'm placing a large order and plan ahead, $23 is $23 and I'll buy on line.

In my area I have 3-4 LHBS's. One of them is pretty reasonable and I will do the bulk of my buying from them. I stopped in a different LHBS yesterday and was shocked to see them charging $180 for the same grain mill I can get online for $120. I'm all for supporting the local economy, but I'm more for not giving $60 away just for the sake of doing so.

As for the argument of a dollar spent in the local economy makes it's rounds through several times over, well the $60 I can save on a grain mill by buying online can then be spent at local merchants that actually offer me a fair deal

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Old 01-18-2013, 05:32 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 45_70sharps View Post
What scares me is that you might be right about this.

When it happens, the economy will begin to crumble.
Retail is a huge part of the economy and when you get rid of the jobs associated with it, the tax the stores pay ( beyond sales tax ), the tax the jobs create, the development and realestate sales loss, the garbage collection, the electrical use and on and on, you lost a ton of money in the community.
When those jobs and fees are eliminated, there are less people with money in their pocket so everything else, right down to McDonalds has lost customers and so some of those begin to go away.
A chain reaction is started and there are few jobs left.

Even someone like me pays.
I'm a surveyor so you can't outsource my job, can't mail order it either.
If people in my community aren't working, they aren't calling me.
Couldn't agree with you more. It will have a trickle down effect but it is inevitable.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:36 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard-SSV View Post
I don't mind paying the LHBS a "few" extra bucks in most cases, but it really depends on how much of a difference in price we're talking about. For example, I needed some bottles a few weeks ago. I bought a case at the LHBS for about $3 more than I could have gotten them on line, plus I didn't have to wait a week for shipping. So if it's just a single purchase like that I'll pay the extra for the sake of convenience. However, if I'm placing a large order and plan ahead, $23 is $23 and I'll buy on line.

In my area I have 3-4 LHBS's. One of them is pretty reasonable and I will do the bulk of my buying from them. I stopped in a different LHBS yesterday and was shocked to see them charging $180 for the same grain mill I can get online for $120. I'm all for supporting the local economy, but I'm more for not giving $60 away just for the sake of doing so.

As for the argument of a dollar spent in the local economy makes it's rounds through several times over, well the $60 I can save on a grain mill by buying online can then be spent at local merchants that actually offer me a fair deal
Agreed. Despite my retail opposition, I will still use them for items that I forgot to order or need now. This is until they disappear...

Buying exclusively online will of course require that you do a bit more planning ahead.


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