Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Irish moss?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-06-2012, 12:04 PM   #1
sundaypapers
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 74
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default Irish moss?

I just started brewing, a week and a half ago, and just yesterday I upgraded to 5 gallons from one gallon and got two extract kits from Austin Homebrew supply (Roggenbier and an Oktoberfest). Im really interested in sticking with the German purity law and I was curious where Irish Moss fits into that equation. I'm not overly concerned about it right now, this is more information that I will utilize when I start all grain brewing in a month or so, but I've read that as far as getting a clear beer it is a good option. I personally don't mind a beer that is not crystal clear, but those I plan on sharing with may be underwhelmed by the cloudiness of the beer. Is Irish moss allowed under the purity law? I just want to know. Are rules meant to be broken?

__________________
sundaypapers is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 12:07 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,667
Liked 4636 Times on 3367 Posts
Likes Given: 909

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundaypapers View Post
I just started brewing, a week and a half ago, and just yesterday I upgraded to 5 gallons from one gallon and got two extract kits from Austin Homebrew supply (Roggenbier and an Oktoberfest). Im really interested in sticking with the German purity law and I was curious where Irish Moss fits into that equation. I'm not overly concerned about it right now, this is more information that I will utilize when I start all grain brewing in a month or so, but I've read that as far as getting a clear beer it is a good option. I personally don't mind a beer that is not crystal clear, but those I plan on sharing with may be underwhelmed by the cloudiness of the beer. Is Irish moss allowed under the purity law? I just want to know. Are rules meant to be broken?
I don't think finings are allowed under the Reinhotsgebot. But I don't brew according to it, so I use kettle finings all the time anyway!

I use whirlfloc (a tablet form of Irish moss) and then no other finings and get super clear beer. I know others use finings like gelatin later on, but I want a vegetarian friendly beer. Irish moss and Whirlfloc are derived from seaweed.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 12:15 PM   #3
sundaypapers
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 74
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks Yooper! I saw that gelatin was used and I was also interested in keeping the beer vegetarian since several of my friends are vegetarian. From the UP? My wife's family is from Negaunee and Ishpeming! Maybe you can help settle a debate we have often: who has the best Cudighi? Cheers!

__________________
sundaypapers is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 12:20 PM   #4
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,667
Liked 4636 Times on 3367 Posts
Likes Given: 909

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundaypapers View Post
Thanks Yooper! I saw that gelatin was used and I was also interested in keeping the beer vegetarian since several of my friends are vegetarian. From the UP? My wife's family is from Negaunee and Ishpeming! Maybe you can help settle a debate we have often: who has the best Cudighi? Cheers!
Best cudighi is in this little hole-in-the-wall dingy bar in Iron River. It seats about 6.

If you use whirlfloc in the last 15 minutes or the boil (or Irish moss, rehydrated), and chill quickly after the boil, you should get a pretty clear beer without additional finings. I never use anything else, as people would not expect beer to be non-vegan/vegetarian friendly.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 12:23 PM   #5
sundaypapers
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 74
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Awesome, thanks for the info. Also, I need to find out about this dingy bar...

__________________
sundaypapers is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 12:37 PM   #6
dstranger99
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Charlottesville, Va
Posts: 1,020
Liked 105 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

I used Irish Moss for the 1st time just the other day. I picked up a baggy of it for .50 cents at my LBS. I figured I'd give it a try.....Glad I wasn't pulled over taking it home, cause it looks like a small bag of weed.

__________________

__________________________

Primary: Caribou Slobber

Kegged: Stout

Bottled: Cent Blonde, Jakes Brown, Stout

I love Yooper........

dstranger99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 01:44 PM   #7
ludomonster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: berlin, nj
Posts: 507
Liked 33 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

For wheat beers, you shouldn't use finings. You might think the exception would be krystalweizen, but that clarity usually comes from other methods such as filtering. If you want to avoid using finings, you still have options. You can filter the beer. You can use a secondary chamber. You can cold crash. Or, you can select a yeast that is highly flocullating.

From what I understand, Coors doesn't use finings to clarify their beer (Designing Great Beers). As for lagers, I would assume that bottom fermentation and extended time at low temperatures could clarify your beer. I recently had a dunkelweizen that was in my fridge for 6 months and that cleared.

__________________
ludomonster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 01:56 PM   #8
rhamilton
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,257
Liked 64 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Reinhotsgebot only allows water, barley, & hops.

Roggenbier is a rye beer, so it instantly isn't a Reinhotsgebot-compliant beer.

So forget the German purity laws since any addition of a non-barley grain will make it non-compliant. And yes, adding any fining agent violates Reinhotsgebot.

__________________
On Deck: Cornucopia Oktoberfest
Primary: Centennial Blonde v2, Ed Wort's Kolsch
Secondary: none
Kegged: County Jail Pale Ale, AHS Anniv IPA, AHS Brooklyn Brown, Raspberry Wheat, Blood Orange Hefe, Ranger IPA clone (x2), Newcastle clone, AHS Irish Red, Centennial Blonde
Bottled: Session Series Belgian Saison, Apocalypso, Pecan Porter, DFH 90 Minute Clone, Apfelwein (x2), Wytchmaker Rye IPA Clone, Vienna/Simcoe SMaSH, Munich/Cascade SMaSH
rhamilton is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 03:24 PM   #9
NordeastBrewer77
NBA Playa
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 7 reviews
 
NordeastBrewer77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Posts: 7,933
Liked 1075 Times on 783 Posts
Likes Given: 3977

Default

Moss is great, definitely not Reinhotsgebot friendly, but it's the only fining I've ever needed to get a good, clean beer. I do wanna say a couple things though; first, I use a whirl floc tab in every beer, even hefe's and my hefe's are still cloudy and hazy. I think, and this is based on my experience alone, one would need more than a whirlfloc to drop all the proteins in a hefe. Second, not all German beers still adhere to the Purity Law, like rhamilton said, a rye beer, or a hefeweisse would violate it right away with their grain bills. It's a neat, historic law, and more power to brewers who can adhere to it, but I'd feel severely limited in my brewing if I did. Third, if your Irish Moss looks like your weed, you're doing one of two things wrong.

__________________
The Polk Street Brewery

Brewin' 'n' Que'n - YouTube Shenanigans

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
can i drink this? I mean. Im gunna. But is it fine?
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
it's not a barley wine. it's an ale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
Have you seen the price of ketchup lately? And I'm not talking Heinz.
NordeastBrewer77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2012, 03:56 PM   #10
IXVolt
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
IXVolt's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 1,731
Liked 78 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 76

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
(or Irish moss, rehydrated)
You rehydrate Irish Moss??

Why?
__________________
IXVolt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools