New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > IPA first batch notes/questions




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-04-2013, 03:55 PM   #1
dlprice45
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 37
Liked 5 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default IPA first batch notes/questions

Hi,

This is my first thread but I've been obsessively reading the forum for a few weeks now. I've had my first ever batch of beer in bottles for two weeks now, an extract IPA kit from True Brew, and I tried a few during the Super Bowl yesterday. I know many will say to leave it two more weeks to be fully mature, and I will, but let me ask a couple questions.

One, the kit came with wood chips to lend an oak flavor, which I guess is a British IPA thing as most American IPAs don't go for that. I put them in the primary fermenter and left it for 3 weeks at 70 degrees before bottling (a good week+ longer than the instructions called for). Well, now I think the oak flavor is overdone, there is a bitter oaky aftertaste, almost astringency that I don't associate with hops. I think it's the wood. Is it overdone because I left it in primary longer than instructions called for? Will that oak bitterness fade with some more time in the bottle, or is it likely there to stay? I'll definitely leave the chips out next time.

Two, I think I overcarbed it. I used the whole 5 oz. priming sugar on a batch that actually came out to about 4.5 gallons after gravity readings and trub loss. Next time I will use a priming calculator and less sugar. I bottled a lot of the batch in swing-top bottles, so if I uncapped and then recapped the bottles to release some CO2 pressure, would that help? Or just RDWAHAHB?

Regardless of these issues, the beer is drinkable and I will quaff all of it, but I've learned some good lessons and that's what it's all about. Thanks for your input.

David



__________________
dlprice45 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 03:58 PM   #2
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 3,488
Liked 273 Times on 235 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

If you're making an oaked IPA, lightly toasted oak "chips" usually go in the secondary (not the primary) until the flavor is where you want it to be; probably a week or two. It is not really a British or an American thing.

Regarding the carb level, I personally wouldn't uncap and recap. Let them be, or when drinking, swirl the beer in your glass a bit more and longer than usual. Lesson learned for next time.



__________________
bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 04:08 PM   #3
stpug
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,068
Liked 279 Times on 242 Posts
Likes Given: 127

Default

Yes, the oak should mellow and blend better given a little time. A couple weeks should help; a month or more would do wonders.

You will likely be in the realm of belgian beer carbonation (3.0-3.3) with that amount of corn sugar to batch size - not a terrible thing. You can either leave it as bobbrews suggests, or uncap/recap to release a little carbonation. Since they are swingtops it should be easy and fast to do all bottles. Or, just leave it

__________________
stpug is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 04:17 PM   #4
dlprice45
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 37
Liked 5 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Thanks guys. As for putting the chips in secondary, the kit instructions (notorious for being wrong, I know) said to put them in primary before pitching yeast, so that's what I did. I'll give them more time and see what happens.

One other thing I noticed, I used big 1-liter swing tops to bottle most of the batch, with the remainder going into regular 12-oz bottles. Well, the bitterness is more pronounced in the liter bottles than it is in the 12 ozers, which is interesting. I guess the bigger bottles need more conditioning time than the little ones?

I also discovered that with the 1 liter bottles, those are better for times when you have at least two other people drinking with you because you need to pour the entire bottle all at once. Otherwise you risk mixing up too much bottle yeast into any beer that you don't pour. I drank a glass that had a good amount of yeast in it, and had the beer farts all night. Next time I'll just do a few 1 liters and the rest 12 or 22 oz.

__________________
dlprice45 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 04:30 PM   #5
MattsFlyShop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sparks, Nevada
Posts: 47
Likes Given: 6

Default

OK, I think I maybe Screwed Up, when I was brewing another APA/IPA we accidentally added the Kit's (4) oz of hops at the beginning of the boil, (2oz) each of Cascade and Northern Brewer... I was supposed to put the Cascade in at the end on my boil, but OOOPS! so, being that I used my Flavoring Hops as bittering, I went ahead and used an additional ounce of Cascade for the 10 minute steep... I plan on a Simcoe dry Hop (1-2)oz... now... what am I in for? is this brew going to be palatable?

__________________
MattsFlyShop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 04:35 PM   #6
unionrdr
Gotta home brew jones
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 26,588
Liked 1662 Times on 1467 Posts
Likes Given: 1138

Default

It's gunna have a goodly amount of bitterness,that is sure. But since they were flavor hops,the AA% won't be as much as a normal bittering hop would.
__________________
Everything works if ya let it-Roady(meatloaf)
unionrdr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 04:43 PM   #7
clevernonsense
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: waltham, MA
Posts: 22
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

If it's too bitter, age a month. If after a month it's too bitter, age the rest another month. Keep going until you're happy. Take notes Aging also changes most of the other flavors too, so the results aren't always improving in a beer, but I find you almost always get something tasty eventually.

I've make "oak-aged vodka" before just for funsies. Takes 2 years of aging for it to get really tasty. The bottle is now 7 years old and I think it's finally peaked.

__________________
clevernonsense is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 05:07 PM   #8
stpug
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,068
Liked 279 Times on 242 Posts
Likes Given: 127

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattsFlyShop View Post
OK, I think I maybe Screwed Up, when I was brewing another APA/IPA we accidentally added the Kit's (4) oz of hops at the beginning of the boil, (2oz) each of Cascade and Northern Brewer... I was supposed to put the Cascade in at the end on my boil, but OOOPS! so, being that I used my Flavoring Hops as bittering, I went ahead and used an additional ounce of Cascade for the 10 minute steep... I plan on a Simcoe dry Hop (1-2)oz... now... what am I in for? is this brew going to be palatable?
You should start your own new topic rather than posting this as a reply in this thread. You'll get more individualized help this way AND it's courteous to the original poster so that advice/recommendations are not mixed.
__________________
stpug is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 05:27 PM   #9
MattsFlyShop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sparks, Nevada
Posts: 47
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stpug

You should start your own new topic rather than posting this as a reply in this thread. You'll get more individualized help this way AND it's courteous to the original poster so that advice/recommendations are not mixed.
My apologies
__________________
MattsFlyShop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2013, 12:10 AM   #10
MattsFlyShop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sparks, Nevada
Posts: 47
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clevernonsense
If it's too bitter, age a month. If after a month it's too bitter, age the rest another month. Keep going until you're happy. Take notes Aging also changes most of the other flavors too, so the results aren't always improving in a beer, but I find you almost always get something tasty eventually.

I've make "oak-aged vodka" before just for funsies. Takes 2 years of aging for it to get really tasty. The bottle is now 7 years old and I think it's finally peaked.
Sounds pretty good, how dark is it?


__________________
MattsFlyShop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just racked to secondary-notes and questions Pelican521 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 01-22-2013 02:14 PM
Second Batch Bottled, Notes wherestheyeast Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 03-14-2012 08:41 PM
First batch tasting notes... vanmartin74 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 02-18-2012 05:29 PM
Newbie notes and questions VillageBrew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 07-18-2011 01:35 PM
First batch notes Croy9000 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 07-03-2008 09:46 PM