New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Ingredients for a first brew




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-13-2007, 12:29 AM   #1
Sutpen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 19
Default Ingredients for a first brew

Hey all, I'm getting ready for my first brew day, and I need a little help.

I've heard people suggest wheat beers for a first brew, but I don't love wheat beers, and I figure I should be making something I love. I have Charlie Papazian's book, and an experienced friend of mine (who will be helping me out) gave me Dave Miller's Homebrewing Guide. I was glancing through Miller's book, and his recipes seem pretty straightforward. I think I've settled on two possibilities, namely an Oatmeal Stout, or a Double Trappist-style Ale. I'm going to include Miller's recipes below, and I'd be really grateful to anyone who can recommend an online retailer to get this stuff (no LHBS, I'm afraid). I'm going to have to pick up a few items that my friend can't seem to find, like a hydrometer, and some new siphoning equipment, in addition to the ingredients, and austinhomebrew.com is looking promising. Again, any guidance on specifics would really help me out, including "What are you thinking brewing _____ on your first go!?!"

Thanks in advance.


EDIT: sorry, here are the recipes Miller suggests

-Oatmeal Stout-
7.5 lbs British pale ale malt
8 oz British caramel malt
8 oz roasted barley
12 oz flaked oats
Bittering hops: 8 AAU pellets (Fuggle)
-->British ale or stout yeast

-Trappist Ale (Double)-
9.5 lbs pale, two-row malt
1 lb 40 L crystal malt
1 lb dark brown sugar
Bittering hops: 7 AAU pellets (50-50 blend, Hallertau and Fuggle)
-->Belgian Trappist ale yeast



__________________

Last edited by Sutpen; 08-13-2007 at 12:33 AM.
Sutpen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 12:43 AM   #2
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Both of those will be fine to do for you first brew! Choose the one you like best, also think about fermentation temps. The stout will prefer mid 60s where as the Belgian likes it warmer...in the upper 60s/lower 70s.

AHS (Austin Homebrew Supply) is an excellent source for ingredients. Other ones that people like are Morebeer, Midwest, and NorthernBrewer. Can't really go wrong with these, choose the one that has what you want and is the best price. Also, if one is closer they will get it to you faster.

I think having an experienced brewer to help you will make things go much smother. Good luck and welcome.



__________________
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 03:17 AM   #3
Sutpen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 19
Default

Ah, thanks for the advice. One more question: I was under the (very general, I'm sure) impression that ale yeasts are okay in the 70s, and it was lager yeasts that needed to be in the 60s and below. I'm curious because, even if I don't brew the stout this time, I will most definitely want to get one in the fermenter for my 2nd or 3rd brew (stouts are among my absolute favorite beers). The temperature requirement is a concern because I'm a poor student, and although I'm living in a house, I have a hot basement and no central air. The only acceptable place to keep my carboys is in my room, which is generally around 72 degrees. Theoretically, I could set my AC window unit to 65, but that would be pretty cold a room to sleep in, etc. Anyone have any similar experiences? I've been looking for a cheap fridge to stick in the basement on craigslist, but so far no luck.

__________________
Sutpen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 03:24 AM   #4
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Most ales will do well up to 70. It really depends on the strain, but 70 would be my max if I did not know otherwise. You can look at the yeast suppliers website (for example http://www.whitelabs.com) for exact temperature ranges.

Now, there are things that you can do to keep the temp down. You can get a big rubber bin/trash can put the bucket/carboy in there an fill it with water, cover it with a towel, and point a fan on it. The evaporation will cool it. Adding soda bottles, filled with ice, and frozen will cool that even more.

The Irish ale yeast, for example, likes 65-68. Over that probably wont kill your beer but you risk off flavors (too much fruitiness, etc.).

__________________
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 03:39 PM   #5
Sutpen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 19
Default

Ok, I have one of those big plastic things you stick kegs in and plenty of extra towels. Do I need to take the same steps to keep a secondary fermenter cool? And what about the bottles once they're conditioning?

__________________
Sutpen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 03:47 PM   #6
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutpen
Ok, I have one of those big plastic things you stick kegs in and plenty of extra towels. Do I need to take the same steps to keep a secondary fermenter cool? And what about the bottles once they're conditioning?
Temperature is most important during active fermentation. When you rack to secondary active fermentation should be done, so temperature is not as important. But, the point of a secondary is to clear the beer and that is usually most successfully at low temperatures. I might recommend skipping the secondary...a lot of people don't do it and get great results. You can do a search, there are a couple threads where this is debated.

Bottles can be at any temperature (less than say 80) to carb. Once carbed they can stored cool or warm. If stored cool they will clear up more and have a longer life. I keep my bottles at room temperature until I have room in the fridge, keeping as many as I can in the fridge.
__________________

Last edited by Beerrific; 08-13-2007 at 03:50 PM.
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 09:34 PM   #7
PseudoChef
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
PseudoChef's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: West Chicago 'Burbs, IL
Posts: 3,418
Liked 101 Times on 75 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

All-grain for a first brew is impressive!! With the recipes you listed, it doesn't seem like one would be better over the other.

I'm on a stout kick, so I say go for that one and send me one for, uhh....critiquing!

__________________
PseudoChef is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 09:42 PM   #8
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PseudoChef
All-grain for a first brew is impressive!! With the recipes you listed, it doesn't seem like one would be better over the other.

I'm on a stout kick, so I say go for that one and send me one for, uhh....critiquing!
I think the first ingredients on the list are extracts...probably meant for LME.
__________________
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 10:37 PM   #9
Sutpen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 19
Default

Yeah, that was LME. Haha, to be honest I feel like kind of a chump brewing with extract, so I'll do my best to accelerate my graduation to all-grain. I just need a few months to accumulate the money for the additional equipment...

Anyone know where I can get less than 25 lbs of flaked oats at one time? How do you guys buy ingredients when you don't want a kit offered by an online retailer?

__________________
Sutpen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-13-2007, 11:02 PM   #10
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sutpen
Yeah, that was LME. Haha, to be honest I feel like kind of a chump brewing with extract, so I'll do my best to accelerate my graduation to all-grain. I just need a few months to accumulate the money for the additional equipment...

Anyone know where I can get less than 25 lbs of flaked oats at one time? How do you guys buy ingredients when you don't want a kit offered by an online retailer?
You shouldn't extract, is where everyone starts (well almost). There are a few brewers on this forum that have been doing extract for years and make great looking beer. If you can use DME, it is bit more expensive but IMO will give you a better beer. Use at the rate of about 0.8lb DME for each 1lb LME.

I would suggest doing a few extracts, if you feel comfortable with the process move to partial mashing, then to all grain eventually. Don't rush, you can make excellent beer with all these processes.

All the online supplier (AHS, Morebeer, Midwest, NorthernBrewer, etc.) sell all these ingredients separately. You should be able to get all the grain by the ounce/pound, hops by the ounce, and extract by the pound. Check the price, but Quaker Oats might be cheaper (rolled oats=flaked oats).


__________________
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lots of ingredients! Must Brew! Recipe help? ZBrewMan Recipes/Ingredients 16 04-19-2009 08:26 AM
What to brew with these ingredients? meister Recipes/Ingredients 8 03-03-2009 07:56 PM
Need help selecting ingredients for next brew DeafSmith Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 02-07-2009 10:20 PM
Brew with old ingredients juicyjuice Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-05-2008 07:00 PM
We have the ingredients, we can brew it better, tastier... EinGutesBier General Techniques 1 10-05-2007 02:29 PM



Newest Threads