The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > I'm ready to enter your magical world

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-02-2012, 03:07 AM   #21
ThatGeekGuy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ThatGeekGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Sugar Land, TX
Posts: 451
Liked 61 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelString_Will View Post
My only concern is that you started with a lager, which needs lower temperatures and takes forever to get a taste of (which is not only frustrating, but if you messed anything up you don't find out for a long time). Do you have a place where you can keep the beer cold? If you can, a small dorm sized fridge where you can lager it after primary fermentation is great.

Might suggest you pick up a heffeweizen or saison (depending on the temps in your place this time of year) in the mean time. Both are quick fermenting yeasts that can be enjoyed very young.

I'd try at least 5 batches at extract, to make sure you really enjoy doing it before you invest the energy it takes to get a proper all grain set up going.
Not to worry too much, the BB Kit has yeast that allows it to ferment as an ale as well as a lager depending on the temperature. Either way it's going to be a good beer ....
__________________

Primary 1: Lonely
Primary 2: Lonely
Secondary 1: Orange Mead (Made Jan. 2013)
On Tap #1: Catcher in the Rye Pale Ale
On Tap #2: Vanilla Porter
On Deck: Thinking....

ThatGeekGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 03:22 AM   #22
kyled
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 13
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

We are in Indiana so our basement stays a solid 60 from now til March. By then I hope to have a fridge for it.

__________________
kyled is offline
SteelString_Will Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 09:53 AM   #23
BrewerBear
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: !, !
Posts: 1,177
Liked 68 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

all grain brewing is not that hard,but you should not feel any rush to have to do it. I made some very good beers with extract kits as have others.Main thing is work on the fundamentals.

__________________
BrewerBear is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 11:11 AM   #24
Trokair
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bristow, VA
Posts: 154
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewerBear View Post
all grain brewing is not that hard,but you should not feel any rush to have to do it. I made some very good beers with extract kits as have others.Main thing is work on the fundamentals.
Exactly. I made the move to All Grain quickly because there wasn't enough going on in Extract brewing for me. That said I have yet to have a flawless brew day. Something always goes wrong. This last time I forgot to add the bittering hops until 50 minutes into the boil.

Even with all of my mistakes I have still made some really tasty beers. Hopefully I can try again for that perfect process on Monday.
__________________

Good beer is a thing worth striving for. Mistakes will be made, but rest assured that the end result is well worth the effort.

Trokair is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 11:54 AM   #25
william_shakes_beer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,833
Liked 83 Times on 76 Posts

Default

Continue with extract until you feel comfortable with the process. Sanitization, boil, cooling, cleanup, prime and bottling. These are where many batches go wrong, both extract and AG. Using an extract kit you can pretty much guarantee that unless you forgot to add a container of extract, you will hit the proper OG. AG presents additional variables that need to be controlled. For some the appropriate transition point will be the second batch. For me it was about 1 year.

__________________

Last edited by william_shakes_beer; 11-02-2012 at 11:55 AM. Reason: phat phingers
william_shakes_beer is offline
Dan Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 12:37 PM   #26
unionrdr
Wannabe author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 27,817
Liked 1829 Times on 1612 Posts
Likes Given: 1298

Default

I have to bottle my first partial mash today. We'll see how good it is come thanksgiving. The yeast settled out,but it's still abit cloudy from the fine crush I did. Should settle out by drinkin time though. Mash temps seem to be the biggy in pm or ag.
__________________
Everything works if ya let it-Roady(meatloaf)
My new book is on Amazon Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3MCU0W
unionrdr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 01:14 PM   #27
Effingbeer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 246
Liked 23 Times on 18 Posts

Default

I will oppose the patience posts. GO FOR IT! There are so many great ways to do all-grain. BIAB, cooler MLTs, direct-fire, electric.
If you go to partial mash, it's like half a baby step to do BIAB. Yes, there will be a learning curve, but that is the hobby part of it right?

That being said, I started with partial mash kits for about a year -10 or so batches. But I was always put off by the limitations of extract(especially the color and fementability fluctuations).
If the BIAB technique had been a little more developed when I started, I probably would have gone that route.

Makes ingredients a little cheaper and there are only about a million great recipes on here.

__________________
Effingbeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 01:36 PM   #28
unionrdr
Wannabe author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 27,817
Liked 1829 Times on 1612 Posts
Likes Given: 1298

Default

Even though I've only done one pm so far,I can already see the limitations of biab. I'm thinking of switching from the muslin grain bag from the kit to the 5G paint strainer bag to fit the BK with my cake cooling rack in the bottom. That way maybe I can get away with a less fine crush & cut some of the cloudiness. I thought maybe with the paint strainer bag stretched over the top of the BK,I could stir the mash & do some kinda different take on vourlofing?...maybe with a baster,or just soak the grain bag in the pot of sparge water as others here do?
__________________
Everything works if ya let it-Roady(meatloaf)
My new book is on Amazon Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3MCU0W
unionrdr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 03:34 PM   #29
Homercidal
Moderator
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 22,840
Liked 1902 Times on 1373 Posts
Likes Given: 1045

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewerBear View Post
all grain brewing is not that hard,but you should not feel any rush to have to do it. I made some very good beers with extract kits as have others.Main thing is work on the fundamentals.
I concur. There is no good reason to switch to AG until YOU decide you need to. As long as you are using fresh ingredients and proper methods extract brewing can rival AG brewing for finished beer.

That said, once you are comfortable with extract brewing processes (aerating wort, pitching proper yeast, transferring wort, fermentation temp control, etc.) there is nothing except a very small investment in equipment to stop you from going AG. It's actual a lot easier than most people think it is until they do it.

The hardest part is buying the necessary equipment. You can save considerably by doing BIAB. The small batch method doesn't require a large kettle and possibly the burner upgrade to boil a full batch. Most people can do a 1/2 batch on their stove like extract.

A turkey fryer setup is really all you need to get started on full boils and they run around $60 (Maybe less if you can find some good sales or CL listings after the holidays!)

But the most important things to know and follow are all the same no matter which method you use to make wort.
__________________
Homercidal is online now
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-04-2012, 01:11 AM   #30
kyled
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 13
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

When I took a gravity reading today my hydrometer submerged completely for about 10 seconds then came back up. Should I be concerned?

Also I siphoned into a glass carbony from a plastic bucket today, is there a good method to not lose my hydrometer while taking a reading in it?

Also if it helps I am 7 days in

__________________
kyled is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wort ready to be pitched...yeast starter not so ready Silverbullet Fermentation & Yeast 3 07-05-2012 06:03 PM
The Miraculous, Magical, Magnificent History Of Beer [Infographic] sweetcell General Beer Discussion 3 03-21-2012 05:14 PM
Is the brew magic magical? scottseverance Introductions 7 10-02-2010 05:52 PM
Just got back from a trip around the World (Disney World)... Recusit8m General Beer Discussion 4 10-08-2009 07:04 PM
The art of perfecting your brew? When do you know it is ready for the big world? shagington Recipes/Ingredients 9 07-09-2008 12:20 AM