Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > I want I carbed ale

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-07-2014, 02:20 AM   #31
wingedcoyote
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 151
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

Great post Hfx, and very handsome beer. Did you take gravity readings? From your description and the photos my guess is that your yeast wasn't totally done fermenting and it created a little carbonation with residual sugars in the bottle.

Also, your ambient temp indoors is 55f? And I thought I was tough for keeping it in the low 60s!

__________________

Fermenting: RBC Hidden Pipe Clone, Naked Red
Conditioning: Motueka Wheat, ESB
Drinking: Edwort's Apfelwein

wingedcoyote is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 02:37 AM   #32
rocketsan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 464
Liked 48 Times on 36 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hfxhomebrewer View Post
You're splitting the tiniest of hairs to make a moot point. That amounts to a waste of my time.



Brew on!

Nice attitude...not.


Sent from my iPhone using Home Brew
__________________
rocketsan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 12:22 PM   #33
Hfxhomebrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 20
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Wingedcoyote, I brew in my basement and its been hovering between 50 and 55 all winter down there. Chilly stuff.

I took gravity readings, FG was 1.012. It was at that level for 4 consecutive days so I deemed it finished, turned off the heat source and let it cool down.

__________________
YipYap Brewing Co
Bottled: Cream Ale, Blonde Ale, Peach Pale Ale, Stout, Chocolate Stout, ESB (Boddingtons Clone), Lime Cerveza
Coming Up: Halifax Hefe, Vanilla Dark Ale, Honey Lager, and whatever else takes my fancy
Hfxhomebrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 02:18 PM   #34
JordanKnudson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 292
Liked 43 Times on 33 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hfxhomebrewer View Post
I boiled the hops on the stove in 1.5 litres of water, the Northern Brewer for 20 minutes and the Fuggles for 15 minutes. I made a last-minute filter using a sanitised steel strainer and paper coffee filters to filter out most of the hop matter as I poured the 'hop tea' into the fermenter (didn't plan on doing this but the pellets gave me little choice, I wasn't comfortable dumping that into the fermenter, maybe next time I will). To the hop tea I added the malt extracts, molasses, and a mix of boiled and cold water to bring the volume up to 5 gallons and achieve a temp of 70f. I pitched the yeast dry on to the aerated wort and maintained the temp at 70f throughout fermentation. I did not seal the fermenter completely, I left the lid on but not snapped down. After fermentation stopped (confirmed with gravity readings) I unplugged my heat source and let the beer cool to ambient temp, which was around 55f for the remainder of it's time in primary.

This beer stayed in primary for 3 weeks, but 2 days before bottling I added gelatin finings to improve the clarity, it worked very well (first time using gelatin). I bottled in 500ml brown glass bottles without using any priming sugar whatsoever, and left the beer in the bottles for 3 further weeks before drinking the first. From the outset it was smooth drinking, very sessionable, clear and very tasty (to my tastes). There are no off smells, no off flavours, I haven't noticed any oxidation yet. The hop aroma comes through well, very mild bittering which is what I was aiming for.

I am a new brewer, this is only my sixth batch, I don't pretend to know it all but I do know what good beer tastes like, and this batch is good beer. This was the first batch I ever made using a recipe I came up with using a brew calculator, my first time using hops, and my first time using gelatin (though that wasn't part of the original plan). I learned A LOT from this batch and the results far exceeded my expectations. To a lot of people I am sure I did things in making this batch you would swear up and down was the absolute wrong thing to do (no yeast starter, no seal on the fermenter, filtering out the hop matter etc), to that I say try it yourself and see.

Hfx
Wow, this is a very unusual method! If I'm understanding correctly, you are not boiling the wort at all; instead you are just mixing it directly in the fermentor using 70 degree water, and adding a hop tea, then pitching the yeast?

I'm curious about one other thing. You mention that this was your 6th batch, and your first time using hops. What kinds of beer did you brew prior to this batch? Did you really not have any hops in there at all? Or did you mean that you were using pre-hopped extract, and thus you didn't need to add any more hops yourself?
__________________
JordanKnudson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 04:17 PM   #35
Hfxhomebrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 20
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Yup, pre-hopped, canned extract kits and one Festa Brew kit were all I had brewed prior to this batch, so I hadn't needed to worry about using hops myself.

And you are correct, I did not boil the wort at all. I warmed the containers of the malt extract in hot water to make them easier to pour, but I literally poured the LME into about 4l of boiled water (including the 1.5l hop tea), thoroughly mixed it and brought it to 20l using cold water, then used a mix of boiled and cold water to get to 70f and 23l volume. Dry yeast sprinkled on top of the foam generated via aeration, and you're off to the races.

Like I said, the method goes against what a lot of brewers trust, but why not give it a try? All you have to lose is whatever the ingredients cost and about an hour of your time to put the batch together. The ingredient list I posted cost me about $25 here in Nova Scotia, you may be able to get them for less, and literally an hour including sanitising and boiling the hops.

__________________
YipYap Brewing Co
Bottled: Cream Ale, Blonde Ale, Peach Pale Ale, Stout, Chocolate Stout, ESB (Boddingtons Clone), Lime Cerveza
Coming Up: Halifax Hefe, Vanilla Dark Ale, Honey Lager, and whatever else takes my fancy
Hfxhomebrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 04:37 PM   #36
JordanKnudson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 292
Liked 43 Times on 33 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Interesting. I guess you don't really need to boil the wort if you don't want to when using extract...the DMS is supposedly taken care of in the production of the extract, so the only other major factors in boiling (aside from non-essentials like Maillard reactions) would be sterilization of the extract and hop utilization. Since you made the hop tea, that's one down. And really, I think boiling extract to sterilize is mainly a precaution. It seems to be packaged pretty clean.

I can see the appeal of doing it that way for sure, it would be a major time saver. On the other hand, I brew AG (where you can't get away with not boiling) and I'm obsessed with all of the little details of the mash, water treatment, brewing chemistry, etc, so I don't mind spending the extra few hours playing around on brew day!

__________________
JordanKnudson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 05:13 PM   #37
Setesh
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Setesh's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Edmond, Oklahoma
Posts: 1,256
Liked 245 Times on 188 Posts
Likes Given: 282

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovesIPA View Post
The only potential problem I see is that bottle conditioning protects the beer from oxidation in the bottle. If there isn't any CO2 being produced, then the bottle will have beer plus air in it. This will oxidize the beer sooner or later. I think you'll have to figure out a way to purge the bottle with CO2 prior to filling it like the commercial breweries have to do.
I could be wrong, but I don't think the CO2 produced after the bottle is capped helps prevent oxidation. The CO2 in solution when you bottle the beer helps by allowing you to cap on foam, but any CO2 producted later provides no oxidation benefit.
By this I mean that if you mix priming sugar into your beer, fill the bottle carefully so that you have no foam but only beer and empty (filled with air) head space, then cap that beer, I don't think the CO2 that develops over the next few weeks is going to protect your beer. The O2 that was in the head space will not be pushed out, it will remain. As the pressure builds it's volume will decrease, but the same amount of molecules remain to do their dastardly work.

When you go to bottle your beer there is usually CO2 left in solution. The act of transferring the beer to bottles releases some of this CO2 which forms a foam. This CO2 filled foam displaces the air in the head space. This is why capping on foam is so important, and I imagine this is what you were talking about.
__________________
Setesh is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 08:13 PM   #38
wingedcoyote
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 151
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Setesh View Post
I could be wrong, but I don't think the CO2 produced after the bottle is capped helps prevent oxidation. The CO2 in solution when you bottle the beer helps by allowing you to cap on foam, but any CO2 producted later provides no oxidation benefit.
By this I mean that if you mix priming sugar into your beer, fill the bottle carefully so that you have no foam but only beer and empty (filled with air) head space, then cap that beer, I don't think the CO2 that develops over the next few weeks is going to protect your beer. The O2 that was in the head space will not be pushed out, it will remain. As the pressure builds it's volume will decrease, but the same amount of molecules remain to do their dastardly work.

When you go to bottle your beer there is usually CO2 left in solution. The act of transferring the beer to bottles releases some of this CO2 which forms a foam. This CO2 filled foam displaces the air in the head space. This is why capping on foam is so important, and I imagine this is what you were talking about.
I feel like I've always heard that yeast will consume oxygen left in the bottles in the process of bottle carbing. As for capping on foam... I've heard of that as an important practice in bottling from a keg, but not in bottling from a bottling bucket. At least I hope it isn't that important, because when I bottle beer with a wand from my bottling bucket it doesn't really foam at all.
__________________

Fermenting: RBC Hidden Pipe Clone, Naked Red
Conditioning: Motueka Wheat, ESB
Drinking: Edwort's Apfelwein

wingedcoyote is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 08:40 PM   #39
JordanKnudson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 292
Liked 43 Times on 33 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingedcoyote View Post
I've heard of that as an important practice in bottling from a keg, but not in bottling from a bottling bucket. At least I hope it isn't that important, because when I bottle beer with a wand from my bottling bucket it doesn't really foam at all.
Yep! When you bottle straight out of the fermentor, you don't want any bubbling. You'd be oxygenating the finished beer at that point, which of course is no good.
__________________
JordanKnudson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-07-2014, 08:43 PM   #40
Espressomattic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 39
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Some great reies. Like the. Offer forums I am on you can have three people with six opinions

When I used to work in real ale pubs I used to keep pedigree. I had two. Us timers who insisted on no sparkler. The beer poured flat. No carb, nothing. And it really enhanced the true taste.

Now I tried a bottles at night with zero carbonation and it was ok. I could actually see where a small amount would enhance it. However it lacked enough body for a car less beer. Something gulletsondon pride has a lot of body which makes up the lack of carb.

I brewed a partial mash last night with 2 kg pale ale malts, 500g of dark roasts malt and a pale ale extract. Used fuggles and goldings in the boil with goldings as a late addition

I th k this will have more body to carry zero carbonation (or what I define as zero anyway)

Being new to brewing all the replies have been really beneficial so thanks!

__________________
Espressomattic is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Over-carbed in Keg bnoe713 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 08-28-2013 07:06 PM
Un carbed wranglerx16 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 05-12-2013 09:30 PM
Carbed up already??? Scooba Bottling/Kegging 2 01-18-2012 01:10 AM
Over carbed Wit gartj Bottling/Kegging 2 09-01-2009 02:22 PM
Over-carbed? comj49 Bottling/Kegging 2 04-15-2008 10:42 PM