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Old 11-18-2011, 06:31 PM   #1
luvinit
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Default how many rackings

ok question my first batch has been racked to secondary how many times should i rack before bottling?would like the brew clear as possible

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:33 PM   #2
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Just one more to the bottling bucket or keg.

For future refernce you don't need to rack to secondary to get a clear beer. In fact many people never use a secondary.

As a practice I leave my beers in primary for a minimum of 3 to 4 weeks. I only secondary if I need to dry hop.

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:35 PM   #3
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so if I already racked from primary there is no benefit to letting it rest in secondary

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:35 PM   #4
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Use irish moss to clear and when you rack to bottle careful not to suck up any dregs.

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:40 PM   #5
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If clarity is your goal, then Leave you beer a month in primary instead.

You'll find that more and more recipes these days do not advocate moving to a secondary at all, but mention primary for a month, which is starting to reflect the shift in brewing culture that has occurred in the last 4 years, MOSTLY because of many of us on here, skipping secondary, opting for longer primaries, and writing about it. Recipes in BYO have begun stating that in their magazine. I remember the "scandal" it caused i the letters to the editor's section a month later, it was just like how it was here when we began discussing it, except a lot more civil than it was here. But after the Byo/Basic brewing experiment, they started reflecting it in their recipes.

Fermenting the beer is just a part of what the yeast do. If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leaving our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.


I get little if any sediment in my bottles, simply by opting for a long primary. This is my yeastcake for my Sri Lankin Stout that sat in primary for 5 weeks. Notice how tight the yeast cake is? None of that got racked over to my bottling bucket. And the beer is extremely clear.



That little bit of beer to the right is all of the 5 gallons that DIDN'T get vaccumed off the surface of the tight trub. Note how clear it is, there's little if any floaties in there.

When I put 5 gallons in my fermenter, I tend to get 5 gallons into bottles. The cake itself is like cement, it's about an inch thick and very, very dense, you can't just tilt your bucket and have it fall out. I had to use water pressure to get it to come out.



This is the last little bit of the same beer in the bottling bucket, this is the only sediment that made it though and that was done on purpose, when I rack I always make sure to rub the autosiphon across the bottom of the primary to make sure there's plenty of yeast in suspension to carb the beer, but my bottles are all crystal clear and have little sediment in them.

Half the time I forget to use moss, and you can't tell the difference in clarity.

I get the barest hint of sediment in my bottles....just enough for the yeast to have done the job of carbonating the beer.

THIS is where the latest discussion and all your questions answered.
We have multiple threads about this all over the place, like this one,so we really don't need to go over it again, all the info you need is here;

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

And read this for more updated information.

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Old 11-18-2011, 06:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
If clarity is your goal, then Leave you beer a month in primary instead.

You'll find that more and more recipes these days do not advocate moving to a secondary at all, but mention primary for a month, which is starting to reflect the shift in brewing culture that has occurred in the last 4 years, MOSTLY because of many of us on here, skipping secondary, opting for longer primaries, and writing about it. Recipes in BYO have begun stating that in their magazine. I remember the "scandal" it caused i the letters to the editor's section a month later, it was just like how it was here when we began discussing it, except a lot more civil than it was here. But after the Byo/Basic brewing experiment, they started reflecting it in their recipes.

Fermenting the beer is just a part of what the yeast do. If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leaving our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.


I get little if any sediment in my bottles, simply by opting for a long primary. This is my yeastcake for my Sri Lankin Stout that sat in primary for 5 weeks. Notice how tight the yeast cake is? None of that got racked over to my bottling bucket. And the beer is extremely clear.



That little bit of beer to the right is all of the 5 gallons that DIDN'T get vaccumed off the surface of the tight trub. Note how clear it is, there's little if any floaties in there.

When I put 5 gallons in my fermenter, I tend to get 5 gallons into bottles. The cake itself is like cement, it's about an inch thick and very, very dense, you can't just tilt your bucket and have it fall out. I had to use water pressure to get it to come out.



This is the last little bit of the same beer in the bottling bucket, this is the only sediment that made it though and that was done on purpose, when I rack I always make sure to rub the autosiphon across the bottom of the primary to make sure there's plenty of yeast in suspension to carb the beer, but my bottles are all crystal clear and have little sediment in them.

Half the time I forget to use moss, and you can't tell the difference in clarity.

I get the barest hint of sediment in my bottles....just enough for the yeast to have done the job of carbonating the beer.

THIS is where the latest discussion and all your questions answered.
We have multiple threads about this all over the place, like this one,so we really don't need to go over it again, all the info you need is here;

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

And read this for more updated information.
thank you
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:43 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvinit View Post
so if I already racked from primary there is no benefit to letting it rest in secondary
Depends on how long it was in primary. While it's there you might as well let it sit and bulk condition for a couple of weeks. That will allow eveything to compact into the bottom.

Yes, when you move it your bottling bucket make sure you keep the the auto-siphon uo off of the trub so you can keep the sediment out of the final beer.

For what its worth there are a lot of methods to creating a clear beer.

For example:
Add your finings with about 5 min left in the boil. I personally use one whirfloc tablet with 5 to go.
Second, get your beer from 212* to 65* as fast as possible, I recommend an immersion chiller (IC) and there are other tools that can help.
Once chilled to the appropriate temp I recommend whirlpooling and the letting the beer rest for 30 minutes before using your auto-siphon to transfer the beer to primary. To get the rest of the beer from the BK use a sanitized kitchen strainer.
Finally, let the beer sit in primary for a few weeks.

Follow these basic steps and you will instantly see a clearer beer.
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Primary: 12-12-12 Wee Heavy, Stone Ruination Clone, Bell's Better brow Ale Clone and Saison d'Hiver
Secondary:
Botteled: All Columbus IPA, Chocolate Peppermint Baltic Porter, Ewalds Altbier, Hopslam Clone, Scottish Strong Ale, Fine Creek Saison, Not so Pale Pale Ale, Double Chocolate Oatmeal Imperial Stout
Kegged: Indian Brown Ale

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