Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > how long do you let your ales frement for?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-27-2011, 02:18 PM   #1
Colt45-N-2ZigZag
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Manchester, NH
Posts: 16
Default how long do you let your ales frement for?

So im on my first brew ( Canadian Ale) and the directions said that after 4 days of frementing you add the suger and bottle it. Than let it sit for a week in a cool dark place and than put in a fridge for 3 weeks.

A few budddies of mine that used to brew a few years ago said they let it sit in there frementer for 3 weeks and than bottled it and added the suger.

Which way is the best way?

I did not take the hydrometer reading because the dumb directions said to do it before botteling which i now know is incorrect so i am not realy trusting there directions.

Any tips would be apreciated

__________________
Colt45-N-2ZigZag is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 02:23 PM   #2
martinfan30
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: carson city, nevada
Posts: 71
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colt45-N-2ZigZag View Post
So im on my first brew ( Canadian Ale) and the directions said that after 4 days of frementing you add the suger and bottle it. Than let it sit for a week in a cool dark place and than put in a fridge for 3 weeks.

A few budddies of mine that used to brew a few years ago said they let it sit in there frementer for 3 weeks and than bottled it and added the suger.

Which way is the best way?

I did not take the hydrometer reading because the dumb directions said to do it before botteling which i now know is incorrect so i am not realy trusting there directions.

Any tips would be apreciated
I'm just tasting my first batch(WCPA) after 7 days fermenting, 7 days warm conditioning, and two in the fridge.

It was good, but like everyone is saying... Let it go double that, or more.
__________________
martinfan30 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 02:26 PM   #3
Bigjuicy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Baldwin, NY
Posts: 71
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

You take hydrometer readings after cooling your wort, and when you want to see if the bulk of fermentation is complete (instructions not so dumb). Depending on how patient you are (or impatient) you could bottle it now if you are really in a rush to drink your beer. However, most beers will benefit from more time in the primary fermenter. The reason is that the yeast produces many many chemicals that can produce off flavors when it is eating up all the malt sugars. After they eat all the sugars they turn their attention to their own crap and clean those out. This is why many people choose to leave their beers in primary for atleast 2 weeks.

__________________
Bigjuicy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 02:31 PM   #4
CTownBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 312
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts

Default

I usually let mine sit in the primary for 2 weeks minimum before taking gravity readings. If you have the same gravity reading 3 days apart you know your fermentation is done. Letting it sit 2-4 weeks is probably best. It can only help clean up any off-flavors that may be present & will give your beer more clarity. Patience is a virtue!

BOTTOM LINE - You don't want to start bottling before you know for sure fermentation is complete. Otherwise, you're at risk for exploding bottles if any yeast left suspended in the beer continues to ferment sugars without any means of releasing CO2.

Sent from my iPhone using HB Talk

__________________
REVOLT BREWING COMPANY
Primary 1: n/a
Primary 2: n/a
Secondary 1
: Port BA American Sour w/Raspberries
Secondary 2: Baltic Porter
Now On Tap: New Zealand IPA, Belgian Dark Strong w/Anise & Cinnamon, Imperial Red Ale
Upcoming Brews: Port BA American Sour w/Cherries, Doppelbock, Belgian Golden Strong, Peanut Butter Imperial Porter
CTownBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 02:35 PM   #5
stumpwater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: savannah, tn
Posts: 71
Liked 9 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I'm new at this also, getting ready to brew batch #4. Bottled my first batch after 15 days. It turned out good but i wish i had waited another 2 weeks. My #2 batch was in primary for 32 days and has been in secondary for 8 and will bottle in 2 more days. I know It's ready and it's really clear! From my experience i would wait another 2 or 3 weeks, but thats just me.

__________________
stumpwater is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 02:38 PM   #6
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2767 Times on 1657 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

We need to clarify what you are asking. Are you asking how long a beer takes to complete fermenting or how long you want to leave the beer in primary? There is a distinction.

You let it ferment until it is done....it's not something you control. You let your beer ferment as long as it takes to finish. That's not something you control, a beer takes as long as it needs, it could be days or a week or more. That's not the same as leaving a beer in primary, or racking to secondary (which you should do AFTER fermentation is complete as well). But the yeast have a job to do and you need to let them do it, and they follow any calendars.

You determine when a beer is finished by taking two consequtive grav reading over a 3 day period.

How long you choose to condition the beer whether it is opting for a long primary or secondarying is one thing...But how long you let a beer ferment is a process of the yeast not you...just like bottle carbing, you can't control that either. The yeast are in charge, not us.....

I leave all my beers in primary for a month then bottle.

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 03:34 PM   #7
Redpiper
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angesles
Posts: 129
Default

As usual, Revvy and others have laid it out pretty well.

I would add: I don't think I'd trust directions from that manufacturer again. And patience truly is a virtue. After reading post after post here about longer primaries, conditioning, etc. and then experimenting myself, I will join the chorus that says patience!

As a rule, with an average ale, I don't even think about bottling until at least 3 weeks in primary. Why bother? The beer will be in bottles, but it won't be ready any sooner. In fact, many argue it will take even longer as conditioning is slower in bottles.

Yes, it's really really hard to wait. You must wait for fermenting to be complete of course, but if you rush the rest of the process you'll end up with greener, cloudier beer that will only be okay and will probably contribute to some serious gastro-intestinal fireworks and have you giggling to yourself as you search "farting" on these forums. (Not that I would know!)

Anyway, good luck and welcome to the hobby!

__________________
Redpiper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 03:42 PM   #8
strat_thru_marshall
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Oklahoma City
Posts: 1,679
Liked 28 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 32

Default

4 days is too short.

Leave it in for two to three weeks. Bottle, leave it in bottles for two to three weeks. chill and drink.

Is this the best way? Maybe maybe not. Is it a good way to do things until you get some more experience, understand what your yeast need and want, understand gravity readings and what they mean, and develop a feel for brewing? Yes.

__________________
strat_thru_marshall is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 03:52 PM   #9
BrewDocND
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Farmington, CT
Posts: 165
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I'm only 20-25 batches into my brewing career and the biggest improvements I've made are temp control and patience.

Like others have said, wait 3 weeks until you check gravity. Those first few batches are hard to wait on, but once you start to get into a groove you won't even want to look at the fermentor for a couple weeks (well, maybe just check to make sure the airlock isn't gunked up).

I actually planned ahead this year and brewed twice right before leaving for x-mas vacation, so I could bottle when I got back.

__________________

Kegged- Scottish Heavy (first kegged batch and I didn't f#&% it up!)
Bottled- Belgian Dubbel (Brewing Classic Styles).
Bottled- French Saison (BCS) Bottled March 17.
Belgian Pale with JP dregs Bottled Feb 3.
Dumped- 1.5 gallons Dubbel on orval/JP dregs colonized by fruit flies :(

BrewDocND is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-27-2011, 04:00 PM   #10
rijtjeshuis
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Toronto, ON
Posts: 13
Default

I'm going to pick up on what Revvy was saying as well... One thing you haven't mentioned is wether or not you're doing only one fermentation, or if you'll be transfering to a secondary as well.

Though you don't technically need to transfer to a secondary to make beer, your brew will benefit immensely if you siphon it into a second container to ferment, making sure not to include the trub that collects at the bottom. This not only improves clarity, but will generally get rid of a number of flavors that taste like dirt and badness.

In my experience, you'll need to wait about 2 WEEKS for primary fermentation. Of course, that's just a ballpark and the best way to make sure this stage is done is to make sure you get two gravity readings three days apart that are the same. Then transfer to secondary for another 2 WEEKS. After that, you can prime and bottle and wait another 10 DAYS.

Some beers take much longer, mind you. If you want to make a gueuze, for example, you're looking at YEARS! But for what you're doing, a month and a half would seem to be okay.

__________________
rijtjeshuis is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How long is long enough for a long primary weizen? TVarmy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 03-16-2010 03:37 PM
Ales Aging in the Refrigerator Octang Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 09-07-2009 10:32 PM
Secondaries For Ales? coryforsenate Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 07-21-2009 03:32 AM
How do you get the red in Irish ales MESmith Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 02-28-2008 11:36 PM
Pilsner ales Jack Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 09-27-2006 09:54 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS