Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How to get a total of 5 gallons.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-17-2009, 11:52 PM   #1
Q2XL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eastpointe, Michigan
Posts: 514
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default How to get a total of 5 gallons.

Noob question here.....I have been reading that to get a total of 5 gallons when you are finished with your beer, you should start off with 5.5 gallons in the carboy.

Is it ok to just add the extra .5 gallon of water for a total of 2.5 gallons of wort added to 3 gallons of water already in the carboy? Does the extra .5 gallon dilute the final product in any way?

Being a begiiner sometimes I over analyze things.

__________________
Q2XL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-17-2009, 11:56 PM   #2
The Blow Leprechaun
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Rockville, MD
Posts: 602
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Yes it dilutes... how much depends on the gravity you start with, I know Promash can calculate it for you.

As for if it's okay... sure! If you don't have a problem with the amount it dilutes, go ahead.

Make sure you boil the water before adding it, not just to sanitize, but to drive the oxygen out of it.

__________________
The Blow Leprechaun is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 12:03 AM   #3
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,591
Liked 4343 Times on 3158 Posts
Likes Given: 845

Default

If you're making your own recipes, you can scale them up to 5.5 gallons. If you're buying a kit that makes 5 gallons, though, I wouldn't add water to it. I mean, you're just watering down good beer. I'd rather have 4.75 gallons of a great beer than 5 gallons of the same stuff watered down.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 12:34 AM   #4
Q2XL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eastpointe, Michigan
Posts: 514
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
If you're making your own recipes, you can scale them up to 5.5 gallons. If you're buying a kit that makes 5 gallons, though, I wouldn't add water to it. I mean, you're just watering down good beer. I'd rather have 4.75 gallons of a great beer than 5 gallons of the same stuff watered down.

Excellent point.
__________________
Q2XL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 12:37 AM   #5
Edcculus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 4,567
Liked 40 Times on 37 Posts

Default

Going along with what Yooper said. 5 gallons isn't a magic number.

__________________
Edcculus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 02:07 AM   #6
EddieWess
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Conifer, Colorado
Posts: 64
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edcculus View Post
Going along with what Yooper said. 5 gallons isn't a magic number.
I agree. The batch I bottled last night was between 4.5 and 4.75 gallons and I still ended up with 2 cases of 12 ouncers.

Problem is I don't know how it ended up short. I use 2 - 2.5 gallon containers of store bought water when I brew (on account of we have a reverse osmosis filtration system) and I didn't have any blow off on this brew so I've no idea where the rest of the beer went to.
__________________
EddieWess is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 11:43 AM   #7
JPicasso
Hackbrewer extraordinaire
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JPicasso's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Arlington Heights, IL
Posts: 418
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

When you boil for an hour, you'll get some water boiled off.
So if you start with 5 gallons exactly, you'll end up with less.

My turkey fryer pot can boil 5 gallons, if I watch it like a hawk, but 5.5 gallons can be troublesome.
I guess I"ll be the only one to say that yes, I top off with frozen boiled water when I've cooled to about 80.
I like the beer to be at exactly 5 gallon mark in primary. Which gives me slightly less than 5 gallons after I bottle.

__________________
JPicasso is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 11:48 AM   #8
Laughing_Gnome_Invisible
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 12,085
Liked 510 Times on 393 Posts
Likes Given: 76

Default

Before you decide if you want to top up, check your hydro reading against your target OG. You may have some wiggle room for a top up and still be on target.

__________________

Steven Hawking ~ As we say in science, the England football team couldn’t hit a cow’s arse with a banjo


Last edited by Laughing_Gnome_Invisible; 02-18-2009 at 11:59 AM.
Laughing_Gnome_Invisible is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2009, 11:56 AM   #9
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,591
Liked 4343 Times on 3158 Posts
Likes Given: 845

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laughing_Gnome_Invisible View Post
Before you decide if you want to top up, check your hydro reading against your target SG. You may have some wiggle room for a top up and still be on target.
Very good point. More important than the exact volume is hitting the OG of the recipe. If you take the SG, and it's a little high, you can add a bit of water. I probably wouldn't bother adding more, but as the Gnome said, that would be something to consider if you're thinking of adding water to increase the volume.

Even if you have exactly five gallons in the fermenter, there will be some losses due to the trub at the bottom. Spent yeast, coagulated proteins, hop particles and other products of fermentation will fall to the bottom and compact into a thick cake on the bottom. Sometimes it's several inches thick. When you rack (siphon) the beer from the fermenter into the bottling bucket, you'll leave all of that gunk behind and just rack off the nice clear beer. That's usually where you experience the volume loss. It's not that much, though, so try not to worry about it.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Total Failure Ukfan369 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 31 11-27-2010 02:25 AM
total noobie here drobbins Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 08-17-2007 10:16 PM
Total Bummer ScubaSteve Bottling/Kegging 4 07-14-2007 01:29 PM
Boiling all 5 gallons vs. using just 1.5 gallons of water rockout Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 05-10-2007 08:04 PM
Total N00b! TheMoose Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 16 07-18-2006 01:21 PM