Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How do you do a full boil?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-04-2012, 01:17 PM   #31
passedpawn
Waste Allocation Load Lifter - Earth Class
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
passedpawn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: ☼ Clearwater, FL ☼
Posts: 19,871
Liked 3704 Times on 2278 Posts
Likes Given: 3208

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by metanoia View Post
Dang, that's crazy. Would one of the 1oz bottles be good to keep around so you can use the dropper, or is there an easy way to extract just a few drops from the big half litre bottle?
Yes, keep one of the bottles. Or, you can buy 2oz bottles from Cynmar (they have a great cheap supply of all kinds of lab equipment).

This stuff does't last me as long as other say. I like to drive a hard boil I guess because I do need to use more than a few drops.
__________________
Am I Insane or do I really see Heaven in Your Eyes?
passedpawn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-04-2012, 01:38 PM   #32
StressedPenguin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
StressedPenguin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: , North Carolina
Posts: 50
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

This thread is generally related to a very stupid question I have, but in the last two batches (my first two) I have always gotten boil overs. Some trouble immediately after adding hops, but it continues the whole time. I never reach a hot break point where the foam recedes.

I know what the concept of hotbreak is and I know extract brewing has very very little of it most of the time because of the original boil of LME, but I feel like I am either missing something or have the heat way too high and the bubbles just keep coming up. The bubbles are much thinner than others' videos describing the hot break, more of a foam you get when you boil pasta too hot and it keeps rising up. My common sense is telling me since the extract has little proteins that need to drop the foam I see really is just boiling it with the gas too high.

I have tried cold water spray bottle, which makes it subside a little bit, but keeps coming back up after a few seconds, and the spoon idea lasts for about 2 seconds before it just spills over the spoon. I have also tried lowering the heat and it keeps bubbling like a boil, but the temperature never increases past 210-ish in the top of the wort.

I hit OG both times, and the first beer was pretty good.

I guess the question is am I doing something wrong? Should I leave the heat on full blast to try and get past this bubbling, or is lowering it once I reach a very strong rolling boil fine? I know I will still end up with beer but I want to improve processes or I will do the same thing forever!

__________________

Primary: Empty!
Kegs: Empty!

Moving to Colorado!

StressedPenguin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-04-2012, 02:25 PM   #33
metanoia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dearborn Heights, Michigan
Posts: 506
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 99

Default

Yeah, don't worry about having the most vigorous boil, especially if you're doing extract batches. Since the malt extract was already boiled before being concentrated, you probably won't get much hot break if any at all (I never did). You're also topping off with water in the fermenter (I'm assuming), so how much you boil off of 3 gallons isn't going to matter a whole lot; if you're doing full boils, usually with all grain, the vigor of the boil relates to how you get the wort boiled down to the right batch size (usually 5.5 gallons) since you don't top off with water.

Also, the wort needs to be boiling, and that is all. It doesn't need to be a raging pot of bubbling and foaming liquid; as long as there is surface movement, the wort is boiling and everything is progressing as it should be. Give yourself a little headspace and it should be fine as long as you don't have the heat on super high.

__________________
Homebrew Power - Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free ebook guide on how to break into homebrewing!
Fermenter: Empty :(
Bottled: Hefe-Vixen, Gingerbread Brown
On Deck: 60 Bells IPA [11/22 brewday]
Thinking about racking to a secondary? Read this first.
metanoia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-04-2012, 04:15 PM   #34
StressedPenguin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
StressedPenguin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: , North Carolina
Posts: 50
Liked 8 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Awesome, thanks! I know it sounded like a dumb question, but in my searches I saw people talking about their boiling temps and various other things that just got me confused. I appreciate the help, even for something so simple sounding!

__________________

Primary: Empty!
Kegs: Empty!

Moving to Colorado!

StressedPenguin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-04-2012, 05:52 PM   #35
metanoia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dearborn Heights, Michigan
Posts: 506
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 99

Default

Everything's simpler than you'd think with brewing, or so I've learned. After a while I realized that must of the brewing process had become second nature, like adjusting boil strength.

Good luck on your future brews.

__________________
Homebrew Power - Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free ebook guide on how to break into homebrewing!
Fermenter: Empty :(
Bottled: Hefe-Vixen, Gingerbread Brown
On Deck: 60 Bells IPA [11/22 brewday]
Thinking about racking to a secondary? Read this first.
metanoia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-15-2012, 02:20 AM   #36
lhommedieu
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 395
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 200

Default

I'm reading this thread with interest because I'm ready for my second home brew and would like to try a full boil method using an extract/steeping method. (My first homebrew turned out great despite every newbie mistake I could have made, lol...)

I'd like to use a 44 quart pot on a propane boiler outside for the boil. Please excuse the questions but I'd really like to get this right the first time.

1. I have John Palmer's "Example Batch" (Port O' Palmer Porter) in mind as the batch I'd like to try. It is the example given in chapter 13 wherein in describes steeping grains as an introduction (i.e. a baby step) to all-grain brewing. He says that for "...best flavor results, the ratio of steeping water to grain should be less than 1 gallon per pound." Does that mean that I would steep my grain(s) in one gallon of 160 degree water, and then remove the grains and add 4 more gallons of water and bring this to a boil before adding my hops according to the recipe schedule?

2. As per the discussion above, add my liquid extract during the last 10 minutes of the boil (instead of at the beginning as per a partial boil).

3. Top off to 5 gallons.

4. Cool wort using a wort chiller to the appropriate temperature for tossing yeast.

5. Take an OG reading.

6. Pour off into primary fermenter and toss yeast.

Best,

Steve

__________________
lhommedieu is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-15-2012, 06:39 AM   #37
metanoia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Dearborn Heights, Michigan
Posts: 506
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts
Likes Given: 99

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lhommedieu View Post
I'm reading this thread with interest because I'm ready for my second home brew and would like to try a full boil method using an extract/steeping method. (My first homebrew turned out great despite every newbie mistake I could have made, lol...)

I'd like to use a 44 quart pot on a propane boiler outside for the boil. Please excuse the questions but I'd really like to get this right the first time.

1. I have John Palmer's "Example Batch" (Port O' Palmer Porter) in mind as the batch I'd like to try. It is the example given in chapter 13 wherein in describes steeping grains as an introduction (i.e. a baby step) to all-grain brewing. He says that for "...best flavor results, the ratio of steeping water to grain should be less than 1 gallon per pound." Does that mean that I would steep my grain(s) in one gallon of 160 degree water, and then remove the grains and add 4 more gallons of water and bring this to a boil before adding my hops according to the recipe schedule?

2. As per the discussion above, add my liquid extract during the last 10 minutes of the boil (instead of at the beginning as per a partial boil).

3. Top off to 5 gallons.

4. Cool wort using a wort chiller to the appropriate temperature for tossing yeast.

5. Take an OG reading.

6. Pour off into primary fermenter and toss yeast.

Best,

Steve
1. Add more than 4 gallons of water after steeping the grains; bring it up to about 6.5-7 gallons so that once you boil for an hour you end up at 5.5 gallons (adjust the vigor of your boil to hit this mark).

2. You can add it all at the end. With extract I usually add 1/3 to 1/2 at the beginning of the boiling, then the rest at the end.

3. See #1.

4. Yes.

5. Why not. The biggest reason not to with extract is because the added water can cause inaccurate readings. If you do a full boil, I don't see why an OG reading would be that far off.

6. Make sure you properly aerate before/after pitching the yeast. The yeast needs lots of oxygen to get started on eating all those sugars.
__________________
Homebrew Power - Sign up for our newsletter and receive a free ebook guide on how to break into homebrewing!
Fermenter: Empty :(
Bottled: Hefe-Vixen, Gingerbread Brown
On Deck: 60 Bells IPA [11/22 brewday]
Thinking about racking to a secondary? Read this first.
metanoia is offline
lhommedieu Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-15-2012, 01:56 PM   #38
lhommedieu
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 395
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 200

Default

Thanks for the response. Two more questions:

1. If I start with a 6.5 - 7 gallon boil, my aim is to get the liquid level down to 5.5 gallons. Once there, do I continue to boil until my OG is where I want it? I would think, for example, that the OG at 5.5 gallons is slightly lower than the OG at 5 gallons, since the sugars would be diluted. I guess that I am worried that I would destroy the effect of the hops if I boil for too long.

2. Palmer's recipe calls for 3 different malts; do I just steep these together in the same bag?

Best,

Steve

__________________
lhommedieu is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-15-2012, 02:01 PM   #39
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,861
Liked 4938 Times on 3578 Posts
Likes Given: 995

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lhommedieu View Post
Thanks for the response. Two more questions:

1. If I start with a 6.5 - 7 gallon boil, my aim is to get the liquid level down to 5.5 gallons. Once there, do I continue to boil until my OG is where I want it? I would think, for example, that the OG at 5.5 gallons is slightly lower than the OG at 5 gallons, since the sugars would be diluted. I guess that I am worried that I would destroy the effect of the hops if I boil for too long.

2. Palmer's recipe calls for 3 different malts; do I just steep these together in the same bag?

Best,

Steve
1. I'd start with about 5.5-6 gallons since you don't know what you're going to boil off the first time. You can still top off to 5 gallons if you boil off more than you think, but you can't take it out! When you get a rolling boil going, add your first hops and set the timer for an hour and finish the boil at the right time. The hops are what are timed, so that's the important thing. Or you can do a test boil- boil water for an hour and measure how much you boiled off. Your boil off will be the same with wort or with water, so then you'll know how much to start with.

3. Yes. Put them loosely in the bag, so that they are not packed in. Use more than one bag if you need to.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
lhommedieu Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-15-2012, 04:21 PM   #40
lhommedieu
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 395
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 200

Default

Thanks! Test boiling is a great idea, since this will be the first time that I've used the pot and propane boiler. Some of this will have to be done by "feel" of course since I'll find that spot on the boiler that gives me the kind of boil that I want - and then hold it for an hour.

__________________
lhommedieu is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
full 5 gal boil - recipe calls for 2.5 gal boil - hops ammounts? vthokie98 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 12-10-2012 09:40 PM
half batch full boil same as full batch partial boil? Firechicken Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 10-15-2012 10:53 PM
Full Boil Extract Boil with question on batch volumes tjashing Extract Brewing 11 05-02-2012 04:19 PM
What adjustment should I make to hops for full boil vs. partial boil? DaveAllen Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 18 03-15-2010 03:46 AM
Question about water amount in full boil or partial boil neldred Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 10-17-2009 04:50 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS