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Old 11-18-2012, 11:48 AM   #1
lhommedieu
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Default How do I avoid over-carbonating my beer?

I kegged my beer last night in a corny keg, by sealing the lid at 30 psi and then lowering the psi to 15. The beer is in the fridge at 35 degrees F with the CO2 attached.

I won't be back to my house for 3 days and was wondering if I have set the psi to the correct pressure? Should I merely start tasting the beer after 3 days at 15 psi and disconnect the CO2 once it's reached the desired level of carbonation, or is there a formula for computing psi/volume/temperature/time?

Best,

Steve

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Old 11-18-2012, 11:57 AM   #2
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Yeah I'd just leave it on the gas cold generally take about a week or two to reach good carbonation but you won't over carb that way.

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Old 11-18-2012, 12:04 PM   #3
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The pressure you set will depend on the temp the beer is at and the volumes of CO2 you want. I do the set and forget method and keep mine to 10 psi

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Old 11-18-2012, 12:49 PM   #4
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Here's a table that will help.

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Old 11-18-2012, 03:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bioguy
Here's a table that will help.
Good chart. I have the same chart printed one out and taped to the side of my kegerator
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Old 11-19-2012, 12:58 AM   #6
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Thanks for the chart.

I'm interpreting it to mean that if I want to carbonate my Irish Red Ale at 2.47, then I set my psi at 10 if the temperature is 36 degrees F.

From what I've read so far it should take about 2 weeks to fully carbonate - is that correct? Is there any way of computing exactly how long it should take given "x" amount of beer? lol - I guess you can figure out that I'd like to taste the beer. It'd had been in the primary for 4 weeks, so I don't think that it's green.

Best,

Steve

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Old 11-19-2012, 02:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhommedieu View Post
Thanks for the chart.

I'm interpreting it to mean that if I want to carbonate my Irish Red Ale at 2.47, then I set my psi at 10 if the temperature is 36 degrees F.

From what I've read so far it should take about 2 weeks to fully carbonate - is that correct? Is there any way of computing exactly how long it should take given "x" amount of beer? lol - I guess you can figure out that I'd like to taste the beer. It'd had been in the primary for 4 weeks, so I don't think that it's green.

Best,

Steve
You are reading it correctly. I can never wait either, so I use a mix of set and forget and force carbonation. I cool the beer down in the fridge over night. Then I attach the gas and dial the pressure up to 30 psi, lay the keg on its side and rock it back and forth with my foot until I can't hear bubbles going in any more. Then I sit the thing upright and disconnect the gas and attach a tap. Bleed off pressure and then tap a pitcher of foam (usually winds up being about a pint). This usually brings the pressure under 10 psi. Then I attach the gas at the pressure on the chart overnight. It is good to go the next day.
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