Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How to cool wort all the way to pitching temps??

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-18-2013, 04:30 PM   #1
Ryan11
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Baytown, TX
Posts: 86
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default How to cool wort all the way to pitching temps??

When using my wort chiller I can only cool down to about 75-80 degrees. How can I get my wort down to like 60 degrees. I don't feel like purchasing a different chiller right now but I do have a tempereature controled freezer. Once I get my wort down to 75-80 degrees could I just stick it in my freezer until I reach 60 degrees then pitch my yeast or would the time it takes to reach that hurt the wort? I've always heard the faster you can get to pitching temps the better.

__________________
Ryan11 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:33 PM   #2
sweed
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Salem, NH
Posts: 957
Liked 110 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

I get mine down to 100-110 degrees, then dump it in my fermenter with some cold water in it and it gets down to that 70-75 degress, which is fine for pitching. You dont need to get it down to 60*.

__________________
sweed is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:36 PM   #3
duboman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Glenview, IL
Posts: 5,997
Liked 452 Times on 421 Posts
Likes Given: 201

Default

You can either place the vessel in an ice bath along with using the chiller or yes, you can place the vessel in the freezer until the temp gets to where you want it and then pitch the yeast, just be sure the vessel is sealed up so no nasties get in there while it's cooling down.

Good for you on taking care of your yeast!

__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010
duboman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:42 PM   #4
unionrdr
Wannabe author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 27,962
Liked 1852 Times on 1633 Posts
Likes Given: 1324

Default

With some yeasts,getting down low temp wise is necessary for it to start in the normal amount of time. Or for the yeast to produce a cleaner flavor. Like the WLP029 German ale/kolsh yeast I pitched on two beers this week. It gets sluggish at 62F or lower. But at 65F,it chugs along slow & even. At 68F,it chugs along merrily at a medium pace. It's temp range is 65-69F. That's just one example.
Cooper's ale yeast is about the same. At 63F,it will start to work,but sluggishly so. Below that,it'll go dormant. At 64F,it starts to wake up & go to work,but slowly. US-05 can go down to like 57F,so 60-62F will be very clean with that one. But it'll still give a clean flavor quality at 70 or 72F.
Saison yeasts & wheat beer yeast can do well at higher temps to finish them. Wheat beer yeast gives banana marshmellow candy flavor to me at higher temps. Hope these help a little.
__________________
Everything works if ya let it-Roady(meatloaf)
My new book is on Amazon Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3MCU0W
unionrdr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:46 PM   #5
Cbaddad
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 541
Liked 105 Times on 73 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

Go to the hardware store and get a small coil of copper tubing, some hose clamps and tubing. Make a prechiller with this stuff. Set it in a small pot with an ice bath. My buddies and I had the same situation and started using the prechiller. We didn't add ice until we got it down to about 90. Dropping it down those last 20 degrees can be the hardest if your tap water isn't super cold. I know you said you didn't want to get aother chiller, but this would only cost about $15 or so.

__________________
Cbaddad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:50 PM   #6
brewinchef_fairfax
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
brewinchef_fairfax's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 197
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts

Default

Because it is winter here - the water from the faucet is plenty cold to get it to pitch temps in about 30 minutes. All I do is run cold water in the sink for a while and change it every 10 minutes.

A keg tub full of ice water would do the same thing if your water isn't that cold.
Last batch I just poured it in the primary and set it outside covered and let it cool down before I pitched. Worked like a charm.

__________________
brewinchef_fairfax is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:52 PM   #7
Xpertskir
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Morgantown, Wv
Posts: 1,966
Liked 366 Times on 242 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweed View Post
I get mine down to 100-110 degrees, then dump it in my fermenter with some cold water in it and it gets down to that 70-75 degress, which is fine for pitching. You dont need to get it down to 60*.
Dont listen to this.


Dont pitch your yeast until its at the temperature you want to start fermenting at. I start the fermentation of pretty much all of the yeasts I use at 60 or even 55 for a few strains(like kolsch yeast).

In the summer when ground water is warm, I do just what you say, chill it to mid 70's and then use my ferm freezer to get it the rest of the way prior to pitching.

Waiting a long time to pitch post brewing can be problematic as it gives non yeast organisms time to get established, but if you use proper cleaning/sanitation protocols you can minimize the risk. Pitching at too high a temperature on the other hand is a guarantee of subpar beer.
__________________
Xpertskir is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 04:55 PM   #8
aiptasia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Them Scary Woods, FL
Posts: 3,517
Liked 527 Times on 468 Posts
Likes Given: 162

Default

I like the chaka avatar.

Ice baths in conjunction with a wort chiller will get you there. That, or you can leave a bunch of loops of hose in a small mini fridge or drop freezer and pass the coil water through it first before it hits your IC. There are a ton of aquarium people that make their own re circulation chillers in such a way.

As long as you're getting within ten degrees of the yeast starter to your pitching temperature, you're not going to unduly stress the yeast.

__________________
Paranormal Brewing
Beer so good, it's frightening.

2014: Seven Heavens Series One: Vilon, Mystic Melomel, Skeeter Pee.
aiptasia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 05:37 PM   #9
Pie_Man
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Pie_Man's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,342
Liked 131 Times on 123 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

I imagine the temperature of your ground water is similiar to mine here in Florida, so I understand your situation. A wort chilling system is limited by the temperature of the water being input into the system, meaning you're not going to cool your wort to 60F with 80F tap water.

I do exactly what you've proposed. I cool my wort to 75-80 degrees with my chiller, transfer to a carboy, then place it in my temperature controlled fridge to cool it the rest of the way which usually takes several hours. I often leave it overnight if I'm brewing a lager. I cover the carboy opening with 2-3 layers of paper towels dampened with starsan and secured with a rubber band to prevent any contaminants from contacting the wort. When the wort has reached the lower end of the yeast's temperature range, I pitch my yeast and aerate. Yes, rapidly cooling your wort can be important, but your wort is safe at the 80F temp range to cool slowly the extra 20 degrees, or so.

Other options include the pre-chiller method mentioned earlier, or a really large ice bath. I personnaly avoid those methods simply because I don't feel like purchasing ice for every batch when I already have a temperature controlled fridge. I hope this helps.

__________________
Pie_Man is offline
iaefebs Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2013, 05:41 PM   #10
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,566
Liked 254 Times on 206 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

Permanent Solution: Move north and buy a house with a deep well! My groundwater comes out at 50F in the winter and 60F in the summer. I Tapped in a faucet in my yard next to the well head so I can get water coming right out of the 380' deep well in August that is still cool!

Easiest solution: Get a second immersion chiller and run your water through it first with the first chiller placed in an ice bath and the second placed in your wort....instantly your cooling water is in the 40's or 50's entering the wort!

__________________

Next up: American Brown Ale
Primary 1&2:
Primary 3&4:
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Quick cool down before pitching? bfinleyui Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 11-29-2012 03:10 PM
If wort gets too cool - is it ok to wait before pitching? dmaxdmax Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 27 04-09-2012 02:45 PM
Cool yeast before pitching? brewstaedt Fermentation & Yeast 2 03-05-2012 06:31 PM
Using ice to cool wort to pitching temp. azlane Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 12-30-2010 02:02 PM
Cool That Wort!! Cool That Wort!! What Works For You? shagington All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 37 10-20-2008 07:29 PM