Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How can I minimize oxidation
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-12-2012, 05:31 PM   #1
jkendrick
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 152
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts

Default How can I minimize oxidation

I am just starting to drink my first homebrew. It's been in bottles for about three and a half weeks. It's an IPA from a kit and I left it in the primary for three weeks and bottled without a secondary. I definitely wasn't as organized as I should have been, but things went pretty smoothly. The beer is definitely drinkable, but has that stale, cardboardy taste that is often attributed to oxidation. It's not overpowering, but it's definitely there. I'm not sure what I might have done to cause this, so I'm wondering if there are "typical" beginner mistakes that lead to this. I searched around a bit, but didn't find a specific answer.

My next beer (a stout) is currently in the primary and I will transfer this to a secondary at three weeks. The initial brew went much smoother on this one, but I intentionally aerated the wort before pitching the yeast as per the recipe. Does the bad oxidation come from transfer to secondary or bottling stages?

__________________
jkendrick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:35 PM   #2
duboman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Glenview, IL
Posts: 6,219
Liked 488 Times on 452 Posts
Likes Given: 214

Default

What is your process of transfer? If you are stirring or pouring or actively introducing air into your beer those are primary causes. In addition, if there is too much head space in the secondary that can also cause oxidation if left that way too long

__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010
duboman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:35 PM   #3
HibsMax
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Westford, MA
Posts: 274
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

One way to reduce the risk is to leave your brew in the primary rather than racking to a secondary.

I am new but I have already got into the (lazy) trend of not using a secondary unless I have to (adding something like fruit, etc).

__________________
HibsMax is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:41 PM   #4
homebrewdad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 3,080
Liked 333 Times on 246 Posts
Likes Given: 230

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkendrick View Post
I am just starting to drink my first homebrew. It's been in bottles for about three and a half weeks. It's an IPA from a kit and I left it in the primary for three weeks and bottled without a secondary. I definitely wasn't as organized as I should have been, but things went pretty smoothly. The beer is definitely drinkable, but has that stale, cardboardy taste that is often attributed to oxidation. It's not overpowering, but it's definitely there. I'm not sure what I might have done to cause this, so I'm wondering if there are "typical" beginner mistakes that lead to this. I searched around a bit, but didn't find a specific answer.

My next beer (a stout) is currently in the primary and I will transfer this to a secondary at three weeks. The initial brew went much smoother on this one, but I intentionally aerated the wort before pitching the yeast as per the recipe. Does the bad oxidation come from transfer to secondary or bottling stages?
Bad oxidation comes from splashing and such after fermentation is done. Don't pour when you transfer the beer - siphon it. Keep bubbles out when you transfer.

Keep your fermenter sealed and don't disturb it or the beer too much when fermenting.

Same thing, be careful when bottling, don't let the beer splash or such.
__________________
Homebrew Dad - blogging about making my own beer and raising a lot of kids.
Check out the priming sugar calculator and the beer calorie calculator.

Fermenting: nothing
Lagering: Swarthy Satyr (traditional bock)
Bottled: Royal Goblin (Hoppy Hobgoblin rendition), Treasure Type "T" (oatmeal toffee stout), Enchantress (big Irish red ale), Frostfire (Oktoberfest), Thundersmoke brown ale
homebrewdad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:45 PM   #5
jkendrick
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 152
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts

Default

Yeah, I used an auto-siphon. My wife was helping and she let it "fart" once, but I didn't think that would be a big deal. But, as I said, it isn't overpoweringly off tasting, but I can taste the stale taste. Maybe that was enough.

__________________
jkendrick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:48 PM   #6
Draken
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Matthews, NC
Posts: 415
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts

Default

That's not enough. Can you explain your brewing and bottling process so others might identify the issue?

__________________
Draken is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:48 PM   #7
homebrewdad
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 3,080
Liked 333 Times on 246 Posts
Likes Given: 230

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkendrick View Post
Yeah, I used an auto-siphon. My wife was helping and she let it "fart" once, but I didn't think that would be a big deal. But, as I said, it isn't overpoweringly off tasting, but I can taste the stale taste. Maybe that was enough.
Auto siphons are awesome, but they are prone to let bubbles in - if this is happening, pour a little sanitized water in the top of the outer tube. This will give you a vacuum seal, and won't let air bubbles in.
__________________
Homebrew Dad - blogging about making my own beer and raising a lot of kids.
Check out the priming sugar calculator and the beer calorie calculator.

Fermenting: nothing
Lagering: Swarthy Satyr (traditional bock)
Bottled: Royal Goblin (Hoppy Hobgoblin rendition), Treasure Type "T" (oatmeal toffee stout), Enchantress (big Irish red ale), Frostfire (Oktoberfest), Thundersmoke brown ale
homebrewdad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 05:54 PM   #8
jkendrick
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 152
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts

Default

Draken, I used the auto-siphon to move from the primary to a bottling bucket. I started the siphon with a bit of StarSan. As I said, there was one minor hiccup in the transfer. From there, I immediately bottled. For bottling, I simply sanitized each bottle and then put it up to the bottling bucket's spigot and filled and capped. Is that enough info?

Thanks for the help, everyone!

__________________
jkendrick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 06:04 PM   #9
jazzbass
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wadsworth, Ohio
Posts: 61
Default

I am not sure why you would need the star san to start you autosiphon.

I bet you introduced oxygen by your bottling technique.

Get yourself a spring loaded bottle filler.

http://www.thegrape.net/browse.cfm/b...ad/4,7834.html

For your stout I would go right to the bottle at 3 or 4 weeks.

__________________

Up Next: ?????
Primary: Oatmeal Stout,Blood Orange Hefeweizen
Secondary:
Bottled : Christmas Ale
Light Ale
Oatmeal Stout
Cream Ale
Dortmunder
Robust Porter
Black Cherry Ale
Light Lager
Milk Stout
Brown Ale
Amber Cervesa

jazzbass is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2012, 06:05 PM   #10
Draken
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Matthews, NC
Posts: 415
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkendrick
Draken, I used the auto-siphon to move from the primary to a bottling bucket. I started the siphon with a bit of StarSan. As I said, there was one minor hiccup in the transfer. From there, I immediately bottled. For bottling, I simply sanitized each bottle and then put it up to the bottling bucket's spigot and filled and capped. Is that enough info?

Thanks for the help, everyone!
Did you splash the wort when it was hot?
Did you fill your bottling bucket from the bottom or did you let it splash in?
Sounds like you don't have a bottle filler so did you pour down the side of the bottle or just let it splash down the top?
__________________
Draken is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oxidation OrvilleOrdinary Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 36 01-24-2014 03:56 PM
How to minimize trub in secondary/bottles? bbriscoe Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 12-09-2010 06:39 PM
Why minimize splashing when transferring wort from mash/sparge/etc? jigidyjim Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 03-06-2010 02:44 PM
Oxidation Seeves1982 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 11 07-23-2009 06:37 PM
Oxidation? Aubie Stout Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-25-2008 06:20 AM