Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How to accomplish 2-stage fermentation
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-18-2008, 05:13 PM   #1
eurc51
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 44
Default How to accomplish 2-stage fermentation

I've done two beers so far - an IPA and an Irish Red Ale - both beginner brews and my kit with glass carboy and plastic bottling bucket has sufficed. Now, I'm interested in doing more advanced beers such as a Belgian Dubbel that call for 2-stage fermentation. So, my question is: can I do this with what I have i.e. 6-gallon glass carboy and 7 gallon bottling bucket. If so, what is the best approach. If not, do I need another carboy?

Thanks

__________________
eurc51 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2008, 05:19 PM   #2
Evan!
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Evan!'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 11,901
Liked 70 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

It's not really "2-stage fermentation", and you don't really "need" a secondary tank, but it helps. The term "secondary fermenter" is a misnomer actually. There's really no fermentation going on in the secondary vessel. It just allows for some bulk conditioning, as well as for more solids to fall out of suspension resulting in clearer beer. But even a belgian dubbel can be done without a secondary.

If you were to secondary in your bottling bucket, then once you added your priming solution and stirred the beer, it would rouse all the sediment that had been falling out of suspension and cloudy up your beer again. You COULD do it without any extra equipment, but there'd be one extra racking step, which increases your chances of oxidation and contamination. But it could be done:

  1. Primary fermentation in carboy for 7-10 days or whenever gravity stops dropping.
  2. Rack to bottling bucket, age for 2 weeks or more.
  3. Rack back to original sanitized carboy leaving the settled trub in the bottom of the bucket.
  4. Clean and sanitize the bucket, add cooled priming solution, rack beer from carboy back into bottling bucket for bottling.

It's kind of a roundabout way, but it'd work. Ideally, you should have a dozen carboys and/or buckets, like I do.
__________________
MOSS HOLLOW BREWING CO.
Aristocratic Ales, Lascivious Lagers


.planned:
•Scottish 80/- •Sweet Stout •Roggenbier
.primary | bright:
98: Moss Hollow Soured '09 72: Oude Kriek 99: B-Weisse 102: Brett'd BDSA 104: Feat of Strength Helles Bock 105: Merkin Brown
.on tap | kegged:
XX: Moss Hollow Springs Sparkling Water 95: Gott Mit Uns German Pils 91b: Brown Willie's Oaked Abbey Ale 103: Merkin Stout
98: Yorkshire Special 100: Maple Porter 89: Cidre Saison 101: Steffiweizen '09 (#3)
Evan! is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2008, 05:43 PM   #3
hefeweizen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 55
Default

You could perform your primary in the plastic bucket. Then to the carboy for "secondary" and then back the plastic bucket with the priming solution for bottling. I am still new to this so correct me if I am missing something.

Good Luck.

-Ron

__________________
hefeweizen is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2008, 05:57 PM   #4
JamesKY
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 85
Default

That's what I usually do Hefe. It's much easier to clean all of the primary fermentation sediment from the bottom of a plastic bucket than it is from the inside of a glass carboy. As Evan said though, every time you rack the beer, you expose it to infection but as long as you're careful and use proper sanitation procedures, you shouldn't run into much trouble.

__________________
JamesKY is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-18-2008, 07:06 PM   #5
CBBaron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CBBaron's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 2,787
Liked 6 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eurc51
I've done two beers so far - an IPA and an Irish Red Ale - both beginner brews and my kit with glass carboy and plastic bottling bucket has sufficed. Now, I'm interested in doing more advanced beers such as a Belgian Dubbel that call for 2-stage fermentation. So, my question is: can I do this with what I have i.e. 6-gallon glass carboy and 7 gallon bottling bucket. If so, what is the best approach. If not, do I need another carboy?

Thanks
Belgian Dubbels do not use a 2-stage fermentation. However most big beers benefit from extended conditioning and clearing in a "secondary". It is not required but may produce better results with big beers.
I tend to think you need another carboy or fermentation bucket or 2 so that you can have more than one batch brewing at a time. Your normal strength beers should spend about 3 weeks in a fermenter before bottling, big beers can benefit from an extra month or so in a secondary. With multiple fermenters you can brew more often and build up a stash of beer so you can allow your beers to properly condition in the bottle.
Craig
__________________
CBBaron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is two-stage fermentation? grace1760 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 02-18-2010 01:20 AM
One-stage fermentation Winesburg Ale General Techniques 11 12-05-2007 02:23 PM
Second fermentation stage BobbieDigital Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 08-07-2007 03:06 PM
Two v. One Stage Fermentation IloveIPA Equipment/Sanitation 6 02-24-2007 03:26 PM
Two stage fermentation.... yamaha450 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 01-09-2007 01:23 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS