Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > hopps pellets leaving the bag

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-10-2013, 03:01 AM   #1
kenzie1051
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default hopps pellets leaving the bag

hey. newbie here going straight into grain brewing. makin a blond ale.. kit from morebeer.com, the hopps came in pellet form... i think next time ill put my own together and make sure im getting flowers right? im pretty sure theres no hole in the bag.. im assuming the pellets just brake down too much... or is it cuz im usin g my grain bag for my hopps bag? or the combo of both things...

think it will effect anything? im just gonna strain in into the fermenter... not sure with what though... if the grain bag isnt catchin it all..

hope i didnt make any classic nube poster mistakes... thx for taking the time to read my problems!

there was def a few other bumps along my first brew ride here, hopefully the next one will go smoother, its a smoked scotch ale.

dsc02588.jpg  
__________________
kenzie1051 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-10-2013, 03:48 AM   #2
ak_hop
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ak_hop's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Palmer, Alaska
Posts: 50
Default

That looks more like hot break material. You could use Irish moss or worlflock for the last 15 mins. of the boil. Also a whirlpool is a great way to separate it. Stir it slowly and let it sit about 15-30 mins, Using both is a great advantage.

__________________
ak_hop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-10-2013, 04:01 AM   #3
eltorrente
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: baltimore, md
Posts: 494
Liked 60 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

Don't even bother using a bag to contain the hops. No need to use flower hops when you are using them for boil/flavor.

It doesn't matter AT ALL if the hops get into your fermenter from the kettle after the boil. Zero impact on flavor, and nothing to worry about. Having a bag in the boil and trying to contain them and filter them is just completely unnecessary - seriously.

The only time you may want to consider using flower hops is when dry hopping. Even then, many people use pellet hops for dry hops and get great results.

There are advantages to using pellet hops in the boil. First of all, utilization and consistency. You can count on the pellet hops being fully utilized in the wort, because they break apart and the full surface area is exposed. They also don't soak up the wort like flower hops do. They are easier to work with overall.

The only time you should use flower hops is in dry hopping (maybe). If you use them for dry hopping, remember that it sucks to clean a carboy out with a bunch of soaked dry hops in it. I only started using flower hops for dry hopping when I switched to kegs, because it was easy to clean.

Stick with pellet hops, and forget the bag. Don't think twice about them going into your fermenter. If anything, they will help the flavor - they will never hurt it.

__________________
eltorrente is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-10-2013, 04:50 AM   #4
kenzie1051
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

thx eltorrente i feel a lot better about the hops. useful info as well ill stick to pellet.

ak hop - the layer of material is much thicker and greener then it looks and it happened shortly after i put the hops in. but i want to know more about this hot break material and figure out if im dealing with that, and what that means and what to do about it.

thx your input guys.

__________________
kenzie1051 is offline
TheBrahmanBrewer Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-10-2013, 05:05 AM   #5
eltorrente
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: baltimore, md
Posts: 494
Liked 60 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

Hot break is proteins that have coagulated and dropped out of solution during the first stages of the boil. This material becomes part of the "trub", that you have heard so many horror stories about in various books.

"Cold break" makes up another part of trub - the rest of it is inactive yeast and fats that have been produced during fermentation. This stuff is what scares new brewers because they hear that it will make their beer taste bad if it comes into contact with their beer in the fermenter.

The fact is, it won't affect your beer at all. Yes - many books talk about it, but it's completely overblown and is not an issue at all. Never use a secondary fermenter because you are afraid of the evil trub touching your beer - you will only introduce oxygen by transferring, and that actually is a bad thing. Leave it in the primary fermenter until you are ready to bottle.

Never worry about filtering your kettle to prevent hot break or cold break going into the fermenter, either - it simply doesn't matter. Seriously. It will just sit on the bottom and form a cake with your hops and yeast.

Your beer will taste great and be clear, and there will be zero effects. The more "break" that is produced, the clearer and better your beer. Doesn't matter if it's sitting in the bottom of your carboy or not. It isn't worth any ounce of effort or worry to try to prevent it from entering your carboy.

__________________
eltorrente is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-11-2013, 02:38 AM   #6
kenzie1051
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

man i sure wish i was able to read your post before i tried to filter the trub and dropped the grain bag into the fermenter... maybe if i was worried about filtering the wort i woulda realized my fermenters spout was open and not lost a half gallon to my kitchen floor...

heh yeah i made a deal of noob mistakes but im more prepared for my next batch now.

thanks again mr. torrent for your simple explanation of hot and cold break and trub and hopps all being a non issue... ill be much more at ease for my second brew and things will probably go much smoother.

__________________
kenzie1051 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-11-2013, 03:11 AM   #7
eltorrente
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: baltimore, md
Posts: 494
Liked 60 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

I should also say that I wish it was easier to filter that stuff out, because if I had the choice - I'd rather just keep it out of my fermenter. Most people at least whirlpool the wort before draining into the kettle, and that can create a cone of material in the center of the kettle, then you can drain around it.

My kettle has a drain valve on it, and I usually just tip the kettle on its side and drain the whole thing in. I used to worry about it, but no more..

__________________
eltorrente is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-11-2013, 10:44 AM   #8
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,461
Liked 707 Times on 594 Posts
Likes Given: 221

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eltorrente View Post
I should also say that I wish it was easier to filter that stuff out, because if I had the choice - I'd rather just keep it out of my fermenter. Most people at least whirlpool the wort before draining into the kettle, and that can create a cone of material in the center of the kettle, then you can drain around it.

My kettle has a drain valve on it, and I usually just tip the kettle on its side and drain the whole thing in. I used to worry about it, but no more..
While that whirlpooling does keep some of the trub out of the fermenter, what most people don't think about is that any liquid left in the boil pot with it is potential beer that is lost. It's just like buying a 12 pack and opening one just to pour it out on the ground. I dump it all into the fermenter because I want all the beer that I made.
__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-11-2013, 11:59 AM   #9
IslandLizard
Progressive Brewing
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
IslandLizard's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pasadena, MD
Posts: 2,476
Liked 281 Times on 256 Posts
Likes Given: 891

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
...I dump it all into the fermenter because I want all the beer that I made.
Don't you end up with sizeable trub losses later, in your fermentor?

I prefer to leave the trub behind in the BK as much as possible. Straining the wort in the BK, by using a screen, is easier than during racking later.

Plus it's easier to harvest the yeast without all that trub mixed in.
__________________
Preparing: Framboise Clone | Raging Bitch Clone #3 | Tank 7 Saison Clone | Fresh Squeezed IPA | Venturing into some Sours, finally...
Fermenting: Belgian Wit | 2'd Clone
Dry hopping:
Barrel Aging: Old Treacle Mine
On tap: Sketchy Bastard | ESB | Belgian Wit {1st place @ FSH Guild Wheat Beer Comp.} | Pocahontas Pumpkin Ale
Kicked: Black Butte Porter Clone | Raging Bitch Clone #2 | Citra Wheat Saison | Rosemary Wheat Saison | Great Lakes Christmas Ale Clone | Caramel Amber Ale
IslandLizard is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-11-2013, 01:21 PM   #10
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,461
Liked 707 Times on 594 Posts
Likes Given: 221

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandLizard View Post
Don't you end up with sizeable trub losses later, in your fermentor?

I prefer to leave the trub behind in the BK as much as possible. Straining the wort in the BK, by using a screen, is easier than during racking later.

Plus it's easier to harvest the yeast without all that trub mixed in.
There shouldn't be much trub loss in the fermenter. The hops will settle first, then the yeast. Given time, that layer will settle pretty compactly with the beer on top. You can't avoid all loss as the yeast/trub layer will still be moist but the loss is as minimal as you can get.
__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
So I've got 3oz of Citra hopps... BW210 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 02-14-2012 02:30 PM
What hopps should i grow? elbastardo Hops Growing 9 03-07-2010 12:42 PM
Albany, NY area: Trade my hop pellets for your Hallertauer pellets Ksosh General Beer Discussion 5 09-21-2009 01:53 PM
cross country hopps hobbsj Hops Growing 0 03-22-2009 04:08 AM
Hopps substitute Onedon Recipes/Ingredients 1 02-09-2006 11:20 PM