The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > honey to bottel

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-07-2012, 01:56 AM   #1
sibs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: germantown, md
Posts: 23
Likes Given: 6

Default honey to bottel

hello i would like to know if u can use honey to bottle your beer ? if so how much honey would i need to used for it to be carbonated ?

ty in advance

__________________
sibs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 02:03 AM   #2
JonM
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JonM's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 4,105
Liked 668 Times on 473 Posts
Likes Given: 44

Default

Plain old sugar is much more reliable, so you might want to stick with that. I hear that different kinds of honey will have different fermentable sugar contents, so it's tricky to figure out how much you'd need based on what kind of honey you have. Corn sugar is much more reliable and easier to figure out.

__________________
Who is this Rorschach guy? And why did he paint so many pictures of my parents fighting?
JonM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 02:07 AM   #3
Golddiggie
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 12,056
Liked 472 Times on 417 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Depending on the honey, you usually use 1.25x the weight in honey that you would normal priming sugar. Use one of the calculation sites to figure out how much sugar to use, or pick "honey" if it has an option. Really, it does depend on what you're bottling, how much you're bottling, temperatures of what you're bottling, etc...

Personally, the 1.25x was pretty reliable for me, when I was bottling with it. Since I've gone to kegs, I don't worry a lick.

If you REALLY want to be accurate, you'll need to figure out the sugar concentration/level of the honey. Of course, that's no guarantee that the sugar content is 100% fermenting sugars.

__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 05:55 AM   #4
diS
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
diS's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Croatia
Posts: 1,018
Liked 45 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

You can use it but major question is "why?".
If you want to give you beer taste of honey you can add it in primary.. although I brewed two batches with honey and I didn't noticed significant difference, at least not so significant to be worth of effort.. IMO

If you really want to prime with it add 20%-30% more honey than table sugar.
You can calculate actual percent by measuring OG of honey:

- dilute honey with water in ratio 1 oz : 1 cup
- measure OG with hydrometer
- calculate PPG-> PPG= (SG - 1) * 1000
- calculate how much is sugar ppg (46) higher than honey ppg, eg. if you get 38 ppg for honey, it is 1.21 times higher
- honey have approximately 95% fermentability, so count that up. For 38 ppg it would mean that you want 1.27 x more honey that you would add simple table sugar (46/38= 1.21 x 1.05= 1.27), note that 1.05 is from 95% (1/0,95).

__________________

We are only 10,000 years into beer... there are thousands of years left to go!
Things are bound to change!!

Brewroom with HERMS build
Fermentation chamber and Keezer.. a.k.a. FermKeezer

diS is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 12:17 PM   #5
TheCrackpot
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TheCrackpot's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Findlay, OH
Posts: 103
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I've boiled a pint of water for 5 minutes, dissolved a half cup of local wildflower honey in it (after the boil ended), and used it to prime 5.5 gallons before. It wasn't precise but it worked with no problems and no discernible flavor.

Why did I do it? I don't know.
I guess some people might be interested in it due to an aversion to or avoidance of corn products such as sugar.

I've used cane sugar (turbinado) about a dozen times and have noticed a cider flavor developing in about half of the beers over time.

Corn sugar does seem to be the easiest to control and get a consistent flavor.

__________________

Primary: Bohemian Pilsner, Simcoe Double Sunshine
Bottled: Galaxy Burst IPA, Pliny the Elder, Enjoy By Clone, Mosaic Double Sunshine, Double Sunshine, Holy Moley IPA, Abner, Mole Stout,
Heady Topper, HopSlam!, Grateful Dead Guy, Amarillo Ale,

TheCrackpot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 01:18 PM   #6
Calichusetts
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Calichusetts's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Plymouth, MA
Posts: 2,312
Liked 221 Times on 162 Posts
Likes Given: 592

Default

I only use honey and it is very reliable...never a bottle bomb or non-carbed beer in over 50 batches. In young beers you will get a tiny and subtle aroma and flavor, but in bigger beers or aged beers you will get nothing.

The typical 2-2.5 vol carb would be 2 tablespoons to 3 tablespoons. That is 1 oz to 1.5 ounces or 42-63 grams. I used to do 3 tablespoons (63 grams) but it was all little too carbed and had that bite. I use 2 tablespoons with a fantastic carbonation for my pales and IPAs all the time. Hope this helps

__________________
Calichusetts is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 03:29 PM   #7
Golddiggie
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 12,056
Liked 472 Times on 417 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calichusetts View Post
I only use honey and it is very reliable...never a bottle bomb or non-carbed beer in over 50 batches. In young beers you will get a tiny and subtle aroma and flavor, but in bigger beers or aged beers you will get nothing.

The typical 2-2.5 vol carb would be 2 tablespoons to 3 tablespoons. That is 1 oz to 1.5 ounces or 42-63 grams. I used to do 3 tablespoons (63 grams) but it was all little too carbed and had that bite. I use 2 tablespoons with a fantastic carbonation for my pales and IPAs all the time. Hope this helps
I have to ask, since you didn't post it, what batch SIZE are you bottling there? Can't be 5 gallons since the numbers (honey amount to CO2 volumes goal) don't add up.

As mentioned, if you let it go too long, the honey flavor will mellow/smooth out to something you really can't detect. Which means you don't add flavors that way (with some brews).

IF you really want to add honey flavor, use honey malt.

DON'T heat the honey above 100-110F. When you do, the more delicate flavors and aromas evaporate. The higher you heat, the more you lose (less delicate are lost at higher temperatures). You'll quickly reach a point where you're blowing off all you would have gained.

ALWAYS weigh honey when you're using it. Volume measurements are nigh on useless. With good, digital, scales being so damned cheap these days, there's no excuse (IMO) for not having one to use.

BTW, adding honey to primary typically has all the flavors hidden by what's in the wort. You need to add a LOT of honey there in order to get much of a gain. More than a few pounds in my experience (for a ~5 gallon batch). Mead tastes like it does due to being (for traditional recipes) 100% honey for flavor, aroma, fermenting sugars, etc.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 03:58 PM   #8
Calichusetts
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Calichusetts's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Plymouth, MA
Posts: 2,312
Liked 221 Times on 162 Posts
Likes Given: 592

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
I have to ask, since you didn't post it, what batch SIZE are you bottling there? Can't be 5 gallons since the numbers (honey amount to CO2 volumes goal) don't add up.

As mentioned, if you let it go too long, the honey flavor will mellow/smooth out to something you really can't detect. Which means you don't add flavors that way (with some brews).

IF you really want to add honey flavor, use honey malt.

DON'T heat the honey above 100-110F. When you do, the more delicate flavors and aromas evaporate. The higher you heat, the more you lose (less delicate are lost at higher temperatures). You'll quickly reach a point where you're blowing off all you would have gained.

ALWAYS weigh honey when you're using it. Volume measurements are nigh on useless. With good, digital, scales being so damned cheap these days, there's no excuse (IMO) for not having one to use.

BTW, adding honey to primary typically has all the flavors hidden by what's in the wort. You need to add a LOT of honey there in order to get much of a gain. More than a few pounds in my experience (for a ~5 gallon batch). Mead tastes like it does due to being (for traditional recipes) 100% honey for flavor, aroma, fermenting sugars, etc.
Oops...thanks...that is PER GALLON!

and yes, I just warm it up in some water, swirl then add to the bottling bucket.

Thanks
__________________
Calichusetts is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-07-2012, 06:30 PM   #9
sibs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: germantown, md
Posts: 23
Likes Given: 6

Default

ty for all the help

__________________
sibs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do you have to boil the bottel caps? maida7 Bottling/Kegging 5 12-10-2012 08:34 PM
Dark Honey or Light Honey for More Honey Flavor? NigeltheBold Recipes/Ingredients 17 11-01-2011 12:32 PM
Blue moon clone w/honey or summer ale w/honey?! Lind13 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 24 05-14-2011 11:06 PM
Adding honey malt to honey wheat beer? BK_BREWERY Recipes/Ingredients 5 10-03-2009 02:56 PM
Improvments to Amber Glow Apple cider wine bottel lable bfbf Label Display & Discussion 2 08-18-2009 08:59 PM