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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Home brew ale yeast or mold?

View Poll Results: What is this in the pictures?
Mold 2 22.22%
Ale Yeast 6 66.67%
Krausen 2 22.22%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 9. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-15-2013, 01:56 AM   #1
thewall47
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Default Home brew ale yeast or mold?

Hi all, this is a pretty basic question, I am doing my first brew and transferred into a, what I believed to be a clean secondary fermenter once my SG hit the target.

Both primary and secondary were cleaned with oxyclean then star san. The primary was in a plastic food grade bucket so I don't really know what fermentation of this beer looks like.

I know ales are top fermenting and this could just be a little foamy krausen. I have tried to read different forum post and some people say it's mold. Some replies just call the poster a moron for not knowing it's floating ale yeast, some say krausen, others, say leave the mold it makes the best beer ever!?

What's your thoughts?



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Old 10-15-2013, 01:58 AM   #2
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Pictures aren't working...but sight-unseen I'd bet even money that it's just Krausen and nothing more.

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Old 10-15-2013, 02:00 AM   #3
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Without seeing any pics, I'm guessing is just some yeast or yeast rafts. But if it's fuzzy - like obviously fuzzy - then it's mold.

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Old 10-15-2013, 02:18 AM   #4
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They were circular until I had to slide my fermenter out of the corner of my closet for pictures.

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Old 10-15-2013, 03:10 AM   #5
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Looks normal. When I secondary I get a ring of tiny bubbles like that around the top. It's yeast and co2 bubbles that haven't popped.

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Old 10-15-2013, 03:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAFSooner View Post
Looks normal. When I secondary I get a ring of tiny bubbles like that around the top. It's yeast and co2 bubbles that haven't popped.
Awesome! I just got a little nervous, since I didn't see what the original yeast/CO2 looked like during initial fermentation with the white food grade bucket!

How long would you leave this wheat beer in the secondary fermenter?
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:31 AM   #7
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I usually secondary for two weeks to clear the beer out. If it's a wheat it ain't gonna clear much. Only time I go longer than two weeks is for Belgians or IPAs with an extended dry hop schedule.

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Old 10-15-2013, 01:29 PM   #8
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Yeah, to me, it looks look like off-gassing surface break locations. What I envision is the (remaining) yeast settling down to the bottom of the carboy with a higher abundance in the lowest points along the bottom - the channel that forms a ring around the bottom about an inch or so from the sides of the carboy. From there, nucleation points help some co2 escape and it floats to the surface. The nucleation points tend to be consistent (maybe a piece of hop material or such) so the locations on the surface remain consistent, and the bubbles congregate on the surface in small "islands", in a ring about an inch from the walls of the carboy.

When you have a full yeastcake, it's so thick with so many possible nucleation points, the "islands" are basically randomly spread across the whole surface.

At least that's my explanation for it

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Old 10-15-2013, 03:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpug View Post
Yeah, to me, it looks look like off-gassing surface break locations. What I envision is the (remaining) yeast settling down to the bottom of the carboy with a higher abundance in the lowest points along the bottom - the channel that forms a ring around the bottom about an inch or so from the sides of the carboy. From there, nucleation points help some co2 escape and it floats to the surface. The nucleation points tend to be consistent (maybe a piece of hop material or such) so the locations on the surface remain consistent, and the bubbles congregate on the surface in small "islands", in a ring about an inch from the walls of the carboy.

When you have a full yeastcake, it's so thick with so many possible nucleation points, the "islands" are basically randomly spread across the whole surface.

At least that's my explanation for it
Here is day 2 of it. There are now more 'nucleation points'?


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Old 10-15-2013, 03:50 PM   #10
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In the lower picture, to me, the "islands" look like conglomerations of tiny bubbles (i.e. foam), which I would contribute to off-gassing, and nothing to worry about. Plus, they've formed in a ring on the surface which corresponds with the trough ring on the bottom of the fermenter.

Mold, on the other hand, would form where the spores land on the surface and begin propagating (i.e. random locations).

At least, this has been my experience.

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