New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > High Altitude Changes




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-06-2007, 08:18 PM   #1
PastorJasonHarris
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Scottsbluff, NE
Posts: 10
Default High Altitude Changes

I was just reading a posted recipe that called for about 7 gallons of water to be boiled for 90 minutes, yielding 5.5 gallons. That had me thinking, "duh, boiling water does evaporate."

Then I thought, "I am at a high elevation (about 5000 feet). Water boils faster and at a considerably lower temp (in the 190s)."

So I thought I would ask...In general, how should you alter beer recipes for high altitudes?



__________________

'Men can go wrong with wine and women. Shall we prohibit
and abolish women? The sun, moon and the stars have been
worshipped; shall we pluck them from the sky? See how much
He has done thru me even though I just prayed and preach,
the Word did it all...while I sat still and drank
beer with Philip, God dealt the papacy a
mighty blow'.

--Martin Luther
PastorJasonHarris is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2007, 09:56 PM   #2
RichBrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RichBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 5,713
Liked 70 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

I've never adjusted my brews for altitude. For some reason I don't get as MUCH boil off as I think I will. I'm pretty sure it has something to do with the flame setting on my cooker.
I have never heard of recipes being adjusted for altitude either. The best thing I can suggest is to go with a recipe as is and take notes on your volumes after the boil. Then adjust your boil times as needed.



__________________

Cheers,
Rich

RichBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2007, 10:07 PM   #3
Hercules Rockefeller
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Hercules Rockefeller's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Aurora CO
Posts: 238
Default

I've also never adjusted my recipes for altitude. The way I figure it, boil off rate should be a function of humity, not altitude. the altitude certainly would make water evaporate faster at a given temperature, but the boiling temperature is lower also. if you could actually get it up to 212 degrees, then the boil off should be higher. but I'm no expert in physics, that is just my educated guess. if anyone here has more specific knowledge, feel free to correct me/ smack me around / call me dirty names, etc

__________________

"let me be the first to welcome our new insectile overlords"

On deck: Breakfast stout
Primary: Empty
Secondary: American Pale Ale
Conditioning: None
Kegged: Imperial red ale, Breakfast stout, Chipotle Irish red ale, Biermuncher's C3C cream ale

Hercules Rockefeller is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2007, 11:50 PM   #4
malkore
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
malkore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 6,922
Liked 32 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

beer recipes don't have to be altered like, say, a recipe for bread or cake for the sake of altitude. you're just 'lucky' that things boil more readily at a higher elevation.

__________________
Malkore
Primary: English Mild
On tap: Pale Ale, Lancelot's Wheat, English Brown Ale, Steam Beer, HoovNuts IPA
Bottled: MOAM, Braggot, Raspberry Melomel, Merlot, Apfelwein, Pyment, Sweet mead, Cabernet
Gal in 2009: 27, Gal in 2010: 34, Gal in 2011: 13, Gal in 2012: 10
malkore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2007, 11:58 PM   #5
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,878
Liked 581 Times on 361 Posts
Likes Given: 52

Default

I live at 4,000' MSL, and I never adjust a thing when it comes to beer.

Bread's a completely different story.

__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-07-2007, 12:12 AM   #6
SoCalBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
SoCalBrewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Bay, California (Not the Bay Area)
Posts: 116
Default

I used to live in Big Bear, at around 7000ft. I brewed my beers exactly the same as the recipe called for, and all of mine turned out fine. Just like Malkore said, your baking a cake, so I dont think altitude is really relavent.

__________________

On Deck- NorTor Black, 10 gallon batch of Agent Orange

Primary 1-Long Beach Berry Wine
Primary 2-Empty
Secondary 1-Empty
Secondary 2-Empty
Secondary 3-Empty
Secondary 4-Empty

Keg 1-Imperial Stout
Keg 2-Edworts Apfelwein

Past Beers-Agent Orange (A keeper); Hefeweizen (You wont be missed), Agent Orange II

SoCalBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-07-2007, 05:25 PM   #7
IowaStateFan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Western slope of Pikes Peak
Posts: 230
Liked 7 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

The lower boiling temps have a significant affect on hops utilization. I found a formula online that can be used to calculate the effects of boil temp on utilization. I'm at work right now so I'm not sure where I got it, but I'll look when I get home. Anyway, I live at 9,100' and according to the formula my utilization is about 25% less.

Before I found the formula, I didn't adjust the recipes except for doing late addition of my extract. The lower gravity boosted the utilization over what the recipe was expecting so they balanced each other. I did do one kit from AHS and followed the directions exactly (ie. partial boil of all extract rather than late addition of 1/2, no changes to the hopping schedule) and it came out sickly sweet. It was a low IBU Munich Helles, so the difference was very pronounced.

As for evaporation, you will get more evaporation at altitude, mostly because the relative humidity is so low. If I get too much evaporation from my boil, I just top of the fermenter to get the volume I want.

__________________
IowaStateFan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-08-2007, 02:05 AM   #8
feedthebear
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Utah
Posts: 697
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I'm at 5500 ft. I don't adjust mine either.

__________________
Planning: Agave Witbock, Raisin Beer
Primary: GF Hazelnut Stout
Tertiary: Cranberry-Pom pLambic (est. bottle date: 03/01/08)
Drinking: Cab.Sav/Merlot Wine, Grand Cru, Hazelnut Stout #3, Ordinary Bitter
feedthebear is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-08-2007, 02:11 AM   #9
RichBrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RichBrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 5,713
Liked 70 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

Here's a question that has always bugged me.
Can you get water temperature to go above the point at which it boils? My opinion is that you can not unless you use a pressure cooker or something. I believe that what happens is that the more heat you add the faster the water boils off without going above the set boil temp. If you added 10000 degree heat to water it would just flash off as steam.

So what is the truth?

EDIT: The above paragraph was composed with opinion and conjecture. No facts or research were wasted in it's construction.

__________________

Cheers,
Rich

RichBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-08-2007, 03:00 AM   #10
SoCalBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
SoCalBrewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South Bay, California (Not the Bay Area)
Posts: 116
Default

The truth is Yes you can bring water above boil temperatures if there is enough pressure. They discovered fissures at the bottom of the ocean that have water around 800 degrees.



__________________

On Deck- NorTor Black, 10 gallon batch of Agent Orange

Primary 1-Long Beach Berry Wine
Primary 2-Empty
Secondary 1-Empty
Secondary 2-Empty
Secondary 3-Empty
Secondary 4-Empty

Keg 1-Imperial Stout
Keg 2-Edworts Apfelwein

Past Beers-Agent Orange (A keeper); Hefeweizen (You wont be missed), Agent Orange II

SoCalBrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High Altitude Brewing AirRageous Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 07-31-2013 09:45 PM
High altitude brewing? Musketear General Techniques 30 01-08-2013 02:34 AM
High Altitude Brewing? kinkothecarp Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 07-03-2009 03:53 AM
Yeast and High Altitude Brewing. Matrix4b Mead Forum 3 11-19-2008 05:14 AM
High altitude carbonation? casebrew General Beer Discussion 8 03-01-2007 12:33 AM