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Old 01-16-2013, 02:15 AM   #1
jchap86
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Default Help!

Ive just done my first home brew using
2 x 1.7kg can Original Series Stout*
1.5kg Thomas Coopers Dark Malt Extract
500g Dextrose, about 200g honey
7g Coopers yeast
Made up to 21 litres.. i have just checked on it after about 24 hours and the mix has bubbled out of the airlock.. i have also just taken a hydrometer reading and its off the scale! Guessing around 1.060 if it went up to that! Current temp of brew is 24 degrees celcius... Please help! Tried to attach pic but app keeps crashing

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Old 01-16-2013, 02:43 AM   #2
Ogri
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Do a search for both "blow off tube" and "swamp cooler".

The swamp cooler should be relatively easy to throw together and will get your fermenter's temps down lower than they are right now. Probably best to aim for about 18 deg C, or even a few below that. The Blow off tube will probably become even more necessary over the next day or so.

Judging by the quantities of fermentables you've used I'd say your OG is a good bit higher than the 60s, that 7g packet of cooper's yeast is way underpitching and won't be enough to chomp through all those sugars so there's a good chance you'll end up with a high gravity, stalled fermentation and really sweet beer.

Swamp cooler, blow off tube, more yeast, re-hydrate it if it's dry yeast and you might also want to do a bit of a search for hop tea additions, so you can add some more flavour, aroma and maybe even a little more bittering (although two cans of stout will probably give the brew a reasonable amount of bittering).

Best of luck and don't hesitate to ask more questions if need be.

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Old 01-16-2013, 03:01 AM   #3
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BTW,

adding those ingredients into beercalculus gives an OG of 1.085 and anticipated FG of 1.021:

Malt & Fermentables

% KG EBC Yield
61% 3.400 Coopers Stout Kit Late Boil 73 %
27% 1.500 Coopers Dark Malt Extract DME Late Boil 97 %
9% 0.500 Corn Sugar (Dextrose) Boil 100 %
4% 0.200 Honey Boil 75 %


Specific Gravity
1.085 OG
(1.076 to 1.088)
20.4° Plato
1.021 FG
(1.019 to 1.023)
5.3° Plato
Color
185° EBC
94° SRM
Black

Hops

Use Time Grams Hop Variety AA » IBU

Select an ingredient

Add
Bitterness
0 IBU
ƒ: Tinseth
0 HBU
BU:GU
0

Yeast


Cooper's Ale Dry Yeast
yeast in form with medium flocculation and 73% attenuation


Alcohol
8.3% ABV
6% ABW
Calories
281
per 12 oz.
Miscellaneous Ingredients

Not really sure of the best way to calculate the hop bitterness you'll get from the kit cans when using beercalculus. On another recipe calculator I've used you enter 1 Oz/28g of the hops used in at 5 minutes, per 1.7 kg can of extract. I think Cooper's are known for using Pride of Ringwood as their bittering hop in the extract kit cans.

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Old 01-16-2013, 07:58 AM   #4
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Legend! Cheers for the advice mate, appreciate it.

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Old 01-16-2013, 08:19 AM   #5
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Looks like it is going to be an awesome beer. Yeast are having a good time. It happens to me sometimes when brewing stouts. I would just set up a blow off tube as Ogri has suggested, clean up, wait 2-3 weeks then rack to bottle or keg.

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Old 01-16-2013, 01:47 PM   #6
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With 3 cans of LME,I'd have used 3-4 of the 7g yeast packets rehydrated for that batch.
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Old 01-18-2013, 05:10 AM   #7
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Fingers crossed it'll work out, I've read few different things about yeast and have thrown in 14 grams in total but suppose part of the experience is trial and error! Hydrometer reading is now 1.040 and its been happily bubbling away after adding blow off tube. I have also moved it to a cooler area and temp is now closer to 19 degrees.. cheers for the feedback and advice everyone. So far tastes a little sweet, will this change a lot by the 6 week mark? Thinking about starting another brew.. any recomendations on IPA? Want to make a batch without cheating with the LME this time, sooner I get my head around all this the better!

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Old 01-18-2013, 07:03 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchap86 View Post
Fingers crossed it'll work out, I've read few different things about yeast and have thrown in 14 grams in total but suppose part of the experience is trial and error! Hydrometer reading is now 1.040 and its been happily bubbling away after adding blow off tube. I have also moved it to a cooler area and temp is now closer to 19 degrees.. cheers for the feedback and advice everyone. So far tastes a little sweet, will this change a lot by the 6 week mark? Thinking about starting another brew.. any recomendations on IPA? Want to make a batch without cheating with the LME this time, sooner I get my head around all this the better!
I entered the estimated OG from above into the yeast calculator at Mrmalty.com and it says 17g dry yeast is the optimum amount, so you are only a little bit under. It might just add some more interesting esters from the yeast being a little stressed or fermentation might stall a bit early leaving you with a sweeter beer because the yeast can't muster the strength to chomp through the remaining sugars. Just have to wait and see.

Sounds like you've got fermentation temps down to a more reasonable level. Once the initial vigorous phase winds down it might be a good idea to put your fermenter somewhere warmer again. This will help the yeast stay active so that hopefully you'll get close to the required FG (that was 1.021 according to beercalculus) plus the yeast will do a clean up of some of the less desirable fermentation by-products. Leaving the brew in the primary fermenter for at least 3 weeks from pitching yeast will yield a beer that should taste different from how it does now as you're not even a week in yet, are you? Priming, carbonating and conditioning will see some slight changes in flavour also. Deent levels of carbonation will probably add a sort of bite that will slightly offset some of the sweetness.

Have a look here, there're loads of recipes for IPAs. Might be one that particularly takes your fancy.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:38 AM   #9
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Thanks mate, I've bookmarked all the sites you have mentioned.. It'll be 1 week on Tuesday, was just a little worried if the sweetness is an indicator of the end product... how long have you been brewing for? Sounds like you have it all down pat! In saying about leaving it in primary fermenter for at least 3 weeks, what are the benefits if Im going to bottle and the FG stays the same for at least a day or 2 before bottling and leaving for at least another 3 weeks? Ive heard theres not too much point although not sure how good the source was

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Old 01-20-2013, 12:33 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jchap86 View Post
Thanks mate, I've bookmarked all the sites you have mentioned.. It'll be 1 week on Tuesday, was just a little worried if the sweetness is an indicator of the end product... how long have you been brewing for? Sounds like you have it all down pat! In saying about leaving it in primary fermenter for at least 3 weeks, what are the benefits if Im going to bottle and the FG stays the same for at least a day or 2 before bottling and leaving for at least another 3 weeks? Ive heard theres not too much point although not sure how good the source was
Did my first brew in September 2011. Didn't think it turned out too bad, at the time, but the last bottle, drunk at nearly exactly a year later, confirmed that it wasn't all that. main thing I learned from that brew was the importance of keeping fermentation temps controlled as best you can during the first few days. Probably about 35 to 40 Brews under my belt since then and still a relative beginner but turning out some beers that I'm really pleased with
My first All Grain, BIAB, brewed back in December, I set out to make something close to an old speckled/crafty hen. Drinking it right now. Fell a bit short of my goal but as far as flavour goes it's practically an exact clone of a Belhaven Twisted thistle IPA, (did a side by side taste test today) except that it has an ABV of about 6.9%.


With regards the three weeks from pitching yeast. Basically the initial fermentation phase (attenuation) is very often finished within a week and, technically, you could bottle there and then. BUT, if you give the yeast another few days, at a temperature that helps them stay active, they clean up the majority of off flavours and aromas (conditioning phase)caused by compounds that are by-products of the fermentation process and/or conditions that stressed the yeast. Giving it another bit longer will give the yeast time to settle/flocculate out and compact into a more solid trub in the bottom of the fermenter which helps you get a nice, clearer, beer going into the bottles.

After bottling, three weeks conditioning at about 20*C should see an average gravity beer attain a decent amount of carbonation and start to mature to the point where it is ready to drink. Depending on the type of beer it could be drunk after chilling in the fridge for another couple of days or so. Wheat beers, really hoppy IPAs and some other lighter gravity or low ABV beers come into that category. Higher ABV beers, porters, stouts can definitely mellow and become way better after a few months, or longer in some cases, of conditioning.

Essentially, the more patience you have, when it comes to popping the cap off a bottle and drinking the contents the bigger the rewards but, let's face it, waiting for your first few brews to achieve perfection isn't an easy task I'd say that, by all means, throw a bottle into the fridge for a couple of days after a week of conditioning and give it a try, one at two weeks, one at three weeks etc, etc and see for yourself. Definitely try to go for three weeks of primary fermentation before bottling for your first couple of batches, though, as I'm reasonably sure it's a worthwhile strategy. After that, try some shorter primary fermentation schedules and see if the beer is up to par for you.
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