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Old 07-20-2009, 02:29 AM   #1
coolkid102938
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Ok. so I started brewing about two months ago. My first batch, a blonde ale, came out wonderful and was gone in two days after 4 weeks of bottle conditioning. my Second batch an american light ale came out extremely cloudy. i let it bottle condition at 63 degrees for two weeks and just moved it to the cold room at my liquor store for three weeks. after refregerating i notice that a about a millimeter worth of **** drops uot on top of the yeast cake. It tastes allright but is still cloudy as hell. Now my third batch i just bottled ten minutes ago. this one was a german style light ale. fermentration got pff and running quickly but when i bottled it i noticed that there was barely any yeast cake. not nerarly as much as my previous two batched and it is also pretty damn cloudy in the bottles. All three batches fermented at 63 degrees in a wine cellar for 16 days. THe only difference that i can think of is the first batch i did a two and a half gallon boil while the other two i did about a four to four and a half gallon boil. they all came to a boil but the second two batches didnt come to as strong of one because ther was more liquid. Oh yeah and the blonde ale contained steeping grains. What am i doing wrong with these second two batches. I know i should probably RDWHAHB but i drank my blonde ale with my friends in two days and all i have is natty light.

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Old 07-20-2009, 02:37 AM   #2
JLem
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what yeast did you use? Some are more flocculant than others so will settle out more quickly.

Did you use any clarifiers (e.g. irish moss or whirfloc)?

How quickly did you cool the wort before pitching the yeast? If you didn't get it cooled fast enough you might not have a had a good cold break


Last edited by JLem; 07-20-2009 at 02:39 AM.
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Old 07-20-2009, 01:37 PM   #3
BruDaddy
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With the larger boils it will be harder to cool and could result in a lack of good cold break. But this won't impact the flavor at all - it's just cloudy. Learn to love the cloudy beer or get some porcelain beer mugs. If you just have to have really clear beer, look into better cooling methods, setting your boiling pot in a tub or sink full of ice will help. Also, look into investing in a wort chiller. IMO quick cooling is probably a good idea even beyond getting a cold break as the sooner you get your wort into the fermenter the better.

In general for clarity, you can help some by letting it sit in the fermenter longer - I almost never touch my beer before at least 2 weeks in the primary. You can consider getting a 5 gal carboy and doing a secondary, this would allow you to let it condition even longer before bottling (but this touches on serious beer theology issues that I don't want to address here ). Also, if you have a fridge you can cold crash which sort of gives you cold break after the fact and provides for a clearer beer.

But mostly RDWHAHB

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