Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Heat produced as a by product of fermentation?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-07-2009, 12:53 PM   #1
IanIanBoBian
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 55
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default Heat produced as a by product of fermentation?

I made my first 5 gallon batch last night with my new brewer's best kit. I did everything the directions said and cooled to wort to 70 degrees, added luke warm water to the 5 gallon mark and pitched the yeast. I put it in the upstars closet and stuck my liquid crystal themometer on the side of the fermentor (plastic bucket). I went back to check the temperature a little bit later and it was at 80 degrees! I was worried and confused since my house isn't that warm, so I put my empty carboy in there too with the liquid crystal thermometer and the closet is at like 68 degrees. The airlock was bubbling away this morning after only like 8 hours in the fermentor, so i'm assuming it's fine. The temperature has dropped to the mid 70s. So is heat produced as a by product of fermentation or did I screw something up? Should I be going for 68 degrees in the fermentor or 68 degrees for the room it is in? Thanks!

__________________
IanIanBoBian is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 12:58 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,384
Liked 4284 Times on 3121 Posts
Likes Given: 830

Default

Fermentation is definitely exothermic- I've heard of increases as high as 10 degrees in actively fermenting wort.

You want the wort temperature to be 65-68 degrees, regardless of room temperature, if that's the temperature you're shooting for. Higher may cause some esters (fruitiness) and/or some fusels (harsh alcohol flavors).

I like to ferment my ales at the cool side of the yeast strain's recommended temperature, so sometimes my room is at 60-62 degrees.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 01:00 PM   #3
The Pol
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 11,616
Liked 51 Times on 48 Posts

Default

Heat is produced, and the more vigorous the ferment, the more heat you can get. This is why many people end up acquiring a fermentation chamber where they can control the temp. I set mine at about 66-67F for the primary ferment.

You did good, the yeast are messing with ya!

__________________
The Pol is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 01:02 PM   #4
JesseRC
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 1,784
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

My first stout went up 8 degrees using S-04. You should shoot for 68 in the fermenter or less. Most brewers say they get about 4 degrees rise from the room temperature. Once fermentation is over or slows you'll notice it starts to normalize more with room temperature. Next time you'll want aticipate for the rise ahead of time. Some folks make swamp cooler using t-shirts and a basin of water and ice bottles if necessary to maintain a good temperature.

__________________

Jesse

Primaries: Mojave Red (AG)
Kegs: Hibiscus Saison (AG), Orange Kolsch (AG) , Cocunut Porter
Future Brew: Wee Heavy

JesseRC is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 01:10 PM   #5
IanIanBoBian
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 55
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Looks like I'll have to put the fermentor in the basement next time. Maybe even with this one when I get home, depending on the temperature. I didn't realize the temperature would rise that much from room temperature.

__________________
IanIanBoBian is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 01:46 PM   #6
golfnmotorcycles
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Caruthersville, MO
Posts: 73
Default

I'm 2 batches in, and this has happened both times. I keep my house cold enough in the winter that I wasn't otherwise worried about fermenting at too warm a temp. Until I saw the post-pitching spike.

The first time I used a tote I already had, added water, and went the swamp cooler route. A little water and a few ice packets chilled it very quickly. A few nights later it got so cool I actually had to add warm water to keep it from getting too low and slowing/stopping activity.

The second time, with a full secondary already in the closet and the tote removed, I simply put the fermenter in the bathtub, filled the tub with cold water, and left it for a few a few hours. Once it broke 75 I put it in the closet and it's been fine (and fermenting like crazy) for three days now.

__________________
golfnmotorcycles is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 01:51 PM   #7
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,384
Liked 4284 Times on 3121 Posts
Likes Given: 830

Default

Another thing to consider is the pitching temperature. If it was 70 when you pitched (I'm not sure of your temperature when you added the yeast), and fermentation started right away, it'd never cool down to room temperature. I like to pitch my yeast at my desired fermentation temperature, maybe even a little bit cooler. So, I'd probably pitch my yeast at 62-64 degrees.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 02:02 PM   #8
pjj2ba
Look under the recliner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
pjj2ba's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: State College, Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,427
Liked 192 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Another thing to keep in mind is air circulation. If you put the carboy in a closed closet, much of the heat generated will stay in the closet and your ferment temp will go up. Put that same carboy in an open room with good air circulation and much of the heat will be quickly disapated and the temp in the carboy won't go up very much.

The lagers I have going in the basement are holding at 50 F with an air temp of 50 F. I've just got them out in the open in trays with a couple inches of water. Water is a good heat conductor so it helps to remove heat (and stabilize temp.). No fans, no wet T-shirts. Of course these are lagers and they don't generate as much heat. If I'm doing ales in the summer and the basement is too warm, I'll add the T-shirt and a fan to give me at least 4F below air temp.

__________________
On Tap: Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), CZ Pils, Maibock,
Kegged and Aging/Lagering:CAP, CAP II, Wheat lager, Imperial Pilsner, Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), OKZ II (for base malt comparison), light beer - yes, light beer, Belgian IPA, IPA,
Secondary:
Primary: Pale Ale
Brewing soon: Saison
Recently kicked : ( IPA, Bock, Saison,
Pilsner Urquell Master Homebrewer
(1st NYC 2011, 2nd NYC 2012)
P U crowns winners in its inaugural master HB competition
pjj2ba is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2009, 03:15 PM   #9
IanIanBoBian
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 55
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Well thanks for all the great replies. I'll check the temp when I get home and adjust accordingly. I'm not sure what the temperature was when I pitched the yeast, which was another mistake. I cooled the wort to 70 and then just added what felt like room temp water and pitched the yeast. I'll definitely make sure the wort is a little cooler before pitching the yeast. I'll probably put it in the basement too, or at the very least not in a closet. I put it in there because it is obviously dark all the time. So what are the odds that I'll have some off flavors due to the higher temperatures?

__________________

Last edited by IanIanBoBian; 01-08-2009 at 04:02 AM.
IanIanBoBian is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heat of Fermentation Netflyer Brew Science 26 11-22-2009 04:08 AM
fermentation heat wbgv Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 11-29-2008 02:12 PM
Fermentation causes HEAT??? Ironhead Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 02-01-2008 09:55 PM
Number of bottles produced--is this off? jpb3 Bottling/Kegging 8 10-05-2007 07:13 PM
Alcohol produced while bottle conditioning? WhatsOnTap Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 02-01-2006 05:23 PM