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-   -   Good hoppy pilsner? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/good-hoppy-pilsner-409023/)

catfishunter 05-04-2013 05:21 AM

Good hoppy pilsner?
 
Hey what's up! I'm looking for a good recipe for a hoppier style pilsner, maybe similar to a prima pils. Anyone know a good recipe? I'm fairly new at brewing, this would be my 7th batch. I've been doing extracts and partials only, but I want to make the jump to all grain in the near future. Anyway, any help would be great! Thanks.

unionrdr 05-04-2013 05:42 PM

Pilsners are as a rule,not very hoppy,but well balanced. There are some breweries that are doing IPL's though. Idia Pale Lagers. Seems to be the latest craze.

kontrol 05-04-2013 06:03 PM

Here we have a dry hopped pils and its fantastic. Dont stick the rules too much. Personally id follow a standard recipe and dry hop with 1oz of saaz to get a wondeful floral aroma.

freisste 05-04-2013 06:19 PM

Just want to point out that pilsners are lagers. If you know that, ignore this post. If not, keep in mind that lagers require better fermentation temperature control.

What is it that you like about pilsners? Maybe the community can point you in the direction of something that would work for you.

And I agree with the previous post. Screw the "rules." Brew what you like the way you like it.

unionrdr 05-04-2013 06:58 PM

Weeell...anymore,I like to stick to the basic style parameters,but add my own little tweaks to make it unique. But the IPL thing is def intriguing...

catfishunter 05-04-2013 08:35 PM

I like the crispness and drinkability of a pilsner. I love ipa's and pale ales but something about a good pilsner hits the spot. Wanted to make something other than an ale for once, although I did try to do a pilsner for my second brew attempt and like an idiot did not know it was a lager. I ended up dumping that batch. I'm just looking for something refreshing that isn't to strong and maybe a little more challenging to make.

freisste 05-05-2013 03:45 PM

If you can handle lagering, try unionrdr's approach and brew a lower gravity IPA with lager yeast (IPL, as he said).

There is a brewery near me that makes lagers exclusively, but they branch out to other styles, so they make ale-style beers with lager yeast. Their IPL is fantastic. I'll be trying to brew something similar pretty soon.

unionrdr 05-05-2013 03:55 PM

I used WL029 German ale/kolsh yeast in my hybrid lager recipes I'm working on. It's a hybrid of ale yeast & kolsh,being a lager type yeast. It gives a clean,lager like quality. But the part I like is that it's ideal ferment temp range is 65-69F. Works real well in this regard.
And it wasn't an IPL or India Pale Lager,just a light lager malt profile with the mentioned yeast. There are a couple breweries doing the new IPL's. I just haven't done it myself yet.

Yooper 05-05-2013 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by catfishunter (Post 5167792)
I like the crispness and drinkability of a pilsner. I love ipa's and pale ales but something about a good pilsner hits the spot. Wanted to make something other than an ale for once, although I did try to do a pilsner for my second brew attempt and like an idiot did not know it was a lager. I ended up dumping that batch. I'm just looking for something refreshing that isn't to strong and maybe a little more challenging to make.

Can you ferment at 50 degrees? If not, can you ferment at 60? Or 65?

What I would do is make a very simple pilsner (pick out a recipe from here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f58/) and then we can help you make it a pseudo-pilsner by picking the proper yeast strain for the temperature you can hold for fermentation.

For example, a lager yeast strain for 50 degrees. A hybrid strain for 58-62 degrees, or a clean well attenuating ale strain for 63-68 degrees. It might not be a crisp as a real lager, but we can help you pick out the best strain and technique based on the fermentation temperatures you can maintain.

Edit- how about this one? http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f58/sort...a-pils-150972/ If you're using extract, you can just sub 6 pounds of light or extra light extract for the two-row, adding half at the end of the boil and half at the beginning for a nice light color.

catfishunter 05-06-2013 04:08 AM

I'm pushing around 62 degrees in my basement, but I do have a small fridge I can fit a carboy in. I was thinking about attempting that. I'm probably going to try that prima pils recipe you posted Mr. Yooper, it looks good. Thanks for the help I really appreciate it!


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