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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > German style aroma hops in IPA???
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:50 PM   #1
Andy_LV
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Default German style aroma hops in IPA???

Hey all,
was wondering if I will screw up my IPA if I use German style aroma hops for dry-hopping, especially Hopsteiners Hallertauer and Hersbrucker. Kinda pain in the lower back to get hops from U.K. - have to order "a lot" and was wondering if ones I have will do...

thanks in advance.

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Old 10-12-2010, 10:54 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Andy_LV View Post
Hey all,
was wondering if I will screw up my IPA if I use German style aroma hops for dry-hopping, especially Hopsteiners Hallertauer and Hersbrucker. Kinda pain in the lower back to get hops from U.K. - have to order "a lot" and was wondering if ones I have will do...

thanks in advance.
I don't believe you would screw it up. The ipa characteristics come more from the bittering hops as opposed to the aroma ones.
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Old 10-12-2010, 10:56 PM   #3
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Thanks, I have planned to use them along with ones in the hopped malt extract can. Should be interesting brew anyway :-)

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Old 10-12-2010, 11:01 PM   #4
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I don't believe you would screw it up. The ipa characteristics come more from the bittering hops as opposed to the aroma ones.
While I don't think you would "screw it up", I don't agree that the IPA characteristics come from the bittering hops. On the contrary, the "hoppiness" comes from the aroma and flavor hops. English IPAs are less hoppy than American IPAs, but they are definitely hoppy!

14A. English IPA
Aroma: A moderate to moderately high hop aroma of floral, earthy or fruity nature is typical, although the intensity of hop character is usually lower than American versions. A slightly grassy dry-hop aroma is acceptable, but not required. A moderate caramel-like or toasty malt presence is common. Low to moderate fruitiness, either from esters or hops, can be present. Some versions may have a sulfury note, although this character is not mandatory.

Appearance: Color ranges from golden amber to light copper, but most are pale to medium amber with an orange-ish tint. Should be clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy. Good head stand with off-white color should persist.

Flavor: Hop flavor is medium to high, with a moderate to assertive hop bitterness. The hop flavor should be similar to the aroma (floral, earthy, fruity, and/or slightly grassy). Malt flavor should be medium-low to medium-high, but should be noticeable, pleasant, and support the hop aspect. The malt should show an English character and be somewhat bready, biscuit-like, toasty, toffee-like and/or caramelly. Despite the substantial hop character typical of these beers, sufficient malt flavor, body and complexity to support the hops will provide the best balance. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable, and fruitiness from the fermentation or hops adds to the overall complexity. Finish is medium to dry, and bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh. If high sulfate water is used, a distinctively minerally, dry finish, some sulfur flavor, and a lingering bitterness are usually present. Some clean alcohol flavor can be noted in stronger versions. Oak is inappropriate in this style.

Mouthfeel: Smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel without hop-derived astringency, although moderate to medium-high carbonation can combine to render an overall dry sensation in the presence of malt sweetness. Some smooth alcohol warming can and should be sensed in stronger (but not all) versions.

Overall Impression: A hoppy, moderately strong pale ale that features characteristics consistent with the use of English malt, hops and yeast. Has less hop character and a more pronounced malt flavor than American versions.

Comments: A pale ale brewed to an increased gravity and hop rate. Modern versions of English IPAs generally pale in comparison (pun intended) to their ancestors. The term “IPA” is loosely applied in commercial English beers today, and has been (incorrectly) used in beers below 4% ABV. Generally will have more finish hops and less fruitiness and/or caramel than English pale ales and bitters. Fresher versions will obviously have a more significant finishing hop character.

History: Brewed to survive the voyage from England to India. The temperature extremes and rolling of the seas resulted in a highly attenuated beer upon arrival. English pale ales were derived from India Pale Ales.

Ingredients: Pale ale malt (well-modified and suitable for single-temperature infusion mashing); English hops; English yeast that can give a fruity or sulfury/minerally profile. Refined sugar may be used in some versions. High sulfate and low carbonate water is essential to achieving a pleasant hop bitterness in authentic Burton versions, although not all examples will exhibit the strong sulfate character.
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Old 10-12-2010, 11:06 PM   #5
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hmm... sounds like there are too many ways to skin an IPA...

anyway, looks like I will end up with "Authentic Riga IPA"

oh, P.S. thanks for the story.

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Old 10-12-2010, 11:51 PM   #6
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I've tried an all-Haulertau IPA brewed by Stone.

I felt sorry for the grains that went into it.

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Old 10-13-2010, 12:08 AM   #7
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oh my, that bad?

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Old 10-13-2010, 01:31 AM   #8
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Considering all of the other fine Stone brews they could have become, yes.

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Old 10-13-2010, 02:31 AM   #9
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I had a beer at the Durham World Beer Festival this past weekend that was over-hopped with some noble hops (don't remember which) around the levels of an American IPA, and it was pretty awful. I don't know if my palate wasn't ready for it, but my feeling is that those hops are better in less forceful amounts.

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Old 10-13-2010, 01:02 PM   #10
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Hope German hops are ok - I've got a hoppy one just bottled!

What sort of IPA hopping levels are we talking? The continuous hopping type approach, or straightforward flavour and aroma additions?

Mine is a simple 1oz last 15, 1oz dry hopped with Hersbrucker and tasted pretty good being bottled, if bitter (high alpha Green Bullet bittering hops and an inaccurate set of scales...).

Maybe these German ones just don't let you get away with over the top additions?

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