Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > First Time brewing All Grain
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-11-2013, 04:44 PM   #1
ves1000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default First Time brewing All Grain

Hello Everyone, This is my 4th batch and 1st all grain brew. I usually get my receipe from HomeBrewParty, a local San Antonio store but I found this clone online and I don't understand some of the words. Can someone please decypher this?

Direct heated to Sacch II rest, decoted about a gallon and heated to a boil over 20 min, transferred the rest of the mash from the pot to the cooler, by the time the decoction was added back the main mash had lost enough heat to keep the temp near 160.

2.5 gallons of first runnings. Batch sparged. Collected 6.25 gallons of 1.033 wort.
Here is the recipe;
http://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/live...feweizen-clone

What temp and how long should I heat the grains?

Thanks!

__________________
ves1000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 05:34 PM   #2
BrutalBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: plainfield, IN
Posts: 344
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

I dont know the terms but the wiki on this forum might help you..

__________________

Foster's Isn't fermented in a kangaroo's pouch?

BrutalBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 06:12 PM   #3
Captain Damage
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Lowell, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,231
Liked 81 Times on 69 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

It refers to a 2-stage saccharification, involving a single decoction. Saccharification is the process of converting the starch in the grain to sugar. Decoction is when you start your mash at a lower temperature and draw off a portion of it, then bring the drawn-off (decocted) portion to a boil and add it back to the main mash. This raises the temperature of the mash as well as inducing some maillard (browning) reactions in the decocted portion.

__________________

Stop using so much caramel malt. Your beer will thank you.
(yes, Carapils is a caramel malt...so is Special B)

FERMENTING

BOTTLED
pujwI HIq Mild Ale
KPA Khitomer Pale Ale

Captain Damage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 06:17 PM   #4
BrutalBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: plainfield, IN
Posts: 344
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

They should rewrite there instructions , most people that will need instructions will NOT know the terms due to being new. If you do know the terms then you probably are NOT using instructions LMAO

__________________

Foster's Isn't fermented in a kangaroo's pouch?

BrutalBrew is offline
electrolight Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 06:21 PM   #5
Likefully
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Cape Town, Western Cape
Posts: 198
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

BrutalBrew has hit the nail on the head. Just slightly more descriptive recipes would make a world of difference to us newbs!

__________________
Likefully is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 06:44 PM   #6
ScottG58
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: West Des Moines, Iowa
Posts: 363
Liked 67 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Saccharization rest would normally be from 148 f for highly ferment able and thin beer to 156 for more residual sweetness. With decoction, you draw off a thick mash (I use a strainer) with just enough liquid to keep it from scorching. You want low heat and stirring almost constantly. If you have a step temperature you are trying to meet, don't just dump the decoction back in all at once. Do it in stages, checking the temp after stirring between additions to make sure you do not overshoot your target temperature.

I found decoction to be an advanced skill. I was glad that I had a few all grain batches done before I tried it. My first few all grain batches, I was trying to get my target temperature right and trying to figure out how to hold that temperature.

You may find a debate out there about whether decoction adds flavor that is worth the trouble. When you try your first one, if you are like me, you will feel like you are juggling containers of hot wort.

I have not tried to make a hefe. You may try this the first time as a single infusion mash with a batch sparge. Others who do hefes can suggest a rest temperature and time.

Please not that I am not trying to insult your potential. I just suggest that when trying something new, you simplify the process and try to limit the things that can go wrong. Also decoction takes a long time. You not only have the boil time of the mash, you also have the time of bringing the thick mash to a boil at low heat. You also have another pot to clean.

__________________
ScottG58 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2013, 09:35 PM   #7
stevehardt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: lakewood ranch, florida
Posts: 364
Liked 26 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

I have to agree with Scott....This seems like a fairly complicated recipe for a first all grain batch. Is there another recipe you like with more straightforward directions?

You can start simple and add more involved procedures after you get a few all grains under your belt.

__________________
stevehardt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2013, 12:37 PM   #8
ves1000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 3
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately I already bought the ingredients. The ingredients didn't cost a lot, so I'll give it a try and see how it turns out. It probably won't taste like its suppose to, but it will be beer. Haha.

__________________
ves1000 is offline
electrolight Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2013, 12:55 PM   #9
Gitmoe
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Norristown, PA
Posts: 556
Liked 99 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

Just skip the decoction. Do a single infusion mash with batch sparge

Target Mash Temp: 150

Sparge Temp: 160

Your Hef will be fine without a Sach rest or decoction. Traditional recipes for classic german styles usually will call for a decoction mash simply because that's the way most German beer was brewed. Historically German brewers were using "under converted" malts and a decoction mash would raise efficiency and help to get every last bit of sugar out of the grist. Today's modern malting processes produce "highly converted" malts and a decoction isn't important from a technical aspect. There's a long debate about whether a decoction mash drastically changes the flavor of a beer. It certainly will have an effect. For your first batch just do a single infusion mash. Then take some time to research the malting process to understand why a decoction was used historically. It's some interesting stuff...

__________________
Gitmoe is offline
Pappers_ Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2013, 01:00 PM   #10
Captain Damage
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Lowell, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,231
Liked 81 Times on 69 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Decoction mashing is a pretty advanced technique - enough so that most "advanced" home brewers have never done it, or have done it once and decided it's not worth the trouble. Then again, there are brewers who swear it's the only way to get "authentic" flavor in your beer.

While decoction is a traditional mash for German hefes (it's a way to build a protein rest into your mash, but that's another advanced topic), you can make a great beer by using a simple single-stage infusion mash, which I think we'd all recommned for your first all-grain brew. Just mash at 148F for 60-90 minutes. It won't be a clone beer, but will be tasty nonetheless.

BTW, the instructions for your recipe look incomplete in any case since there's no initial/saccharification temperature or mash time.

__________________

Stop using so much caramel malt. Your beer will thank you.
(yes, Carapils is a caramel malt...so is Special B)

FERMENTING

BOTTLED
pujwI HIq Mild Ale
KPA Khitomer Pale Ale

Captain Damage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
first time brewing a stout; concerned about fermenting time and final gravity rnbwdrgn Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 06-17-2011 10:46 PM
first time home brewing want to do all grain padawanbrewer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 04-17-2011 04:59 PM
Help with 1st time all-grain brewing dlbarncord All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 02-03-2011 12:53 AM
check out my all grain. first time brewing AG hubba All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 0 01-06-2011 01:51 AM
All grain apartment brewing on balcony! First time brewer steveo929 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 01-22-2010 11:17 PM