Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > First pour on day 10 post bottling, slightly sweet, and flat
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-01-2012, 11:46 PM   #1
NavyMarine1978
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 100
Likes Given: 15

Default First pour on day 10 post bottling, slightly sweet, and flat

I opened up my first Irish Stout Pub Draught on the 10th day after bottling. The bottle gave bit of a hiss when popping the top but found the first pour to be a bit flat. The beer tastes right and has alcohol but seemed to have a slight sweetness about it. It tastes like bitters that I have had in the past and very much like a cask beer. Since this is my first batch and first experience with this beer, I have nothing to compare to. I was also uncertain as to the sweetness being related to the hops that I used or the bottling sugar. Can bottling sugar be tasted if not totally used up by the remaining yeasts?

__________________
NavyMarine1978 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2012, 11:49 PM   #2
jmprdood
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: , Home is Spokane WA
Posts: 597
Liked 21 Times on 21 Posts

Default

Still young. Let it sit in the bottle for a couple more weeks at room temp to condition and carb. I'm just now drinking a stout I bottled on 1 Dec.

Cheers!

__________________
jmprdood is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2012, 11:49 PM   #3
Hang Glider
Beer Drinker
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Hang Glider's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Augusta, SC
Posts: 3,160
Liked 149 Times on 119 Posts
Likes Given: 102

Default

in two more weeks, come back and report. Leave them be until then.

Rule of thumb - at LEAST 3 weeks in the bottle for sufficient carbonation. Some even take longer.

Carbonation will take some of the sweetness out of it.

__________________
Hang Glider is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-01-2012, 11:51 PM   #4
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,805
Liked 2777 Times on 1661 Posts
Likes Given: 3489

Default

The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

If a beer isn't carbed by "x number of weeks" you just have to give them more time. If you added your sugar, then the beer will carb up eventually, it's really a foolroof process. All beers will carb up eventually. A lot of new brewers think they have to "troubleshoot" a bottling issue, when there really is none, the beer knows how to carb itself. In fact if you run beersmiths carbing calculator, some lower grav beers don't even require additional sugar to reach their minimum level of carbonation. Just time.

I've carbed hundreds of gallons of beer, and never had a beer that wasn't carbed, or under carbed or anything of the sort (Except for a batch where I accidently mixed up lactose or Maltodextrine for priming sugar). Some took awhile, (as I said up to six months) but they ALL eventually carbed.

I don't believe there are ANY carbing problems (besides the rare capper that maybe puts a bad seal on a bottle, or tired yeast in a HIGH gravity beer) that isn't simple impatience.

As I said in my bottling blog, it's really a fool proof process, you add sugar, keep the beer above 70 and wait.

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 12:03 AM   #5
Ericbme
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 149
Liked 34 Times on 29 Posts

Default

I hope this isn't a silly question...

Do you have to maintain the above 70* temp. I just bottled my first batch last week and they are in a room which hangs around 60-65*. Will the lower temp just add conditioning time?

__________________
Ericbme is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 12:12 AM   #6
OHIOSTEVE
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: SIDNEY, ohio
Posts: 3,518
Liked 66 Times on 59 Posts
Likes Given: 45

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ericbme View Post
I hope this isn't a silly question...

Do you have to maintain the above 70* temp. I just bottled my first batch last week and they are in a room which hangs around 60-65*. Will the lower temp just add conditioning time?
I cannot give a definitive answer but I think that if you are within the working range of the yeast they will carb up. I mean after all we let em set at a certain temp to ferment why do we think we have to raise the temp to get em to ferment in the bottle? I think however it may take longer.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikethepoolguy View Post
I started brewing 69 days ago, 35 gal so far. SWMBO hasnt complained yet! Better than the hookers, gambling, and crack I used to do, I guess.
BALDGUT BREWS
OHIOSTEVE is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 07:03 PM   #7
NavyMarine1978
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 100
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmprdood View Post
Still young. Let it sit in the bottle for a couple more weeks at room temp to condition and carb. I'm just now drinking a stout I bottled on 1 Dec.

Cheers!
So that was about 31-32 days? How was the carbination? My father makes Coopers and won't touch them until bottled for 5 weeks. He even says 4.5 is not long enough. Is this a good rule of thumb?
__________________
NavyMarine1978 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 07:07 PM   #8
NavyMarine1978
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 100
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hang Glider View Post
in two more weeks, come back and report. Leave them be until then.

Rule of thumb - at LEAST 3 weeks in the bottle for sufficient carbonation. Some even take longer.

Carbonation will take some of the sweetness out of it.
I will most certainly do that. I simply wanted to try one to see what state it was in and make sure they tasted like beer. I was glad that they taste good and they have alcohol, they only lack carbonation and are slightly sweet. So, near the end of this month should make a noticable difference?
__________________
NavyMarine1978 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 07:23 PM   #9
NavyMarine1978
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia
Posts: 100
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

If a beer isn't carbed by "x number of weeks" you just have to give them more time. If you added your sugar, then the beer will carb up eventually, it's really a foolroof process. All beers will carb up eventually. A lot of new brewers think they have to "troubleshoot" a bottling issue, when there really is none, the beer knows how to carb itself. In fact if you run beersmiths carbing calculator, some lower grav beers don't even require additional sugar to reach their minimum level of carbonation. Just time.

I've carbed hundreds of gallons of beer, and never had a beer that wasn't carbed, or under carbed or anything of the sort (Except for a batch where I accidently mixed up lactose or Maltodextrine for priming sugar). Some took awhile, (as I said up to six months) but they ALL eventually carbed.

I don't believe there are ANY carbing problems (besides the rare capper that maybe puts a bad seal on a bottle, or tired yeast in a HIGH gravity beer) that isn't simple impatience.

As I said in my bottling blog, it's really a fool proof process, you add sugar, keep the beer above 70 and wait.
This is my first batch of home brew and wanted to taste it to see where it was at. It tastes great, like a bitter with the mouth feel of a cask beer, very smooth and slightly sweet. The beer is only at the 11 day mark today since bottling. My father brews Coopers and won't touch it for 5 weeks after bottling. He says that even 4.5 weeks isn't long enough. Is this a good rule of thumb?
__________________
NavyMarine1978 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-02-2012, 11:25 PM   #10
Hang Glider
Beer Drinker
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Hang Glider's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Augusta, SC
Posts: 3,160
Liked 149 Times on 119 Posts
Likes Given: 102

Default

Welcome to your new hobby...
We all understand the desire to taste - we all had our "first batch" - we're a bunch of homebrewers that have found what works (for us) and when you read a bunch of different opinions, then take your pick - but when you begin to see consensus, then it's probably a good idea to consider that valuable information as you move forward.

so, welcome, welcome! To work on your patience, many of us will recommend getting another bucket/carboy (fermenter) and starting your next batch! Build up a pipeline of tasty home brew, learning along the way.

as stated above, time is style-dependent. 3 weeks is a good minimum, like for an IPA or a wheat, while you may want your stouts and porters to mature a bit. Heck the other day I cracked open my last coffee porter, )made a year ago) and it was incredible!

__________________
Hang Glider is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beer tastes sweet and flat 06gixxer600 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 28 01-19-2012 05:40 PM
When bottling, it seemed slightly carbonated... normal? bwatts4200 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 11-18-2011 08:14 PM
Bottling Runoff Sweet B33rL0v3r Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 08-18-2011 05:34 AM
Russian Imperial Stout SWEET at bottling... beersteiner2345 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 08-16-2011 03:26 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS