Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > First Brew; Not getting warm fuzzies...

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-25-2012, 05:44 AM   #1
beer_stan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Default First Brew; Not getting warm fuzzies...

Hello all!

I have read through many of the sticky posts, and have yet to find a good answer to my questions. I followed John Palmer's How To Brew to brew a Cincinatti IPA from extract.

The instructions were.. less than stellar.. I think I made the following mistakes:

  • The temperature of the wort boil changed (the book didn't mention any specific boil temperature, just to 'boil it'). It went from a light boil to a heavy boil a few times.
  • I didn't sterilize the entire fermenting bucket. Again, the instructions said to fill it with 5 gallons of sterilized water. I have a 6 gallon bucket, so there was some headroom that was not sterilized.
  • The book said to boil water, and then use it to mix the yeast. The water was still steaming slightly (but about 5 minutes off a boil) when I mixed in the yeast.

It has been >72 hours, and so far as I can tell nothing is happening.

Questions:
  • Should I re-pitch the yeast?
  • Is there a better resource than 'How to brew' that is for new brewers that will point out the problem areas (ie, sterilize the entire container.. dont use hot water for the yeast).
  • Does the boil temperature matter? Or just that it is boiling.. fast..slow.. or anywhere inbetween?
__________________
beer_stan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:53 AM   #2
wdevauld
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 29
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

The level of your boil was not likely the problem. I have seen several different brewers do their thing, and even amongst the best the idea of a rolling boil varies quite a bit. As long as the water is rolling you are good.

Although sanitation is very important in this case it is not likely your problem, I believe you pitched your yeast into water that was too hot and may have killed them.

Yeast should be activated/started at your fermentation temperature. I usually cool down the boiled water in an ice bath to get it to my fermentation temperature. A cheap 'instant read' digital thermometer from the grocery store can be a great start on checking you temperatures before pitching.

Do not worry; repitch some fresh yeast and you should be good to go. As for a good resource, the homebrewtalk forums are contain some of the best advice and knowledgeable people you may ever find, just keep digging around here and asking questions.

__________________
wdevauld is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:53 AM   #3
masterfool101
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, California
Posts: 272
Liked 19 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

My guess, you tried to rehydrate the yeast in water that was too hot, and killed it. However, the ONLY way to know for sure is to take a hydrometer fading and find out if its fermenting. It may be fermenting, even if you're not seeing physical signs of it.

IMO, there is no better book than Palmer. You just have to use common sense ... If you read the chapter on cleaning and sanitation, he's very clear that ANYTHING that touches the wort after the boil must be sanitized. He is also pretty Clark in stating that the water you rehydrate the yeast in should be cooled to pitching temps prior to rehydrating.

My advice: take the hydrometer reading. If its not fermenting (meaning your gravity hasn't changed from when you first pitched the yeast), hen simply pitch new yeast. Remember to let the sanitized (boiled) water sit until it comes down to room temperature prior to rehydrating. Alternately, with most dry yeast, simply sprinkling it over the top of the wort will work.

__________________

Nothing Beats a Fool's Luck . . . and I am the Master Fool.

masterfool101 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:57 AM   #4
JohnnyO
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Hamden, CT
Posts: 8,767
Liked 892 Times on 840 Posts
Likes Given: 491

Default

A few things.

Its important that we have sanitary practices and sanitize, not sterilize the equipment.
You should be fine wuth your fermenter.

Im concerned you may have killed the yeast with the high temps. If you have another packet, hydrate it and pitch.

Depending on your elevation, water typically boils, and stays at 212F. It doesn't get hotter, it just boils off. The more rolling you get your boil, the better however.

__________________
Fermenting: Stout, Pumpkin Ale
Drinking: Pale Ale, German Pilsner, Cider
On Deck: IPA, Brown Ale
JohnnyO is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:57 AM   #5
Bamsdealer
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Collegeville, Pa
Posts: 782
Liked 33 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

You will need more yeast. Hot water will kill it. Get your hands on some as fast as possible.

The boil shouldn't matter that much, just be sure to keep the lid off. Try to keeps rolling boil next time

__________________
Bamsdealer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:58 AM   #6
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,102
Liked 179 Times on 163 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Repitch. Dry yeast should be rehydrated at approx 102-104F, steaming is way too hot. After rehydrating, you slowly temper the yeast mixture with your wort to get them within 10-15F of each other before pitching. Ideally you would want them both about 2 degrees below your fermentation temp and let it rise to your optimum temp as the yeast become active.

__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:59 AM   #7
GeorgiaTiger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Marietta, Ga
Posts: 414
Liked 73 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 70

Default

First of all...WELCOME to HBT! Secondly, Merry Chritmas!

Ill try to answer this from my limited knowledge...If Im wrong, one of the others will be along soon to correct me -

The temperature of the wort boil changed (the book didn't mention any specific boil temperature, just to 'boil it'). It went from a light boil to a heavy boil a few times.
I dont think you really need to worry about this too much. Boil is boil. Dont sweat this one.

I didn't sterilize the entire fermenting bucket. Again, the instructions said to fill it with 5 gallons of sterilized water. I have a 6 gallon bucket, so there was some headroom that was not sterilized. Well, this could present a problem or it may not. Generally, you want to use the star-san or whatever you have for sterilizer to fill the bucket you are using for a fermenter (or carboy). You really should sanitize ANY parts of ANYTHING that will touch the post boiled wort. That upper 1.5 gallons may not touch the wort, or it may if you slosh the bucket or move it. Even if it does, it still may not cause an infection. Nothing you can do about it now - live and learn.

The book said to boil water, and then use it to mix the yeast. The water was still steaming slightly (but about 5 minutes off a boil) when I mixed in the yeast. Well, this one im not REAL sure about, but if that water was above the temps recommended on the yeast package, you may get some off flavors from it. Usually if you boil the water to rehydrate the yeast, it should cool first to 65-70 degrees. The yeast package will tell you the optimum range for temps for pitching the yeast and people around here recommend pitching it at the LOW end of that range.

It has been >72 hours, and so far as I can tell nothing is happening. If the water that was used to rehydrate the yeast was steaming hot, it may have killed the yeast and you may need to repitch the yeast. Im not absolutely certain that this is exactly correct so I would wait on some of the gurus around here to answer this question. It does take sometimes up to 72 hours for anything to start happening and you cant go by what your airlock is doing (bubbling or not).

I hope this helped a little. again, if Im wrong, the gurus will be along...just give em a little time.

__________________

Allen
"Im an airlock sniffer...I sniff airlocks"
Primary 1: Empty
Primary 2 (LBK): Empty
On Deck - IPA of some sort
Bottled - Irish Red Ale
Wicked Gnome HomeBrewing

GeorgiaTiger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:59 AM   #8
snyklez
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 118
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

New myself, just brewed my 7th yesterday, but I'll throw my two cents in. First, the boil shouldn't matter as long as you didn't scorch the wort on the bottom. Second, Palmer's book is excellent, however there's no substitute for your own experience. You'll learn the best methods for you as you go. Third, sterilize EVERYTHING that touches the post boil wort. I wash then spray my fermenters with starsan. I'm meticulous - as you should be - with sanitization. Lastly, I would re-pitch. Yeast is very finicky about temperature. You may have killed a lot of them if the hydrating water was too hot (80° +). I boil my rehydrating water toward the end of my wort boil, put a top on it and stick it in the freezer. I then take the temp every so often till it reaches 70°, then rehydrate the yeast. It usually works out that the yeast is rehydrated by the time my wort is at pitching temp. Good luck, and merry Christmas.

__________________
snyklez is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 05:59 AM   #9
GeorgiaTiger
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Marietta, Ga
Posts: 414
Liked 73 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 70

Default

DAMMIT! Im SLOW!!! No one had answered this question and I typed this book. LOL

__________________

Allen
"Im an airlock sniffer...I sniff airlocks"
Primary 1: Empty
Primary 2 (LBK): Empty
On Deck - IPA of some sort
Bottled - Irish Red Ale
Wicked Gnome HomeBrewing

GeorgiaTiger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-25-2012, 06:00 AM   #10
snyklez
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 118
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTiger
DAMMIT! Im SLOW!!! No one had answered this question and I typed this book. LOL
Ha ha, me too.
__________________
snyklez is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with a warm weather brew. chetduggan Recipes/Ingredients 3 06-18-2012 03:06 PM
too warm to brew a Kolsch? txinga Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 03-28-2011 02:03 PM
Will my brew carbonate if i warm it up? McMalty Bottling/Kegging 3 02-10-2011 03:38 AM
Warm Brew gs10 General Beer Discussion 6 09-14-2009 04:06 AM
Analyzing warm brew?...! eschatz General Beer Discussion 6 08-11-2008 02:13 PM