Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway - Last Chance to Enter!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > First Brew! 1 week in Primary.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-21-2013, 07:32 PM   #1
rossypete
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default First Brew! 1 week in Primary.

Just wanted to update y'all from last time.

I took all the suggestions I got and reformulated the recipe.

8lbs Light LE
.5lb Rye
.5lb Caramel 60
2oz Cascade @ 60
2oz Centennial @ 45
2oz Cascade @15

Add a little yeast and it's been sitting for 1 week. It's my first one, but I have patience. Going to let it sit in primary for another 1.5-2 weeks. Then putting it in the kegs and sitting for another 2 weeks.

Can't wait to see how it turns out. Ready for the hops. What are y'alls initial thoughts? Anything I should do differently about the fermenting process?

Ideas and Recipes always welcome.

Stay Hoppy.

__________________
rossypete is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:40 PM   #2
WDT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 297
Liked 19 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

Planning on dry hopping it? Looks like that beer might punch you in the face a little bit. I'd move the centennial later in the boil next time. Maybe push it to your 15min addition and put your last 2oz of Cascade to flamout and let them steep for a few minutes before chilling.

__________________
WDT is offline
rossypete Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:47 PM   #3
progmac
Sponsor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Cincy, OH
Posts: 1,843
Liked 234 Times on 192 Posts
Likes Given: 309

Default

if it's done fermenting, you can cold crash (i'm guessing you can since you mentioned kegs), then dryhop in the primary and then rack after 7 days...or you can do something different. whatever makes you happy

__________________
Vessel - a 7.1 gallon stainless steel fermenter
на здравје!
progmac is offline
rossypete Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:48 PM   #4
rossypete
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WDT View Post
Planning on dry hopping it? Looks like that beer might punch you in the face a little bit. I'd move the centennial later in the boil next time. Maybe push it to your 15min addition and put your last 2oz of Cascade to flamout and let them steep for a few minutes before chilling.
I figured I might get punched in the face. I added the Centennial more like 35 mins, I know thats not a huge difference. I put the last half of malt in at the end as well. I'm taking notes WDT and appreciate the input.

I knew going into it, it was a risk. If it's good, I'll send you one. If it's not... I'll probably drink it anyways.

Thanks for the insight. Glad to have found this site.
__________________
rossypete is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:50 PM   #5
rossypete
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post
if it's done fermenting, you can cold crash (i'm guessing you can since you mentioned kegs), then dryhop in the primary and then rack after 7 days...or you can do something different. whatever makes you happy
Prog... can we talk about what "Cold Crashing" is? Your knowledge has overwhelmed me. Ha.

Thanks.
__________________
rossypete is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:53 PM   #6
peanasky
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central WI
Posts: 114
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

"Cold Crashing" is when you place the beer at a fairly cold temperature (usually just above freezing point) to encourage the yeast and other "floaties" to fall down to the bottom of the vessel. Helps you get a real clear/clean beer. Not always necessary, but helps move the conditioning along. Also results in less sediment in bottles, or in your case, the kegs.

__________________
peanasky is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 07:57 PM   #7
rossypete
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 14
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peanasky View Post
"Cold Crashing" is when you place the beer at a fairly cold temperature (usually just above freezing point) to encourage the yeast and other "floaties" to fall down to the bottom of the vessel. Helps you get a real clear/clean beer. Not always necessary, but helps move the conditioning along. Also results in less sediment in bottles, or in your case, the kegs.
Thanks Pea. When does one usually cold crash? Do you cold crash right before you put it in kegs? Stupid Question?
__________________
rossypete is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 09:39 PM   #8
peanasky
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central WI
Posts: 114
Liked 8 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

No problem Cold crashing usually takes place before you put it in kegs. Ideally you cold crash your beer and then put it directly in the kegs w/o giving the beer time to warm up (assuming you force carb) and w/o disturbing the trub too much. This keeps your beer sparkling clear

__________________
peanasky is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-21-2013, 09:43 PM   #9
Kahless
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Glasgow, Scotland :P
Posts: 117
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Quote:
Thanks Pea. When does one usually cold crash? Do you cold crash right before you put it in kegs? Stupid Question?
Once your final gravity has been reached, and has been confirmed over say a 3 day period, you can begin to cold crash. That 3 day period isn't just good for making sure it has stopped fermenting - It's also good for giving the yeast some time to clean up (e.g. diacetyl rest) before cold crashing, although I usually do as you plan and leave it for a few weeks and then measure.
__________________
Kahless is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-22-2013, 02:17 AM   #10
WDT
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 297
Liked 19 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

You'll have beer when it's done and learn a lot from this batch. Pretty gutsy doing an IPA for your first batch. Hope it turns out good.

Cascade and centennial play real nice together, classic west coast flavor. Good choices on your hops.

__________________
WDT is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Extra Week of Primary vs Extra Week in Bottles kcbrewcom Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 18 11-16-2012 08:12 PM
4 week primary sgraham602 Fermentation & Yeast 6 11-02-2012 04:50 PM
F.G. 1.022 after a week in primary davemurphy15 Fermentation & Yeast 3 03-05-2012 01:30 PM
Gravity too high after 1 week in primary? (First brew) sundropforlife Fermentation & Yeast 53 02-01-2012 01:40 AM
OK to sit in primary another week? LarryC Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 10-17-2009 03:08 PM