Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Filtering your beer?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-07-2008, 02:37 AM   #1
GatorBait
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5
Default Filtering your beer?

I'm really new to home brewing, but I must say I absolutely love it. I just finished the last bottle from my first batch (a red ale), and my second batch (summer ale) is in the primary fermenter at the moment.

Anyway, My first batch had a small layer of sediment at the bottom of each bottle. It doesn't bother me too much, but my poker buddies weren't big fans. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of a good filtration system or knows some good tips for clearing up your brew.

Thanks!

-Bobby E.

__________________
GatorBait is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 02:44 AM   #2
Rhys79
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Bend, Indiana
Posts: 160
Default

That layer of sediment was the yeast that carbonated your beer. Unless you plan to force carbonate your bottles (Obviously it can be done, the commercial breweries do it, but I don't think you want to spend THAT much money on equipment...), or you want to drink flat beer, you WANT that layer of sediment. Homebrew generally is not drank straight from the bottle. You poor it out into a glass and leave a 1/2 inch or so of beer at the bottom of the bottle with the sediment. The other option is to keg, which again, is not generally cheap for the equipment. Glad to hear your first brew came out good though. I had some trouble with mine (sanitation mistake during bottling ). Second batch should go better though I hope... It's a Coopers Real Ale in the primary at the moment.

__________________
Rhys79 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 02:46 AM   #3
mdowns63
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
mdowns63's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 34
Default

I would tell my friends to stop whining or buy their own beer!!!

I'm also a new brewer, but I think the only way to avoid this sediment is to move on to kegging your beer and filtering it beforehand, since the yeast is necessary to carbonate your beer in the bottle.

Oh and you could pour the beers into cups and leave the sediment in the bottom of the bottle. This has worked for me in keeping most of the sediment in the bottle.

__________________
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Primary: #5 EdWort's Apfelwein
Secondary: #3 Amarillo Amber Ale
Lagering: #4 Bavarian Helles
Bottle: empty
Drinking: #2: Hoegaarden Clone
mdowns63 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 03:09 AM   #4
c.n.budz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c.n.budz's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Pistol Wavin' New Haven, for now...
Posts: 3,154
Liked 23 Times on 18 Posts

Default

Yup, unless you keg you need that yeast to carb your beer. Kegging isn't that expensive. If you put the pieces together on your own and keep an eye on places like craigslist it can be done for a couple hundred dollars

__________________
Knucklehead Brewery, Est. 2007

Always do sober what you do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut. -Ernest Hemingway
c.n.budz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 10:39 AM   #5
Tommish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 97
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdowns63
Oh and you could pour the beers into cups and leave the sediment in the bottom of the bottle. This has worked for me in keeping most of the sediment in the bottle.
+1 for using a glass. I have a couple of friends who drink homebrew without one but they are actively seeking the yeasty flavor. If you don't like to taste yeast, use a glass.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by zacster
Just remember, it doesn't have to be perfect to be really good beer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aust1227
I am glad you think my keg is cute.
Tommish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 02:55 PM   #6
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

You can use finings (isinglass, gelatin, polyclar, etc.) to clear or let the batch sit longer (3-4 weeks) before racking for bottling. Both methods will mean longer carbonation times since there is less yeast. But that also means less residue in the bottles.

You can also use highly flocculate yeasts or yeasts that form tight cakes.

However, removing all of the yeast would mean no carbonation. It is also rather difficult and requires 0.5 micron filters that are expensive and a pain to work with.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 09:32 PM   #7
GatorBait
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5
Default

Wow, thanks for all your responses.

I thought that might be the case, and I agree with mdowns, if they don't like it, they can buy their own.

I think down the road I'll give kegging a try, and for now I'll stick to pouring into a glass.

Besides, does anything beat an ice-cold brew in a frosty mug?

__________________
GatorBait is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 09:40 PM   #8
sonetlumiere85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 389
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Depends on who you ask. Some people would say that most beers aren't meant to be consumed ice-cold. Most ales are good around 45-55 degrees. But yes, brewing your own beer is an awesome hobby, and you could always encourage your friends to do it themselves, they'll get a better understanding of why that sediment is there by observing the process.

__________________
sonetlumiere85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 09:46 PM   #9
GilaMinumBeer
In yo' garage, steelin' yo parts.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
GilaMinumBeer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Oblivion
Posts: 47,119
Liked 4638 Times on 4319 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorBait
I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of a good filtration system or knows some good tips for clearing up your brew.

Thanks!

-Bobby E.
My liver. The beer always comes out a crystal yellow after it has had a single pass through it.
__________________
GilaMinumBeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-07-2008, 10:04 PM   #10
WortMonger
United States Mashtronaut
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WortMonger's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Edmond, OK, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,133
Liked 28 Times on 27 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

LOL, "my liver." I have to chime in here with a +1 to not filtering. I have ran into the same problem before with people wanting to drink from the bottle. I try to explain that they won't get to smell the beer and appreciate the late hops or whatever I was trying for the beer, but to no avail. They are trained to drink from the bottle and that is what they like.

Saying this, I haven't worried about it in a while since going to kegging. I even naturally carbonate my kegs and could bottle from them with zero sediment after blowing the foam off a couple of the first pints of cloudy beer. I personally don't have a problem drinking someone else's beer with sediment in the bottom, because it is going in a glass so I can appreciate it (or condemn in some cases). I was hung up on thinking about filtration for the longest time before kegging, but after a few kegs I changed my mind. I would keep doing what you have been doing and tell them to bring their own or learn how to drink a crafted beer out of a frickin glass like you are supposed to.

__________________
"Beer... Nutritious and Delicious!"

"It's like a 15.5 gallon Mr. Beer!"
WortMonger is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beer Filtering Norest Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 04-15-2013 03:16 PM
Filtering Beer AdamCanFly General Techniques 12 10-02-2009 02:27 AM
Filtering beer MrMoose Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 06-07-2009 05:33 PM
Beer Filtering skipdog General Techniques 6 12-06-2007 06:25 PM
Filtering Beer MONST3R General Techniques 5 02-03-2007 10:06 PM