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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Filtering the sediment during bottling?
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Old 01-28-2010, 07:35 PM   #1
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Default Filtering the sediment during bottling?

I used a Mr. Beer kit thing.. in case that has anything to do with this. Although my questions are pretty basic in nature so i didn't see a point in posting them under the Mr. Beer thread.

Filter
When i'm bottling the beers can i use something to filter out the yeast that's sitting on the bottom of the keg? or do i need that to stay in there for the bottles to carbonate?

Wood Chips
I've been to the Budweiser factory something like 50-60 times since i was like 12. I love their tour.. when we went to Six Flags that's really where i wanted to go

Anyway something i remember about their fermentation process, they use wood chips at the bottom of their kegs.. or umm.. fermentors? i really don't know what to call them, they are a lot bigger then the mr. beer set up.

Anyway, wood chips. . . What are they for? is that something i can use? And if i can how would i go about using them? would i have to sanitize them first or something?

Smart Water
I realize that water is supposed to be one of the more important ingredients, so i used the little filter thingy on the sink when i was making beer for the first time. But I really want to use the best water i can to keep my beer in good shape. So i was wondering if Smart Water would be a good idea? or is there some water in particular that's preferred? I was worried that Smart Water might have been missing some yeast or chemical or something that the beer would need during the fermentation process.

I used filtered water for every step of the process even when i had to boil the wort and i'm pretty sure boiling it would have fixed any problems anyway. So i'm taking this water thing pretty seriously. Think it worked out cause the batch ended up being awesome.

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Old 01-28-2010, 07:50 PM   #2
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Not familiar with Mr Beer, but all fermenters end up with sediment on the bottom. When you bottle or keg, you just avoid sucking that sediment out.

The beer does need yeats to carbonate in the bottles, but you don't really need to grab any of that sediment.... there is plenty of live yeast still floating around in the beer.

You can read about beechwood aging here:
http://www.byo.com/stories/wizard/ar...in-my-homebrew
I honestly wouldn't bother with it, but you can do what you want.

And, finally... Smart Water....

I have no idea what that even is. I just use my tap water. No filtering or anything.

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Old 01-28-2010, 08:20 PM   #3
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Congrats on a great first batch!

You don't need to filter, that would oxidize your beer, just don't suck up the sediment. There is plenty of yeast still left in suspension to carb up your bottles.

I wouldn't start aging on wood until you get a few batches in, it's done to add more complex flavors to your finished product.

Use your tap water, it sounds like it worked very well for your first batch. If it ain't broke don't fix it!

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Old 01-28-2010, 08:22 PM   #4
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+1 to Walker. In regards to the filtering, you could use a sanitized muslin bag to wrap around your racking cain to help filter out some of the large floating particles. However, you will still have yeast that are still in suspension...but that's fine, because you'll need them to still be present to help with bottle conditioning.

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Old 01-28-2010, 08:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walker View Post
Not familiar with Mr Beer, but all fermenters end up with sediment on the bottom. When you bottle or keg, you just avoid sucking that sediment out.

The beer does need yeats to carbonate in the bottles, but you don't really need to grab any of that sediment.... there is plenty of live yeast still floating around in the beer.

You can read about beechwood aging here:
http://www.byo.com/stories/wizard/ar...in-my-homebrew
I honestly wouldn't bother with it, but you can do what you want.

And, finally... Smart Water....

I have no idea what that even is. I just use my tap water. No filtering or anything.
My tap water seems to be perfect for the kind of ales I like according to my local HBS. I would get a water test kit and compare it against the style yuo are going for if you are really concerned, but I havent had any bad batches with my tap water.

From the yeast perspective you will have yeast that falls out of suspension. Just dont get crazy with your racking to your bottling bucket. Pay attention to your siphon when racking... if you see alot of material going through either stop shaking so much or just lift it off the bottom. You will need yeast to carbonate, but there is usually ample in the beer already
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:04 PM   #6
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Well the last batch was kinda screwed up.

Mr. Beer is kind of a cheapo way to start, it does 2 gallons and there's no siphon involved it's just one of those little plastic things you pour lemonade out of.. if that makes sense.

I had to move the fermenter when i was bottling and well.. i had a helper who ended up shaking the damn thing up. I thought they knew better since they've done it before.. but what can i do. At least they were willing to help so i appreciated that.

So i had a lot of sediment in every bottle, it settled on the bottom but it's bugging the **** out of me, so i just want to keep out as much as possible on the next go.

I guess i'll stay away from the beach wood for awhile, and i might try out that muslin bag trick..

Oh i got another question.. what's a bottling bucket? i just went straight from the keg deally to the bottles.. i mean the whole system is kind of dumbed down i'm supposed to according to the instructions. But eventually i plan on using better equipment so i'd kind of like to know.

Thank you everyone for the info! and the congratulations! i'm really proud, drinking beer i made :P i was really worried it'd suck the first few times.

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Old 01-28-2010, 10:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
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So i had a lot of sediment in every bottle, it settled on the bottom but it's bugging the **** out of me, so i just want to keep out as much as possible on the next go.

I guess i'll stay away from the beach wood for awhile, and i might try out that muslin bag trick..
Define "a lot of sediment".... 1/4 inch? 1/2 inch? 1 inch?

You will always have some sediment in bottle conditioned beer. There's no way to avoid it.

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Oh i got another question.. what's a bottling bucket? i just went straight from the keg deally to the bottles.. i mean the whole system is kind of dumbed down i'm supposed to according to the instructions. But eventually i plan on using better equipment so i'd kind of like to know.
Folks will generally transfer their beer out of their large fermenters and into a bucket that has a spigot attached to it, like this:



You attach a hose and (usually) a little plastic, spring-tipped item called a "bottling wand" to the spigot to make bottling easy. You just press the spring tip of the wand against the bottom of the bottle and beer flows. When you get the bottle full, you lift the tip off the bottom of the bottle and the spring closes the little valve, stopping the flow.
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:28 PM   #8
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You attach a hose and (usually) a little plastic, spring-tipped item called a "bottling wand" to the spigot to make bottling easy. You just press the spring tip of the wand against the bottom of the bottle and beer flows. When you get the bottle full, you lift the tip off the bottom of the bottle and the spring closes the little valve, stopping the flow.

I have a question about this. I will have my beer in the secondary bucket soon, and it has the standard spigot on the side. I am brewing a Belgian IPA, so there will be a lot of hoppy sediment along with the yeast. Is it a good idea (or even feasable) to put some sort of filter (like cheese cloth or something similar) on the inside of the bucket, over the hole of the spigot, to keep the hops out of the bottles? Yeast will still be able to filter through, I assume. But this would keep the hops out.

I posed this to a few homebrew guys I know, and they were of the opinion that having a bit of the hops in there is ok. If it isn't a huge amount of trouble, I would just rather filter more of the hops out. I just would want to make sure that enough yeast was getting through for the bottle conditioning. And, also, I would want to make sure it wasn't a pain in the butt to affix and/or clean.
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Old 01-28-2010, 10:37 PM   #9
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No filtering, it will oxidize your beer! Just rack over top the trub.

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Old 01-28-2010, 10:50 PM   #10
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i think the confusion here is he's not "racking" at all. he's using a mr beer kit. a mr. beer kit, you don't have a secondary, or a bottling bucket, and you don't use a racking cane. everyone is right, don't filter the beer from the fermentor to the bottle, but you can't simply "rack over top of the trub", because you don't "rack" with a mr. beer kit. it's kind of like a party pig, it just has a little twist open/close spigot on the front of it, and you open it to let the beer pour out, and turn it the other way to close it again.

i would just sit the mr. beer "keg" onto a counter, and let it rest for an hour or so, to make sure all the sediment is on the bottom, maybe even elivate the front end of it so that the sediment will pool on the bottom backside of the "keg", then bottle slowly, and if you want to be absolutely sure you have zero sediment, leave the last little bit of beer in the keg instead of bottling it. you'll still probably have a bit of sediment in the bottle, but just decant the beer into a glass slowly and carefully, and leave the last tiny bit of beer and sediment in the bottom of the bottle.
hope that helps!

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