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Old 08-12-2013, 06:14 PM   #1
dsen31
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Default Fermintation question. First time brewer. Started on this last Saturday

Hello all. Hope someone can provide me with an answer or tell me what I did wrong. So I purchased a kit on Saturday along with a recipe and ingredients for a Nut Brown Ale. The directions said that I should see "bubbling" in the airlock for about three days. After the first day the bubbling subsided and has now completely stopped. Is there any reason why this has stopped? Is there anyway to fix it before it's too late?

Any input is appreciated and feel free to criticize. I want to get better.

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:17 PM   #2
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You could have a small leak or it's already through the rigorous part of fermentation. It said "about" three days. What temperature do you have it at? Let it go for 7-10 days, check the gravity to make sure it is done. Then you can let it go a bit longer to clear and clean up any off flavors or bottle it up. I would recommend a minimum of 14 days in the primary though before you do anything.

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:21 PM   #3
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From my limited knowledge it might be related to temperature and what tolerance the yeast you are using has with fluctuating temperature. That's just me guessing as I am also a beginner

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:21 PM   #4
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I would recommend a minimum of 14 days in the primary though before you do anything.
14 days no matter what? Even if it's "done" fermenting? Again, very new at this.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:22 PM   #5
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What are you fermenting in? Carboy or Plastic Bucket?

Buckets are quite commonly known for not sealing well and therefore the pressure builds and escapes someplace besides the airlock.

Airlock activity (or lack of) is not a good and useful sign of fermentation.

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:23 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by brewkinger View Post
What are you fermenting in? Carboy or Plastic Bucket?

Buckets are quite commonly known for not sealing well and therefore the pressure builds and escapes someplace besides the airlock.

Airlock activity (or lack of) is not a good and useful sign of fermentation.

Relax, Don't Worry, and Have a Home Brew
It's a glass carboy. 6.5 gallon.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:24 PM   #7
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If it ferments at too high a temp it can finish pretty fast, especially for a low OG beer like a nut brown ale. Fermentation temp is different from room temp-fermentation creates heat so that the fermentation temp will be 5-8 degrees warmer than room temp. Controlling fermentation temp is the one thing that made the biggest difference in my beer quality.

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Old 08-12-2013, 06:28 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by dsen31 View Post
14 days no matter what? Even if it's "done" fermenting? Again, very new at this.
Yeast get really fired up when they first get in the bucket with all that sugar around. As they start munching away, just like us, they get a few byproducts coming out. Unlike us, they go back and "clean up" after themselves. This will reduce some off flavors and more importantly, ensures you reach final gravity. The first few days may knock your gravity from 1.05 to 1.02, but to get down to 1.01 may take an additional 7 - 10 days. Patience will always reward you with better beer. Once you get more experience and have the capabilities to really hone your temperatures and entire process, that time frame can be shortened. I've been doing this for a year now and still go at least 10 - 14 days.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:29 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by corkybstewart View Post
If it ferments at too high a temp it can finish pretty fast, especially for a low OG beer like a nut brown ale. Fermentation temp is different from room temp-fermentation creates heat so that the fermentation temp will be 5-8 degrees warmer than room temp. Controlling fermentation temp is the one thing that made the biggest difference in my beer quality.
Thank you!
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistr25 View Post
Yeast get really fired up when they first get in the bucket with all that sugar around. As they start munching away, just like us, they get a few byproducts coming out. Unlike us, they go back and "clean up" after themselves. This will reduce some off flavors and more importantly, ensures you reach final gravity. The first few days may knock your gravity from 1.05 to 1.02, but to get down to 1.01 may take an additional 7 - 10 days. Patience will always reward you with better beer. Once you get more experience and have the capabilities to really hone your temperatures and entire process, that time frame can be shortened. I've been doing this for a year now and still go at least 10 - 14 days.
Okay. I appreciate it. what temperature do you usually ferment at, for a brown ale?
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