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Old 06-19-2013, 01:16 AM   #71
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My nonchalant attitude towards temps, and yeast for that matter (never make starters, just approximate amount of trub for the gravity) has no ill effects on the finished product according to its number one consumer -- Me . I've noticed no off flavors or lacking qualities in my beer.
And that's the key- if you're happy with the finished beer that is all that really matters.

For my taste, nottingham over 70 degrees tastes foul, so I use other yeast strains if I have to pitch warmer than 66 degrees. But that's for MY taste. I normally pitch at 62-64 degrees and then let the beer rise naturally to 66 degrees for fermentation.

Some people have much different perceptions of taste than I do, so we all need to make beer that we love.
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:42 AM   #72
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I too am firmly in the pitch low and let rise camp.

Yeast are quickly going to get overactive in hot wort and start producing even more heat than normal. If you do manage to force the temp lower while the yeast are in full swing you'll probably cause them to go dormant for a bit. Now you're in this yo-yo game of yeast activity. I'm not sure if starting and stopping fermentation has negative effects on the flavor or not but it seems a lot less controlled and consistent.

If you pitch low the yeast already weren't active (unless your starter still had krausen) so the gradual warming will gently wake them up and they will smoothly transition right into activity in an environment that was never too hot, so the temp increase will be pretty linear and then level off right where you want it. Easy to repeat if done correctly.

If I didn't manage to cool my wort enough before transferring to the fermentor I don't sweat it a bit. I let the chest freezer bring it down over the next few hours and I pitch when it's where I want it. I use pure O2 and I don't aerate until it's at temp.

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Old 06-19-2013, 02:03 AM   #73
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What about Belgian or Bavarian yeast? I'm about to make a hefe with a Bavarian strain, and really like the banana flavor over the clove flavor that some of these exhibit. I've heard higher temps contribute to more banana than clove- what temp should I target for a mid to high banana and low clove taste?

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Old 06-19-2013, 02:32 AM   #74
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My nonchalant attitude towards variance of a few degrees in pitching temps, and yeast for that matter (never make starters, just approximate amount of trub for the gravity) has no noticeable ill effects on the finished product according to its number one consumer -- Me . The two-hearted clone keg that just kicked could a fooled me, but I'll admit I have an unsophisticated palate.
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And that's the key- if you're happy with the finished beer that is all that really matters.

For my taste, nottingham over 70 degrees tastes foul, so I use other yeast strains if I have to pitch warmer than 66 degrees. But that's for MY taste. I normally pitch at 62-64 degrees and then let the beer rise naturally to 66 degrees for fermentation.

Some people have much different perceptions of taste than I do, so we all need to make beer that we love.
Exactly. It's all about brewing what's good for you. And for me a few degrees can make a big difference. The first couple years I was brewing I made a lot of pale ales and IPA's with WL001 and I just couldn't seem to get it right - there was always this character to the beer that I couldn't place but didn't like, even though my friends thought the beers were great. I was fermenting around 71* as that's in the middle of the White Labs published range. Then I read a quote from Vinny Cilurzo on chico yeast fermenting over 68* spitting out diacetyl, I realized that is exactly what I was tasting. Now I always ferment mid to low 60's and the beers taste so much better to me.
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