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Old 10-04-2012, 12:23 PM   #1
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Default Fermenting temperatures

So, I am about to transfer my first brew to secondary fermentation and I am looking to see what my second bee should be. I would love to do a hefe, a witbier, or a stout. However all the recipes I have found say they the need to ferment at less than 70 degrees F. The problem is that I live in an apartment and there is no where in the apt that I can ferment that will be that cold. Is it possible to make any of these beers fermenting at like 72 degrees or will that destroy the beer?

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Old 10-04-2012, 12:50 PM   #2
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Temperature control during fermentation is key to making great beer. I live in an apartment and have utilized the swamp cooler method to keep temps in check. Your beer is not destroyed fermenting at 72 however you may pick up unwanted esters (fruity flavors). A rubbermaid tote bin and frozen 2 liter bottles of water should serve you well. Cheers

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Old 10-04-2012, 12:58 PM   #3
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You can also look to swapping out the prescribed yeast for the recipe with one of similar profile with greater temperature flexibility. Hefes and Wit's have flavor profiles that depend on certain ester flavors, and slightly warmer temperatures will generally accentuate those flavors. A stout will generally have enough roasted malt flavors coming through to hide the difference of a couple of degrees and theres a number of neutral flavored yeasts that do well in the 72 degree area. Your desired beer choices should be fairly safe if you haven't got the option of fermentation temperature control.

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Old 10-04-2012, 01:12 PM   #4
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ive had some really nice wits at about that temp. You could do that while you look into a swamp cooler. I use the ice chest and frozen 2 liters deal, it not ideal but it works.

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Old 10-04-2012, 01:27 PM   #5
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Just to clarify, when you say you can ferment at 72 degrees, are you meaning the room you ferment in will be 72 degrees or the temperature of the beer itself? Fermenting in a room at 72 degrees will leave the beer at 77 degrees or higher when you add in the usual 5-10 degree increase in temp from yeast activity. That could possibly add some unwanted off flavors and even fusel alcohol that you wouldn't want.

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Old 10-04-2012, 01:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikecshultz View Post
So, I am about to transfer my first brew to secondary fermentation and I am looking to see what my second bee should be. I would love to do a hefe, a witbier, or a stout. However all the recipes I have found say they the need to ferment at less than 70 degrees F. The problem is that I live in an apartment and there is no where in the apt that I can ferment that will be that cold. Is it possible to make any of these beers fermenting at like 72 degrees or will that destroy the beer?
Hello Mikeshultz, take a look at saison brews (lawnmower beers), the saison yeast is meant to ferment in hot temps, I do one that likes 85 deg, look at the yeast temp ranges on the brews and Im sure you will find one that works for you, with or without a swamp cooler.

Good luck
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkeller12
Just to clarify, when you say you can ferment at 72 degrees, are you meaning the room you ferment in will be 72 degrees or the temperature of the beer itself? Fermenting in a room at 72 degrees will leave the beer at 77 degrees or higher when you add in the usual 5-10 degree increase in temp from yeast activity. That could possibly add some unwanted off flavors and even fusel alcohol that you wouldn't want.
I am pretty sure the temp in the apt is colder than 72. But the temp strip on the outside of the 6.5 gallon glass carboy I am fermenting in us at 72 degrees. Although occasionally it gets down to 70. I don't know if that means the beer is that temp or that is just the temperature of the glass.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:55 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromebrew
ive had some really nice wits at about that temp. You could do that while you look into a swamp cooler. I use the ice chest and frozen 2 liters deal, it not ideal but it works.
Do you have the recipes for the wits that you made? I would love to start brewing a wit this weekend.
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:02 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by mikecshultz View Post
I am pretty sure the temp in the apt is colder than 72. But the temp strip on the outside of the 6.5 gallon glass carboy I am fermenting in us at 72 degrees. Although occasionally it gets down to 70. I don't know if that means the beer is that temp or that is just the temperature of the glass.
Hello, the beer in the fermenting vessel will only be about 2 degrees warmer or cooler than the strip on the outside, since the beer and glass have a lot of contact area.

Cheers
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:40 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikecshultz View Post
Do you have the recipes for the wits that you made? I would love to start brewing a wit this weekend.
Sorry for the delayed response. Here is a Wit that i have had great success with:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f71/ohio...lone-ag-37991/

I have terrible efficiency so i ended up adding some honey post boil. I also added some additional corriander and peel to the secondary. I dont see any reason to buy the bitter peel, just get a zester and go to town on a navel orange, but thats just me

PM me if you have any questions!
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