Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > fermenting hot
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-20-2009, 04:28 AM   #1
kendrid
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 76
Default fermenting hot

I am brewing the Austin Homebrew honey wheat partial mash. It's my seventh batch.

I cooled it to 70 with my wort chiller and then added the dry yeast (SafBrew T58). I then put the fermenter on my basement floor (basement is around 70 degrees, floor is a bit colder).

I just checked and it's bubbling away but the temp is 79 degrees. I've never had a beer ferment this hot. Should I attempt to chill it back to the 70 range where I normally ferment at or will 79 be ok? The yeast is obviously working, maybe it's the honey that's making it go nuts and raise the temp that much?

Confused...

__________________
kendrid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2009, 04:45 AM   #2
giligson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Vancouver Area - Canada
Posts: 755
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Is the ambient temp hotter than it has been in the past?
Yes, if you expect it to taste like a clean wheat ale - you had better try cooling it down some.

__________________

We who are about to Brew, salute you!

giligson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2009, 04:49 AM   #3
kendrid
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 76
Default

The ambient temp isn't that much hotter than usual (maybe a few degrees).

I am moving it to the garage for the night. It will be in the mid 60s tonight so that should get it down a bit..hopefully.

edit: I moved it and wrapped it in towels soaked with cold water. Hopefully tonight it will get back down to normal.

__________________

kendrid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2009, 03:34 PM   #4
Hang Glider
Beer Drinker
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Hang Glider's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: North Augusta, SC
Posts: 3,159
Liked 149 Times on 119 Posts
Likes Given: 102

Default

Pick up a large cooler or tub for your fermenting. Set your bucket/carboy in that bucket, fill with water and cycle some frozen water bottles in it. The yeast activity will raise the temps well above ambient, and your will enjoh your best results if you can keep the fermentation within the range suggested by the yeast mfgr.

__________________
Hang Glider is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2009, 03:50 PM   #5
kendrid
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 76
Default

Thanks for the advice. This morning it was back down to 70 degrees. I put it back in my basement and will check it when I get home. I'll pick up a plastic tub to set it in to keep it cool during these summer months.

__________________
kendrid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2009, 04:01 PM   #6
SmugMug
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 654
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Cool that puppy off! With internal fermenting temps that high and the addition of honey, you're going to come out with a pretty astringent-tasting beer if you let it ride that high. I let me honey weizen ferment around 74 so I could get some of the weizen esters, but I still got some fusels even after 4 weeks in the bottle. The only thing I can think of (least common denominator) is the honey at higher temps.

__________________

-------------------------------------------------------------------
Poor planning on your part doesn't necessitate an emergency on mine.

Beer: Is there anything it can't do?

SmugMug is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2009, 04:54 AM   #7
kendrid
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 76
Default

Well, it remained at 70 after 12 hours.

It's history:
18th, 10:30PM Brewed/yeast added at 70 degrees.
19th, 10:30Pm I see it at 79. By 11 it's in the garage with outside temps in the 60s. A cold and wet towel is added.
20th, 7:30 am 70 degrees. Moved back to basement
20th, 8pm 70 degrees. No more bubbling (the airlock was going nuts the entire time). It either fermented all out in the high 70s or it's stalled or just trying to piss me off.

I wonder if this is my first ruined batch... I know, wait wait wait.

__________________
kendrid is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2009, 04:59 AM   #8
davesrose
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 967
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kendrid View Post
I wonder if this is my first ruined batch... I know, wait wait wait.
We preach fermenting at cooler temperatures to get a cleaner tasting beer. But even if you forget or don't know about fermentation temps....you'll still wind up with drinkable beer. More then likely, the beer will be sweeter tasting (though for this batch, looks like it was just a few hours at 79...so you minimized it): only you can say if warmer fermentation temps is a profile that you find great.
__________________
On Tap: Barleywine, Coffee Oatmeal Imperial Stout (big big beer)
Conditioning:Baltic Porter
Fermenting: Double Simcoe IPA
On the Bench: Racer 5 IPA


"One of the first things early caveman did, when he crawled out of the mudd, was to make beer. And cavemen everywhere are still making beer...and drinking beer." - Jean Sheperd
davesrose is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2009, 01:06 PM   #9
bull8042
I like 'em shaved
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bull8042's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Fort Mill, SC
Posts: 10,279
Liked 446 Times on 444 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

I would expect a fair bit of fusel production. Hopefully you caught it and got the temps down quick enough to minimize it, but longer conditioning may be in order to allow the "hot alcohol" flavors to subside a little.

__________________
"I brew with a water cooler and some part from the toilet." - JohnnyO

"I do gravity feed the last gallon or two through my Therminator, but I expect you could suck start a Volkswagen before you could suck start one of these. - GilaMinumBeer

"..... Bull was right." - TXCurtis
bull8042 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-10-2011, 04:49 AM   #10
Glongo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Verplanck, ny
Posts: 32
Default

Í also am having the same problem. I am a new home brewer and this is my first batch. I used a brew kit and hope to brew a nutbrown ale. My fermentation bucket was at 79 degrees for a couple of hours and bubbling like hell. It actually started bubbling just 10 hours after adding the yeast. Is this normal? Is the fermentation bucket suppose to be at a higher temperature when you first add it to the bucket after the boil? I used an ice bath to cool down the wort but the temp seemed to rise again. Right now I have it next to my a/c set at 64 degrees and the current temp of the fermentation bucket has dropped to 73 degrees. Am I too late? Do you think that my first batch is ruined?

__________________
Glongo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Not done fermenting? bluedragoon85 Extract Brewing 12 04-29-2009 03:33 AM
not fermenting out all the way bigjim74 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 12 01-19-2009 01:03 AM
S l o w fermenting worty Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 02-13-2008 01:19 AM
Done Fermenting? MidRex Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 11-20-2006 11:41 PM
Still Fermenting? Fuzz Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 11-13-2006 12:11 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS