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Old 12-02-2013, 06:21 AM   #1
WaltG
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Default Fermentation Temperature

Ok, so since I'm new to this I spend most of my free time reading, watching videos, etc. So today I was looking at fermentation temps. So out of curiosity I poked my thermometer (sanitized of course) into my 1-gallon fermenter. Came up with 75 degrees. Using safale us-05 which says 59-75.

Question is will it make a difference to bring the temp down a few degrees?

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Old 12-02-2013, 07:10 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by WaltG View Post
Ok, so since I'm new to this I spend most of my free time reading, watching videos, etc. So today I was looking at fermentation temps. So out of curiosity I poked my thermometer (sanitized of course) into my 1-gallon fermenter. Came up with 75 degrees. Using safale us-05 which says 59-75.

Question is will it make a difference to bring the temp down a few degrees?
75F is probably way too warm for 05 yeast. My experience with this strain has indicated it is much happier at 65-68. Others may give other numbers but I think most will suggest cooler than 75. Personally, I like to run 05 at 65-66F and have had decent results with it there. (I'm now using BRY-97 for most beers that I used to use 05 for.)

If it has been in the fermenter more than a couple of days it may not matter all that much at this point.
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:12 AM   #3
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75 is probably way too warm for 05 yeast. My experience with this strain has indicated it is much happier at 66-68. Others may give other numbers but I think most will suggest cooler than 75.

I wrapped a towel around it with a water bath, see what that does...
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Old 12-02-2013, 07:33 AM   #4
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I wrapped a towel around it with a water bath, see what that does...
Good move.
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Old 12-02-2013, 11:48 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaltG View Post
Ok, so since I'm new to this I spend most of my free time reading, watching videos, etc. So today I was looking at fermentation temps. So out of curiosity I poked my thermometer (sanitized of course) into my 1-gallon fermenter. Came up with 75 degrees. Using safale us-05 which says 59-75.

Question is will it make a difference to bring the temp down a few degrees?
It may or it may not depending on how long it has been fermenting at that temperature. Off flavors from fermenting too warm happen early in the fermenting and cooling the beer after they are produced won't make them go away. You need to start your beer fermenting at the lower end of the range and when the ferment slows you can let it warm up without off flavors developing.
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Old 12-02-2013, 11:55 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
It may or it may not depending on how long it has been fermenting at that temperature. Off flavors from fermenting too warm happen early in the fermenting and cooling the beer after they are produced won't make them go away. You need to start your beer fermenting at the lower end of the range and when the ferment slows you can let it warm up without off flavors developing.
This^^^^^^^^.

Next batch using US-05, get your wort chilled down into the low 60's before pitching and try to keep it in 64-65*F territory for the first few days until the krausen falls. After that, let it get up around 68-70*F (beer temp) to finish out. I think you'll like the result from that much better than the batch done in the 70's.
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Old 12-02-2013, 12:15 PM   #7
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Once the beer reaches FG,give it another week to clean up & settle out clear or slightly misty. some or all of any off flavors produced can be cleaned up...to a point. Bottle time can clean up a little as well. but not if the off flavors are fairly strong.

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Old 12-02-2013, 12:24 PM   #8
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Great comments above. I'd like to add that yeast being "happy" at a particular temperature is a bit misleading. Yeast will ferment quite well at warmer temperatures, the trouble is the flavors they produce. Fermenting cooler is not what the yeast prefer, it's what keeps them from producing too many off flavor compounds and fusel alcohol. I point this out because you may find that your 75 degree ferment producing a good brew, and ignore the advice to ferment cooler. This would be a mistake, as your brew could be even better fermented at the lower end of the yeast's temperature range...

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Old 12-02-2013, 01:57 PM   #9
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Yes, the above posters are all correct. Your yeast will certainly perform at that temperature, and your beer might even be fine. But you're right on the edge of producing off flavors.

You did the right thing with the water bath. If that doesn't work, if you have an AC, blast it, and keep your fermenter near it. I live in a second floor apartment, so my place get's hot. I did that w/ my AC, and was able to keep my beer at 62-64. Yes, my electric bill was higher, but you do what you've gotta do.

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Old 12-02-2013, 02:58 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
It may or it may not depending on how long it has been fermenting at that temperature. Off flavors from fermenting too warm happen early in the fermenting and cooling the beer after they are produced won't make them go away. You need to start your beer fermenting at the lower end of the range and when the ferment slows you can let it warm up without off flavors developing.
Good info in this post. While I understand the urge to get the temps down, I wouldn't go too crazy. Whatever damage that may have occurred is already done. What you want now is for the yeast to stay active and clean up their mess. If you're at or near FG, and you chill the beer too quickly (which is easier to do with a small batch), you risk dropping the yeast out prematurely.

Honestly, I think the best thing to do would be to keep it where it's at. Give it a taste in a week or two. If you're happy, bottle it; if not, keep waiting a bit.
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