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Old 05-02-2014, 01:44 PM   #31
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To each his own.



I bottled a BOS winning lager in 9 days, 500+ entry comp.

How on Earth did you brew a lager in nine days? I was under the impression that a lager requires different fermentation temperature stages that take much longer.

My only lager so far was still actively fermenting at nine days, and yes, I did pitch enough yeast.


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Old 05-02-2014, 02:18 PM   #32
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Proper pitch, temperature control. There is nothing different about a lager fermentation compared to an ale aside from lower temps and higher pitch rate.

To be fair, it did take about 10 days to drop clear in the fridge, so I guess that's lagering. The beer was only a couple weeks old when I entered it. It also went to the second round in the HBT competition, 2009 I believe it was.

It's not that hard to do, I don't understand why there has to be a compromise. My Son of fermentation chiller cost $50 to build, including the STC-1000 controller.

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Old 05-02-2014, 02:49 PM   #33
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If you think about it, the yeast can't be doing anything if they are flocculating.
Why not?

Flocculating doesn't mean "falling out of solution." Flocculation simply means the yeast sticks to things - usually other yeast cells where, once the "snowball" gets big enough, they'll fall to the bottom. Higher-flocculating yeast clump together more readily, causing the beer to clear faster. But they also stick to CO2 bubbles, which causes them to rise to the top during active fermentation.

But they can be working during this whole time. The fact that they're sticking together doesn't mean they've given up metabolizing sugars.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:59 PM   #34
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Respectfully, I've been brewing 8 years, BJCP judge, multiple medals.

This site has turned into one pissing contest after another. I can't give any advice without somebody lecturing me about basic brewing concepts.

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Old 05-02-2014, 03:28 PM   #35
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The fact that they're sticking together doesn't mean they've given up metabolizing sugars.
From Wyeast website . . .
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Flocculation:

Flocculation refers to the ability of yeast to aggregate and form large flocs and then drop out of suspension. The definition of flocculation is, “reversible, asexual and calcium dependent process by which cells adhere to form flocs.”

It is very important to understand the basics of flocculation and what affects it because the flocculation and sedimentation process is the easiest and least expensive way to get bright beer. Flocculation also effects fermentation performance and beer flavor. Ideally, yeast will stay non-flocculent and in suspension until the desired final gravity is reached and then become flocculent and drop out of solution. As any brewer knows, yeast do not always cooperate with this concept.
In other words, yeast doesn’t normally flocculate until the sugar is gone. If it's not gone and they floc it's because you've got stalled fermentation and they're not metabolizing the remaining sugar.
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