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Old 03-18-2013, 12:35 PM   #1
spybrew
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Default Fermentation issues or not.

Hi guys im on my 2nd batch and i previously made a coopers lager which is still maturing in the bottles.
As im new i am worried for my new batch as i used coopers heritage lager this time and used coopers light malt extract liquid opposed to powder in the prvious one. I also made a hop tea using saaz hops and came with a bag which i put it in boiling water in a mug for 10 mins as instructions require and then dump in primary with the bag before pitching.
My concearn is that previously i fermented round 75 which is what instructions required as it was ale yeast. However this batch i read has half ale half lager yeast and decided to ferment at 65. The instruction reccomend i ferment at 75 to 82 though it says this yeast can survive as low as 56. I have not seen the same fermentation or as vigorous as the previous one and there is not much foam created as the previous though there is a krauzen ring formed in the fermenter. I am worried if its fermenting or is possible its stuck as i have noticed no difference after 4days. Did i do the right thing to ferment lower than the instruction require but within the limits of the yeast.what could be the reason why not so much action is happening as the first batch and its been already 4days.
Thanks for any help guys much appreciated.
I find this forum very helpful,will definately stick here thanks to all of you guys for help.

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Old 03-18-2013, 01:26 PM   #2
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You are most likely fine. Is 65 room temperature? If so you are probably right around 70-72 anyways. Only way to be 100% sure if your fermentation is stuck is to take hydrometer readings. It sounds as though you are good though since you have seen signs of fermentation. Don't worry too much, but you really should have a hydrometer and use it if you are concerned.

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Old 03-18-2013, 02:16 PM   #3
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Ya you need a hydrometer to know for sure. There cheap online so next order i would pick one up http://www.austinhomebrew.com/index.php?cPath=178_67_64 heres a good reliable company with fairly cheap shipping. Also i have often noticed when fermenting at lower temps that it doesn't seem to be as vigorous fermentation. This is nothing to worry about the beer is fermenting fine. And with lower temps your beer will surely taste better. I ferment all my ales in the 62-64 range. If you have a brew shop near you go buy a hydrometer soon. If you don't have one order it online. Don't worry your beer will be fine in the primary fermenter for a while i go 3-4 weeks all the time. The longer primary has seemed to make my beer taste better.

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Old 03-18-2013, 02:29 PM   #4
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I'm concerned. Fermenting ales in the mid 70s is way too hot with the exception of a few styles. I think 60-65 is a much better range for most styles. The reason your first batch was more vigorous can be many, but typically the higher the temp, the faster the yeast work and more active fermentation will be. This comes at the cost of ester production and off flavors.

I would highly question your kits instructions if they are recommending ferm temps in the mid 70s for a lager style (which really should be done in the 50s)

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Old 03-18-2013, 02:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocScott View Post
I'm concerned. Fermenting ales in the mid 70s is way too hot with the exception of a few styles. I think 60-65 is a much better range for most styles. The reason your first batch was more vigorous can be many, but typically the higher the temp, the faster the yeast work and more active fermentation will be. This comes at the cost of ester production and off flavors.

I would highly question your kits instructions if they are recommending ferm temps in the mid 70s for a lager style (which really should be done in the 50s)
I agree most of these kit instructions are just not good. I would never ferment a Ale at 70+ degrees. And when alot of these no boil kits say lager. They come with nothing more then a Ale yeast.
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Old 03-20-2013, 02:35 AM   #6
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thank you all guys very much for your help, i will go buy a hydrometer and hopefully everything will be fine.

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Old 03-20-2013, 04:26 AM   #7
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+1 on tossing those instructions. Sometimes they're so wrong or outdated it's beyond ridiculous.

What kind of yeast came with these kits? Most ale yeasts ferment well in the mid-60's. Some (like Nottingham) work great down into the 50's. Only a few give their best results above 70*F.
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:10 AM   #8
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I'd agree with others that the temp seems suspiciously high, unless maybe it was a belgian style and your were going for that banana and clove flavors. A hydrometer is good to have around, so I'd echo the recommendation to grab one when you get a chance, but if your airlock is still bubbling then its a pretty safe bet that the yeast are producing CO2 and your fermentationis still chugging along.

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