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Old 04-30-2013, 05:20 PM   #971
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bleme View Post
It's probably fine.
What yeast did you use?
What is your room temperature?
Do you know the fermentor's temperature?
I used Windsor yeast
Room temp is 72F
Fermenter is in a swamp cooler reading 66F
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Old 04-30-2013, 07:51 PM   #972
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I have to add my experience of stressing the yeast in certain beer styles. I am a fan of Bavarian wheats and one of the flavors you look for is the banana. If you get too much yeast and to hard and fast of a fermentation, it seems to me that you lose a lot of the banana character. Just my two cnts

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Old 04-30-2013, 08:40 PM   #973
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Default Gotta ask.

I have seen a lot of starter not starting threads now and I need some answers that I have not been able to find. Any help will be appreciated. Here is the set up. I have an all grain raspberry wheat scheduled for this week. I have several pints of washed American wheat. Last night I made the same starter I made when I made the original beer with my vial of yeast and I am not exactly worried but I am not having much luck with starters lately. Had to toss a belgian abbey yeast a while back after a week of nothing and a notable change in smell from beer to bread. Didn't want to risk a 5.5 gallon batch on a maybe yeast that could be infected. I saw no signs of fermentation then and I am seeing the same thing now. I do not have a stir plate so I swirl every time I pass it and I have two young kids and play stay at home dad so trust me I am passing this thing a lot. What I am seeing is a pretty decent amount of settling out with no signs of any fermentation. The reason I am concerned is this is my first washed yeast and it was washed about 6-8 months ago. It was kept in the back of the fridge in the bottom coldest section. Any thoughts aside from wait it out. I could possibly dump it into a grad cylinder tomorrow and maybe have enough to float a hydrometer in it. The initial gravity with my refractometer was 1.050. I keep reading people say that I should see a creamy look but I haven't seen an example and when I swirl it after it has settled it looks creamy to me so I don't know. Anyone got some pictures or something to help me out. Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance.

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Old 05-01-2013, 12:00 AM   #974
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I'm on my 4th batch of beer now - currently have a honey hef in primary fermentation. After the boil was over, I put the pot in an ice bath, but it took FOREVER to cool down. It took so long to cool down that my girlfriend and I decided to just go get something to eat while it was still in the ice bath. When we got back after eating, the temp was 65 - 70 degrees, so I think I overcooled it. I pitched anyway (Whitelabs American Hef), after aerating the cooled wort by whipping with a whisk. 24 hours later, the fermenter showed no activity whatsoever. I got worried, so I got a sanitized spoon and gently stirred the beer. The next morning (about 36 hrs after pitching), the airlock was going crazy! This is the first time I've had a delay (more than 6 hrs or so) before fermentation started. Was it because I over-chilled the wort before pitching?

Also, I am concerned about the length of time it took for my wort to cool (3 to 4 hrs between end of boil and pitching). This is by far the longest it has taken me too cool my wort down, and I'm wondering about the potential negative effects this may have on the final product. Any thoughts?

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Old 05-01-2013, 12:25 AM   #975
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I don't think you over chilled your wort at all. I always pitch at 60F-65F.

Whether that is too long to chill is debatable. Some (I) prefer to be chilled in 15 minutes, but plenty of people will leave the wort to cool on it's own, pitch the next day, and report good results.

I do have questions about your aeration process though. When I whisk, I am using an electric whisk on high speed for 5 full minutes. If you aren't getting that much oxygen in there, that is probably the easiest/cheapest way to improve your beer.

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Old 05-01-2013, 12:32 AM   #976
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You don't detail what your ice bath is like, but I use a big ice chest that holds my kettle with room all the way around. I fill the empty space with ice then pour salt on the ice and add water to the level of the wort. Whirlpool the wort and it is usually down to pitching temperature in 15 minutes.

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Old 05-01-2013, 12:52 AM   #977
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Well, I use a rubber trash can, taller than my fermenting bucket - I put a bunch of ice in there and then put the pot of cooling wort in, surrounding it with ice on the sides. I think my mistake this time was being preoccupied with other stuff - I didn't put enough water into the trash can along with the ice. I also did not swirl the wort to help speed up cooling. Next time I'll be more focused on the beer.

By the way, where does one get an electric whisk? I don't think I've ever seen one of those.

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Old 05-01-2013, 01:48 AM   #978
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benfactorial
By the way, where does one get an electric whisk? I don't think I've ever seen one of those.
Mine is similar to this one, but has 4 different attachments.

http://www.walmart.com/msharbor/ip/1...mweb:undefined
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Old 05-17-2013, 01:31 AM   #979
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I have an AG American Wheat in the primary that I cooked Sunday. I almost always use dry yeast lately. I ran into some delays with liquids in the past as well. I always chill within 15 to 20 minutes using a homemade wort chiller, but I used to icebath in the kitchen sink and I never had any off results. Heck, I even would just sit the brewkettle in the snow during the winter sometimes.

I wouldn't worry about a low pitching temp unless it it outrageously low. I mean, you can store dry yeast in the freezer and I can guarantee the WL you are using was stored under heavy refrigeration. It may slow the kickoff a bit, but it does not cancel the game.

I have pitched dry yeast into ales that were in the 50's in the past and they worked fine. I did not mean to chill them to that level, but all ended well.

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Old 06-04-2013, 01:46 PM   #980
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I'm at about 84 hours now and have no signs at all of fermentation. Should I repitch and if so should I do anything special before repitching?

The brew is an Imperial Stout and OG was 1.072 and I used WLP007 yeast. Vial sat out about 6 hours before pitching, I gave it a good shake and poured it on top and popped the lid on my fermenter... but nothing at all after 3 1/2 days.

EDIT: After posting I went back to read the thread, in hindsight it would have probably been helpful to do that before posting. Anyhow, I took a gravity reading and SG is at 1.035 now, which means I do have fermentation, but there are still zero visible signs. Is there any reason to care if there are no visible signs as long as it's happening?

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