Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Fermentation can take 24 to 72 hrs to show visible signs.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-29-2013, 08:38 PM   #871
Stankonia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 177
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I brewed Sunday and am fermenting in a 5gal sanke with the sanke fermenter kit. I was worried Monday night when I got home from work and there were no bubbles..but I woke up this morning and opened the chest freezer that I'm fermenting in and got a face (and lungs) full of CO2. There has got to be a leak/bad seal some where. I had a little trouble getting the tri-clamp fitting to seal with the top of the keg, so I'm guessing that's it. Didn't have a problem the first time I used it, but for now I just covered everything with some starsan'd tin foil

HOPEFULLY all is well

__________________
Stankonia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-29-2013, 08:43 PM   #872
nickmv
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Memphis
Posts: 748
Liked 58 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stankonia View Post
I brewed Sunday and am fermenting in a 5gal sanke with the sanke fermenter kit. I was worried Monday night when I got home from work and there were no bubbles..but I woke up this morning and opened the chest freezer that I'm fermenting in and got a face (and lungs) full of CO2. There has got to be a leak/bad seal some where. I had a little trouble getting the tri-clamp fitting to seal with the top of the keg, so I'm guessing that's it. Didn't have a problem the first time I used it, but for now I just covered everything with some starsan'd tin foil

HOPEFULLY all is well
Wait, why do you say there has to be a leak somewhere? The CO2 has to go somewhere. That somewhere is the freezer you're fermenting it in.

I open mine during fermentation and get face-fulls of CO2 all the time. That's completely normal. Otherwise the whole thing would explode in a massive bomb of glass, wort, yeast, etc. Where does your CO2 normally go?

Maybe I'm not reading this right.


Edit: are you saying that something's wrong because you smell CO2 but see no bubbles? I think THAT'S probably what you're getting at. In that case, don't worry about it. As long as it's sealed enough to keep air from getting in, you're fine. Keep in mind -- CO2 is more dense/heavy than air, so it will not rise out of the carboy or let air in, unless you really rouse it and F with it.
__________________

Primary(SS Brew Bucket):
Secondary:
On-Deck:
Kegged & Waiting: Burton IPA
ON TAP: Belgian Wit
2014 Beers So Far:
Belgian Wit | Burton IPA

nickmv is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-29-2013, 09:22 PM   #873
Stankonia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 177
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I have a blow off tube going into a growler filled with sanitizer..there hasn't been ANY bubbles from the blow off hose..but like I said, it's definitely producing CO2.

__________________
Stankonia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-29-2013, 09:31 PM   #874
nickmv
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Memphis
Posts: 748
Liked 58 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

My carboy caps dont seal completely tight half the time. Don't worry about it. As long as CO2 is coming out and is also in the carboy, air isn't getting in unless you leave the top completely off.

That's why they always say dont trust airlock activity.

__________________

Primary(SS Brew Bucket):
Secondary:
On-Deck:
Kegged & Waiting: Burton IPA
ON TAP: Belgian Wit
2014 Beers So Far:
Belgian Wit | Burton IPA

nickmv is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-03-2013, 06:10 PM   #875
homebrewnewb86
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Spring Hill, TN
Posts: 9
Likes Given: 7

Default

So... about the waiting 24-72 hours for signs of fermentation to begin. I thought that I had somehow killed my yeast. I added about 1 1/2 cups of wort to a sterile mason jar and added my room temp liquid yeast, shook vigorously.

This is my first non-kit brew, by the way.

I added more yeast after not seeing any signs of fermentation (same amount of liquid yeast). Will my finished product be okay? Should I ferment as normal, or should I adjust my fermentation time?

-thanks
Partial-Mash Newb

__________________
homebrewnewb86 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-04-2013, 12:49 AM   #876
MileHiBrewingSupplies
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Prescott, Arizona
Posts: 31
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Hey Newb. Assuming this is an ale, a "proper" fermentation should show signs of activity within no more than 12 hours (lagers may take a bit longer). By "proper" I mean you pitched enough yeast cells, the wort is at the right temperature, and you thoroughly aerated the wort. (If you do all those things, fermentation almost always begins promptly...within several hours.) So, if there's nothing happening by 24 hours, it's probably time to take some kind of action. If you pitched enough yeast, and the wort is a little cool (i.e. low 60's), try warming the wort to 70ish. If you did not aerate the wort, that's likely your problem, and you should do so right away. If you under-pitched, pitch more right away.

Sounds like you did re-pitch, right? So what has happened since you did that?

The act of re-pitching certainly wouldn't harm your beer...and it may save it. What may cause problems is the fact that it's been sitting so long without your yeast taking hold. But it is what it is, at this point, and re-pitching was a good step.

__________________

Brew Hard!

The Brewers at Mile Hi Brewing Supplies

MileHiBrewingSupplies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2013, 02:41 PM   #877
GenIke
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 437
Liked 50 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

I need some advice....

I brewed a porter extract kit on Saturday night. As of this morning (60 hours or so) I have not seen any fermentation activity at all. I have not checked the gravity yet but am almost sure i didn't miss anything. The kit uses danstar windsor yeast.

2 possible problems... I think I pitched the yeast when the wort was too warm, probably 90 degrees. Also, my ferm temp is slightly cooler than recommend~ 60 - 62 degrees.

What should I do?

__________________
GenIke is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2013, 02:52 PM   #878
MileHiBrewingSupplies
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Prescott, Arizona
Posts: 31
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Try warming up the fermenter to the high 60's and swirl (don't shake...) the fermenter. At this point, if it's not too much trouble, I'd pitch another packet of yeast, as well. And yes, pitching at 90 degrees is too high, and is likely to result in off-flavors (due to the yeast producing excessive amounts of by-products at that temp). It's also quite possible that the yeast was killed. So hurry down to your LHB store and get more yeast!

__________________

Brew Hard!

The Brewers at Mile Hi Brewing Supplies

MileHiBrewingSupplies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-05-2013, 06:05 PM   #879
KNOTSANE
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New Orleans, Louisiana
Posts: 198
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GenIke
I need some advice....

I brewed a porter extract kit on Saturday night. As of this morning (60 hours or so) I have not seen any fermentation activity at all. I have not checked the gravity yet but am almost sure i didn't miss anything. The kit uses danstar windsor yeast.

2 possible problems... I think I pitched the yeast when the wort was too warm, probably 90 degrees. Also, my ferm temp is slightly cooler than recommend~ 60 - 62 degrees.

What should I do?
Check gravity first. Then proceed with what milehi said if no fermentation took place.
__________________

"She occasionally visits the waxer and comes home looking all... inviting. But for the most part, her muff looks like she's got Macy Gray in a leglock..."-- ubermick

KNOTSANE is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 01:01 AM   #880
GenIke
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 437
Liked 50 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Update: I did have fermentation. It was just much less active than my first brewing experience. Only had about 2.5" of krausen ring but gravity dropped form 1.060 to 1.029 so I think everything is fine. I did throw in another pack of yeast since I already had re-hydrated it.

Different beer and different yeast I guess. Patience

__________________
GenIke is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Show off your beer signs! aekdbbop General Beer Discussion 10 07-18-2013 10:25 AM
No visible fermentation? hal simmons General Techniques 4 03-05-2012 04:55 PM
no visible fermentation? eatria Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 23 12-01-2011 04:10 PM
Does oxidation have visible signs? fotomatt1 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 10-06-2009 02:27 PM
No visible signs of yeast activity? msa8967 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 21 08-18-2009 12:59 AM