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Old 01-12-2013, 02:24 PM   #851
doubletapbrewing
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Will the way dry yeast was stored affect the time it takes for it to start fermenting? I kept my packet in the fridge for the most part but had it out for about a day after I received my kit and a few hours before I brewed.

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Old 01-14-2013, 11:46 PM   #852
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Originally Posted by Orfy View Post
Don't worry if your brew takes up to 3 days to show signs fermenting.
Especially if you used liquid yeast and didn't make a big starter and oxygenate.
It is also worth noting that no bubbles in the air lock does not mean it isn't fermenting.

If at 3 days nothing seems to of happened then take a gravity reading to make sure you haven't missed the fermentation.
It is preferable to have a brew start fermenting as soon as possible
If you follow correct and advised procedures then I say most brews see activity in 6 to 18 hours. If this doesn't happen then it doesn't mean you've done anything wrong. You may just not be seeing it or it's taking it's time.

It is quite common for new brewers to get worried after 24 hours to 48 hours.
They get told to wait and then realise that the advice was correct.

First brew, and worried - Home Brew Forums
Yea, as far as I know, there could be nothing wrong with a batch with no apparent activity after 3 days. However, as you say, it is better to have it started way sooner so no wild yeast of bacteria start fermenting before the brewing pitched yeast. Since, it´s impossible to keep every bacteria/and or/wild yeast away when cooling and poring wort into a fermenter when brewing at home.
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Old 01-15-2013, 02:25 AM   #853
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doubletapbrewing View Post
Will the way dry yeast was stored affect the time it takes for it to start fermenting? I kept my packet in the fridge for the most part but had it out for about a day after I received my kit and a few hours before I brewed.
Yes, to a certain extent. It's definitely a better idea to keep your dried yeast in a cool/cold dark place if you are storing for extended periods before using than to, as an extreme example, let it get exposed to direct sunlight and higher temperatures on multiple occasions. How much this will affect the lag period, or overall viability, I can't be sure.

I wouldn't have thought your example would be particularly detrimental to the yeast health as, when you think about it, the instructions often state that to re-hydrate the yeast you need to "pour the contents of the packet into water at about 100*f", so warm/hot room temps for a short length of time wouldn't really adversely affect the yeast condition, either.
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Old 01-18-2013, 03:55 PM   #854
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I panicked after 24 hours of no activity. So the first thing I did was jump on this forum, I knew the answer would be here. I started to look at this thread, started to look for a substitute yeast, (LBHS sold me last Londan Ale and it was expired). By the time I found what substitute yeast I was going to use, and read halfway through this thread, fermentation took off. So once again it holds true, RDWHAHB! It ended up taking about 36 hours before I noticed visible activity. Not ideal I suppose, but bubbling like crazy now. So if you are looking for advice on what to do with no signs of activity, just wait, it will come.

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Old 01-18-2013, 07:36 PM   #855
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Originally Posted by Mickeymoose View Post
I panicked after 24 hours of no activity. So the first thing I did was jump on this forum, I knew the answer would be here. I started to look at this thread, started to look for a substitute yeast, (LBHS sold me last Londan Ale and it was expired). By the time I found what substitute yeast I was going to use, and read halfway through this thread, fermentation took off. So once again it holds true, RDWHAHB! It ended up taking about 36 hours before I noticed visible activity. Not ideal I suppose, but bubbling like crazy now. So if you are looking for advice on what to do with no signs of activity, just wait, it will come.
Since joining this group RDWHAHB has become my all saving mantra, I would be a brewing ball of stress without it!
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Old 01-18-2013, 08:05 PM   #856
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I started my irish stout last night and no activity noted in my airlock yet. Got my fermenter down to 70degrees, and keepin it there. I have talked to a few people that have said that sometimes it will not even bubble... My last batch which was my first bubbled like crazy up until the last few days.. All of my wine is on a constant bubble.. Does it have something to do with the all grain recipe verses the extract I used last time? Thanks

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Old 01-19-2013, 02:44 PM   #857
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Probably not. Maybe your bucket isn't completely sealed. Perhaps your airlock wasn't inserted tight enough. Doesn't matter, I'm sure you'll still have beer.

I'm cold crashing an extract stout right now that had NO airlock activity the entire fermentation, but still fermented completely with lots of krausen residue on the sides of the bucket.

I have different airlock activity experiences with each batch, even among repeat brewings of the same recipe. Most of the time it has nothing to so with your ingredients, process, or yeast, but with just how airtight your primary fermenter is.

RDWHAHB.

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Old 01-20-2013, 06:04 PM   #858
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schokie View Post
Probably not. Maybe your bucket isn't completely sealed. Perhaps your airlock wasn't inserted tight enough. Doesn't matter, I'm sure you'll still have beer.

I'm cold crashing an extract stout right now that had NO airlock activity the entire fermentation, but still fermented completely with lots of krausen residue on the sides of the bucket.

I have different airlock activity experiences with each batch, even among repeat brewings of the same recipe. Most of the time it has nothing to so with your ingredients, process, or yeast, but with just how airtight your primary fermenter is.

RDWHAHB.
Exactly. My stout that I brewed a month or so ago had little airlock activity. A bubble once every few minutes, but that's it. The Boston Red I've got has no airlock activity whatsoever, but it's got a healthy krausen on top of the beer.

And it's only been one night, schokie. Check tomorrow for krausen, and take a gravity reading if you feel comfortable doing so.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:12 PM   #859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orfy View Post
Don't worry if your brew takes up to 3 days to show signs fermenting.
Especially if you used liquid yeast and didn't make a big starter and oxygenate.
It is also worth noting that no bubbles in the air lock does not mean it isn't fermenting.

If at 3 days nothing seems to of happened then take a gravity reading to make sure you haven't missed the fermentation.
It is preferable to have a brew start fermenting as soon as possible
If you follow correct and advised procedures then I say most brews see activity in 6 to 18 hours. If this doesn't happen then it doesn't mean you've done anything wrong. You may just not be seeing it or it's taking it's time.

It is quite common for new brewers to get worried after 24 hours to 48 hours.
They get told to wait and then realise that the advice was correct.

First brew, and worried - Home Brew Forums
O.K. so it has been almost 72 hours (about 68 to be exact) and nothing from the airlock yet. I know. I read that the airlock bubbles are worthless for the most part, but I am a newbie and can't understand logic...

This is my 2nd batch. 1st is about 10 days old. 1st batch is an American Pale Ale and took about 36-48 hours to start bubbling and it did quite heavy for about 4-5 days. This batch is a American Light Ale. They both used the same yeast. Danstar Nottingham Ale Yeast. Both were pitched about the same temp in the bucket (around 74) and stored at around 69 degrees. It got quite cold here in Chicago so the last 2 days the temp on the both batches dropped to around 65 but holding..

Should I open it up now a do a gravity reading and see or wait another day? Don't want to open and risk contamination unless I absolutely need to. I did a OG reading before I closed her up and it was 1.034.. The recomended Final gravity reading is 1.008-1.011..
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Old 01-22-2013, 11:19 PM   #860
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I would peek inside and see if you have krausen floating. My guess is that your bucket just doesn't seal well enough to need the airlock.

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