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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Fermentation can take 24 to 72 hrs to show visible signs.
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Old 10-18-2011, 03:46 AM   #601
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I'm wondering why it looks like such a thick layer of sediment in the bottom of the carboy.

Fermentables are basically the malts and sugars, that will be consumed by the yeast and turned into alcohol and CO2. Honey, maple syrup, pumpkin and various other fermentables are also possibilities for addition.

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Old 10-18-2011, 03:49 AM   #602
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Originally Posted by bcwray View Post
I let it hydrate for about 10 to 20 minutes. So cold water is better for the yeast? What do you mean by fermentables?
Fermentables would be a sugar source, whether malt, dextrose, or sucrose. I use a few tablespoons of table sugar in my hydration cup, but there are many here who suggest malts like dry malt extract, liquid malt extract, or a bit of a previous grain mash before the hops are added. This allows the yeast to wake up and start feeding, as well as a tiny bit of multiplying.

The best temperature should be between 70* and 90*. In theory. Depending on the yeast. Again, I'm not a purist, and seeing where you are from, it's a lot harder to ferment (and what I do is start a fermentation in the hydration cup) at 60* to 65* where ale yeasts are producing "off" flavors. Higher than 90*, you'll start killing yeast cells. I use colder water only because I'm a little paranoid about it. Also, if the water is too cold, it can warm up, and the yeast will not rouse until a certain temperature is reached.

Using the setup I have, I've seen action within a few minutes of hydration -- that is, when I pour the yeast on top of a sugar solution at whatever the base temperature is of my water pipes. I've never measured that temperature, so I would estimate between 50* and 70*, depending on the season here in Ontario. Sometimes I only let it go for 30 minutes, the last time I "hydrated" for about 3 hours. For each, it still took me a day to see signs of fermentation.

Given that in your picture, I see no signs of krausen at all, and I see no signs of haze at all, I would assume that there is no fermentation. Granted, assume is a dangerous word, which is why I suggested wait another day. I would still get another yeast packet, and should 72 hours pass from first addition of yeast without any change, then I would use the other package of yeast. This time, *I* would just pour it into the carboy, without any hydration. No issue of temperatures over what the yeast can stand, and you'll have to open the carboy anyway to get the yeast in.
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Old 10-18-2011, 03:51 AM   #603
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogri View Post
I'm wondering why it looks like such a thick layer of sediment in the bottom of the carboy.
That is something I thought was a little odd, but I have had that much sediment from a BIAB setup a few times. It does happen.
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Old 10-18-2011, 01:46 PM   #604
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogri View Post
I'm wondering why it looks like such a thick layer of sediment in the bottom of the carboy.

Fermentables are basically the malts and sugars, that will be consumed by the yeast and turned into alcohol and CO2. Honey, maple syrup, pumpkin and various other fermentables are also possibilities for addition.
I didn't strain the hops. I read in several topics on this board that it didn't matter if you strain before fermenting. Correct me if I'm wrong, I have no idea about any of this.
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Old 10-18-2011, 02:16 PM   #605
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I have just brewed my first batch. I am concerned that the brew looks the same now (48 hours in) as it did when I shortly after I poured it into the carboy. I am concerned that maybe the yeast didnt work properly. I used dry yeast and was told to put it in a cup of 90 degree water before adding it to the carboy. A website I read said the yeast should foam up but it didnt. Is my batch ruined? should I throw some more yeast in? I have attached a photo. Please advise, very concerned.
The yeast should only have "foamed up" if there was any sugar in the water you rehydrated it in, that would be "proofing" the yeast. That sediment at the bottom of your carboy looks a LOT like a layer of yeast on the bottom. I would not be too worried about it, give it another day and then do a gravity reading see if its dropped.
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Old 10-25-2011, 12:58 PM   #606
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OK so I'm new to this, I have an amber rye bottled which went pretty smooth. I'm currently doing a spiced porter from austin homebrew. It's a liquid malt with the 1% abv boost. The first 24 hours showed no activity but today, approx 36 hours later, I can't keep water in the airlock of the carboy. The foam forces the water out and within 20 minutes or so there's a big trail of foam down the side of the carboy. I've lowered the ambient temperature to 65 in hopes to slow this process but I had to ask, this happened to anyone before? Is there anything I can do or just ride it out? Is this batch ruined since I can't keep the airlock sealed? You're help would be greatly appreciated!

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Old 10-25-2011, 01:11 PM   #607
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Originally Posted by speedymerlin
OK so I'm new to this, I have an amber rye bottled which went pretty smooth. I'm currently doing a spiced porter from austin homebrew. It's a liquid malt with the 1% abv boost. The first 24 hours showed no activity but today, approx 36 hours later, I can't keep water in the airlock of the carboy. The foam forces the water out and within 20 minutes or so there's a big trail of foam down the side of the carboy. I've lowered the ambient temperature to 65 in hopes to slow this process but I had to ask, this happened to anyone before? Is there anything I can do or just ride it out? Is this batch ruined since I can't keep the airlock sealed? You're help would be greatly appreciated!
Use a blowoff tube... And it happens all the time...
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Old 10-27-2011, 09:12 PM   #608
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I haven't had time to take a gravity reading (damn classes getting in the way of making beer) but I'm a bit concerned that the yeast didn't take in the most recent batch I did. It's been roughly 80 hrs and I haven't seen any activity in the airlock. Assuming when I get home that the gravity isn't where it should be how do I go about pitching more yeast?

Also, would it be problematic if I pitched a different yeast than I did before?

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Old 10-28-2011, 12:03 AM   #609
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Go back up to the top of this forum, read the stickies.

An airlock is not a measure of fermentation.

Repitching before you've taken a hydrometer reading is probably a waste of yeast.

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Old 10-28-2011, 03:45 AM   #610
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Go back up to the top of this forum, read the stickies.

An airlock is not a measure of fermentation.

Repitching before you've taken a hydrometer reading is probably a waste of yeast.
That's why I said "Assuming when I get home that the gravity isn't where it should be". The stickies are interesting and an immense help though, I've been reading a lot of them lately.

Anyway, I took a reading and it has moved a bit since the starting gravity (1.053) now it's (1.030). It looked active when I removed the lid to take the reading so I assume I should just wait and take another reading to see if it's going down?

Probably the common sense thing to do but my common sense is sometimes horrifically wrong.
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