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Old 06-18-2011, 03:50 PM   #541
bottomofthebarrel
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not sure if this has been asked but, does fermentation still take 24-72 hours to start even if you pitched a starter?

also, from what i'm reading here, the only way to know if you are fermenting is with a hyrdo reading.
but, i'm really in the camp of not poking and proding my beer constently.

all i want is for it to start so i can stop being nervous.

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Old 06-18-2011, 05:00 PM   #542
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bottomofthebarrel View Post
not sure if this has been asked but, does fermentation still take 24-72 hours to start even if you pitched a starter?
Not typically, but it's possible. It would be unusual for there to be a 72-hour delay if you pitched a good starter, however, since it can happen it still pays to be patient.

No need to check it repeatedly. If after three or four days you see no visible signs of activity, maybe five, take a reading. If you've got some movement in your gravity, even just a little, walk away from the beer. Come back in a couple of weeks. If none, then consider your next step.
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Old 06-22-2011, 12:33 PM   #543
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So I brewed my second batch of beer last Sunday. I ordered a kit from Austin Homebrew and it came with Wyeast London ESB 1968. Following their instructions, I let the yeast warm up for 12 hours, then smacked it 3 hours before I brewed. Everything went fine; my gravity ended up being 60, right on target (not surprising for an extract brew!). I went to pitch the yeast and it didn't look very inflated. This was my first time using liquid yeast so I wasn't sure how much it would actually balloon up, but the package said it's fine even if it doesn't fully inflate, so I pitched it.

48 hours passed, no airlock activity. I opened it up to check the gravity and I see no evidence of a krausen, absolutely nothing floating on the surface (doesn't ale yeast float?), and the gravity is still exactly 60. Does the lack of floating yeast indicate that it was bad, or does it not float until it starts working?

I didn't even think to make a starter since the package and the AHS instructions didn't make it sound like I needed to. I'll remember to in the future. Their instructions said to call if there's no activity after 48 hours so I'll call today when they open.

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Old 06-22-2011, 03:53 PM   #544
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Under what conditions can fermentation take 24 to 72 hours to show visible signs?

I made a 3 gallon batch of some brown ale (Palmer's grain bill) last night in my new 10-gallon cooler system. I directly pitched 1 cup of 4th generation 1084 sludge that I had been harvesting from, well, 3 different batches. 12 hours later, no visible signs of fermentation. Could it be that the sludge needs more time to dispense and acclimate? I only aerated through a fine mesh filter thing, I'm thinking this could be contributing to the long lag.

Any other thoughts? Are my thoughts on the right track?

Cheers!

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Old 06-23-2011, 11:06 PM   #545
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Not sure if this is a problem or not since this is my first brew.

Made my first batch monday night and pitched the yeast around 11:30pm
Woke up the next morning and had some activity in my air lock, when I cam home from work there was rapid bubbling tuesday afternoon.
Wednesday comes around and the bubbling began to slow, it is now thursday and my airlock is at almost a copmplete stand still.

Any thoughts? Is everything going ok? and could this be because I only have 4 gallons fermenting in a 5 gallon fermenter?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated since this is my first batch.

Recipe is brewers best American Pale Ale by the way.

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Old 06-24-2011, 01:33 AM   #546
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I've got a question on the opposite end of the spectrum; I pitched and saw normal results within twelve hours. I've got a temp controller on my fridge so I periodically peak on it when I get up in the morning and home after work. The first two days I had bubbles every five seconds or so. Day three it slowed to around ever fifteen seconds. Day four, I don't see any bubbles in the airlock (although I don't stand there and watch for several minutes at a time). My reason for concern is I'm using an Irish Ale yeast (Wyeast 1084) with ideal ferm temps ranging from 62-72 degrees. I'm trying to replicate another batch, and that one was kept around 60 degrees on average (a little low). I'm doing the same thing, but I don't want the fermentation to stall. What do you guys think? BTW, the first batch was a raging success.

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Old 06-24-2011, 01:40 AM   #547
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In response to "Motor City Brewer87": Dude, you sound exactly like me on my first batch: it was 4.25-4.5 gallons (I lost water in the boil and only had exactly five gallons on hand). I didn't know it at the time, but I think I was fermenting a little on the low end of the spectrum for my yeast strain. Do you happen to know the ideal ferm temp range for your yeast? My batch turned out spectacular after having the exact same airlock activity as you, so don't worry too much (tough not to worry I know). Also, I racked to secondary and witnessed a revival of airlock activity, which leads me to suspect that the yeast had a little life left for one last push. You may consider racking as well.

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Old 06-24-2011, 01:49 AM   #548
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once fermentation starts it is not uncommon for it to finish within just a few days. or for it to keep going for a long time. it depends on the yeast the temperature the recipe and probably a bunch of other things too.

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Old 06-25-2011, 08:15 PM   #549
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Recipe says to keep the temp around 64-72 which was close to impossible since its summer. My brew was about 74-78 the entire time. I don't have a secondary fermenter but I am going to be very patient and let my batch clear before I move to bottling even though the directions say to only let it sit 48 hours after the airlock is done bubbling. Thanks for the advice and can't wait to try my brew.

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Old 06-26-2011, 07:33 AM   #550
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I'm a little concerned. Brewed my first batch on Thursday night. I followed the directions exactly as the kit explained. 12 hours later the airlock was going crazy, about 30 bubbles a minute. By Saturday morning (about 36 hours after pitching) no activity at all. The fermenter is in a temp controlled fridge at 67 degrees. The beer is an Irish Red Ale. Any thoughts?????

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