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Old 03-28-2010, 10:48 PM   #371
songstre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wafox View Post
doing my first lager - pitched the yeast saturday afternoon. Pretty sure I under pitched for a lager (used 2 wyeast actavitor liquid packs for a 5 gal batch - no starter, did not "smack" it first either). Pitched it cold (50F), moved it to my lager fridge and set the temp to 50F

48 hours - nothing I was starting to get a bit worried (never had an ale lag this long before), started reading the forums found this thread and read the entire 37 pages. Also found a bunch of other posts about lagers taking longer to kick off. So I RDWHAHB and tried not to think about it. Trust the yeast.

60 hours - no change. I did another RDWHAHB even though it was well before noon - hey I felt better.

67 hours - ok time to pull a SG reading with the hydrometer. Go to the lager fridge open the door and what do ya know. The airlock is going steady and the krausen has formed. hydrometer reading shows fermentation is moving right along.

Had it not been for this thread I probably would of done something stupid.

so a big thank you to the OP and all the others that have chimed in. in 10 weeks or so if your around bend oregon look me up ;
Look, if there is ample fermentable sugars in your wort, and you're using fresh yeast, and you know what to do so that you don't kill the yeast, it's inevitable. It's science....
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Old 04-01-2010, 04:41 AM   #372
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Hello all,

I made my first batch Saturday night/early Sunday morning using a bucket and a recipe recommended by the owner of the local homebrew store. Everything went well until the grommet on the lid where the airlock attaches fell through into the wort as I tried to attach the airlock to the lid. I managed to MacGuyver a solution using Saran Wrap. OG was 1.043.

I saw no bubbling in the airlock all day Sunday, but figured that, if anything, it was a poor seal and to just let it sit. Monday, I awoke to find the airlock bubbling away happily. Yesterday, the pace picked up. I made a rough guess that it was bubbling at about 65 bubbles per minute. This morning, however, there was nothing. Same with this evening after work. Temp is 68 degrees and has remained so throughout.

I believe I'm correct to assume that fermentation will continue without many visible signs for several more days, and the only way to know when it's finished is to get a few consistent gravity readings. Which leads me to my question: when do I start taking those readings? Given the poor airlock, I'd prefer not to take any more readings than necessary.

Mahalo from Vermont.

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Old 04-02-2010, 04:27 AM   #373
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vtirish,
Give it at least 7 days in the primary then take a reading. take another reading about a day or so later to see if it stabilized (it stabilizes when you get the same reading a couple days in a row). I like to leave beer in the primary for about 14 to 15 days but you could rack to a secondary after about 7-8 to get your grommet back (if you do not have a secondary you can pick up a clean 5 gallon paint bucket at your local hardware store and sanitize it (make sure it has a 1 or 2 on the bottom in a triangle (that denotes food grade). Your lid should fit on it or buy a lid and drill a hole it to accept the grommet and air lock.
Your fermentation is still going but if you have a poor seal it may not show bubbles or you may have a good seal and it is simply not that active.
Whatever the outcome may be, because you saw those aggressive bubbles, fermentation did commence at one point and you wil still end up with beer. Enjoy!
PJB

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Old 04-02-2010, 04:54 PM   #374
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Quote:
Originally Posted by portjeffbrew View Post
vtirish,
Give it at least 7 days in the primary then take a reading. take another reading about a day or so later to see if it stabilized (it stabilizes when you get the same reading a couple days in a row). I like to leave beer in the primary for about 14 to 15 days but you could rack to a secondary after about 7-8 to get your grommet back (if you do not have a secondary you can pick up a clean 5 gallon paint bucket at your local hardware store and sanitize it (make sure it has a 1 or 2 on the bottom in a triangle (that denotes food grade). Your lid should fit on it or buy a lid and drill a hole it to accept the grommet and air lock.
Your fermentation is still going but if you have a poor seal it may not show bubbles or you may have a good seal and it is simply not that active.
Whatever the outcome may be, because you saw those aggressive bubbles, fermentation did commence at one point and you wil still end up with beer. Enjoy!
PJB
Thank you!
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Old 04-13-2010, 09:40 PM   #375
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On the other hand, contrary to popular belief, it's bad to rocket your fermentation off in 1-2 hours, either. There's a sweet spot that you should aim for in your cell count/pitching rate.

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Old 04-28-2010, 11:27 PM   #376
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Cool! I just brewed my 2nd ever batch this past Sunday and have this same situation. My first batch began bubbling about 48 hours later, but here I am at 72 and there's no sign of it.

So since I'm on the topic of my 2nd batch, I'll just share my experience with it here.

I'm using "Brewer's Best" recipe kits. First one was a German Oktoberfest. I followed the directions straight through and added the yeast directly from the packet to the wort after it had cooled and I had added the extra water to bring it up to 5 gallons. I saw bubbling after 2 days and it kept bubbling for a couple days after that. All was well. The beer turned out great.

Then I read through this website:
http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter1-1.html
...and learned about rehydrating the dried yeast. The Brewer's Best directions just say to add the yeast. I looked at the yeast packet of this 2nd batch, their Scottish Ale, and saw that sure enough, it did have instructions on the packet for rehydrating before adding it to the wort. The first packet wrapper is long gone and was a different brand/labeling of yeast, so I have no idea what that packet said, if anything. I followed the directions on the packet.

I also upgraded this 2nd batch to using a much larger brew pot. The first batch was close to overflowing in the smaller pot, so I was a it stingy on the heat that time. After adding the LME and the DME, I boiled it for a very long time just trying to get a nice, big rolling boil, but I got only a bit of churning at the surface. Maybe our gas stove just doesn't have the thrust. Anyway, so I added the hops, followed the timings, turned off the boil and let it cool. When it was close to temp, I rehydrated the yeast. It said to do it for 15 minutes and don't stir until afterwards.
Last time, I added straight tap water to the wort. This time I tried first boiling 2.5 gallons ahead of time and set it aside, then 2.5 gallons for making the wort. When I put the two together, I had ...only 4 gallons? I had lost a whole gallon of water into steam during the prolonged LME/DME boil! So I just went ahead and added an extra gallon of tap water (we are on a well, no city water chemicals) to the wort.

After 15 minutes, it did have some bubbling in the yeast, but the glob of yeast was mostly dry in the center. The water hadn't soaked through. So I mixed it just a touch to get all of the yeast wet and let it sit for another 15min. Then I stirred and added it to the wort. This time I stirred the wort quite a bit to get the yeast nice and mixed in. Last time I just swished the spoon around a couple times, thinking that it had a few weeks to mix itself.

So I didn't bother going into the basement for two days, this time. Here it is going over 72 hours and no sign of bubbling in the trap. I peeled off the bucket top to have a nosy. It smells like it's fermenting, so I think it will be alright, though I do like seeing that trapped getting a good workout. Maybe I somehow missed that part during those first two days???

If I did anything stupid, please point it out. I know I'm making too many changes in my process from one recipe to the next, but I'll get that hammered out in due time.

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Old 05-16-2010, 09:28 PM   #377
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I used to think that the lab training I got in bacteriology and the like when in college was my biggest asset in mastering homebrewing techniques. After reading some of the responses in this thread, I'm beginning to think that the photographic darkroom work I did when a lot younger was at least as important. When you're in total darkness and can't turn on a light, or have your hands in a changing bag and can't see what's going on inside, you learn that you must rely implicitly on the techniques you have learned that everything "inside the box" is going on the way it's supposed to.

Another version of this was something my Marine pilot father, who spent a lot of time flying between tiny Pacific islands during WWII, used to say: "Always trust your instruments."

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Old 05-29-2010, 09:41 PM   #378
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I just want to this thread, I also posted whining about no fermentation and then, two days later, poof I got a huge krausen and the whole thing went into high gear. So yeah, wait!

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Old 06-18-2010, 01:29 AM   #379
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it usually takes my brews at least 24 hrs to really get cooking. That being said, I brewed a batch of Hefeweizen today (my usual recipe). The only difference being I made a 500ml starter from a batch of WLP380 yeast I washed from a Dunkelweizen last week. Beer went into the fermentor at 1:00 pm and by 6:00 it was going at a bubble per second into the blow off.... I think I'll make starters from now on.

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Old 06-23-2010, 02:14 AM   #380
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So I didnt think I'd have to post to this thread ever. My 1st batch took off after 8hrs. My second batch (Belgian Pale w/ wyeast 3787 trappist HG) is at the 56hr mark with not even a hiccup or wisp of krausen. The smack pack got smacked, but never inflated... yeast was dated 3months ago... starting to worry... someone give me the obligatory "it will be okay, just wait" Thanks

edit: ambient temps 65-68...

Edit 2: Hehehe, upon closer inspection (flashlight into bucket and then lid open to take a peek) Looks as if there is a krausen starting to form and some seriously foul smells! Success! Thanks for the good vibes everyone

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