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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Fermentation can take 24 to 72 hrs to show visible signs.
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Old 11-03-2007, 07:30 PM   #1
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Default Fermentation can take 24 to 72 hrs to show visible signs.

Don't worry if your brew takes up to 3 days to show signs fermenting.
Especially if you used liquid yeast and didn't make a big starter and oxygenate.
It is also worth noting that no bubbles in the air lock does not mean it isn't fermenting.

If at 3 days nothing seems to of happened then take a gravity reading to make sure you haven't missed the fermentation.
It is preferable to have a brew start fermenting as soon as possible
If you follow correct and advised procedures then I say most brews see activity in 6 to 18 hours. If this doesn't happen then it doesn't mean you've done anything wrong. You may just not be seeing it or it's taking it's time.

It is quite common for new brewers to get worried after 24 hours to 48 hours.
They get told to wait and then realise that the advice was correct.

First brew, and worried - Home Brew Forums

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Old 11-24-2007, 01:41 AM   #2
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Great sticky, because it is a popular question.

I will say though, let's not advocate that thinking fermentation starting in more than 12 hours is a good thing. It isn't. Any longer than 12 hours and you are looking for trouble--infections, sub-par beer and quite frankly it is a bad brewing practice.

Let's stress this thread on doing starters, aerating and oxygenating, and fundamental brewing practices!

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Old 11-24-2007, 01:47 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude
Great sticky, because it is a popular question.

I will say though, let's not advocate that thinking fermentation starting in more than 12 hours is a good thing. It isn't. Any longer than 12 hours and you are looking for trouble--infections, sub-par beer and quite frankly it is a bad brewing practice.

Let's stress this thread on doing starters, aerating and oxygenating, and fundamental brewing practices!
On the other hand, contrary to popular belief, it's bad to rocket your fermentation off in 1-2 hours, either. There's a sweet spot that you should aim for in your cell count/pitching rate.
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Old 12-01-2007, 05:32 PM   #4
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Its been about 18 hours since I've pitched my first wort and still no bubbles. I realize that no bubbles doesn't necessarily mean no fermentation, and while I'm nervous, I'm not worried because I have faith in what you guys say. My question is whether an infection would prevent the yeast from working at all. because from what I've read, most infected beers at least make it to fermentation.

It took maybe 30 minutes for my wort to cool to about 80 degrees and it was uncovered and I poured it back and forth between my pot and my primary bucket a few times to try to get it to cool quicker. I didn't even realize I had to aerate the beer so I hope that accomplished it.

Also, I just put the dry yeast right on top of the beer and stirred it for abou 10 seconds. I did the Brewer's Best robust porter if yall need better reference.

The bathroom that I have my primary in smells like new plastic but kinda gassy. would that be a new bucket? or could that be fermentation?

All you guys rock by the way.

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Old 12-03-2007, 06:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PseudoChef
On the other hand, contrary to popular belief, it's bad to rocket your fermentation off in 1-2 hours, either. There's a sweet spot that you should aim for in your cell count/pitching rate.
What's the disadvantage here? Just curious because ever since I started pitching starters and aerating well, mine do rocket off in a couple hours.
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Old 12-03-2007, 06:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate
What's the disadvantage here? Just curious because ever since I started pitching starters and aerating well, mine do rocket off in a couple hours.
According to Palmer, taking off too quickly doesn't allow the yeast to take stock of what's expected of them. Kind of like they need to time to assess the situation before getting to work. He uses much more accurate wording though
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Old 12-05-2007, 12:45 AM   #7
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I have been using dry yeast the last 5 brews and I am anywhere between 12-15 hours each time. I am happy with that.

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Old 12-05-2007, 03:26 AM   #8
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Over three days (around 85 hrs) since i set the brew to ferment and still no bubbling, keep in mind I'm using a Mr.Beer that was stored in a closet by my brother for the last year. I will let it go the full 2 weeks anyway and hope for the best because i don't have a new brew to start and my next brew will be 5 gallons in a carboy.

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Old 12-05-2007, 07:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nate
What's the disadvantage here? Just curious because ever since I started pitching starters and aerating well, mine do rocket off in a couple hours.
Well, if there is too much yeast, they will not reproduce correctly, and you'll end up with dying yeast cells.

Also, lots of beer styles are yeast-dependent for their flavours: namely belgians, wits, hefes. If there is too much yeast, they are not going to be as stressed as a true fermentation, and many of these flavour profiles will be lost. The stress on the yeast is what contributes to these flavours, and you can actually change the profile by changing the stress level. You even want to purposefully "underpitch" styles like saison because you want as much yeast character as possible.
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Old 12-26-2007, 10:11 PM   #10
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Default Could I have missed the fermentation?

I brewed a partial mash dunkelweisen yesterday about 4:00 p.m. This was my first full boil as I just got my wort chiller ( worked greast ) I checked it this morning about 3:30 a.m. noticed my room temp was about 62 degrees and no activity turned up my space heater and went to work. When I got home at 3:00p.m. still no activity room was 68 degrees. Noticed a slight foam on top of the wort . ( when I siphoned the wort into my firmenter pail I kept filling a sanitised milk jug half full and shoock the hell out of it) also mixed well when pitching yeast(white labs hefenweizen) so I think my areation was o.k. I think I'm learning the importance of making a starter now! I will check it again this evening and take a gravity reading. If I need to repitch I will have to get more yeast tomorrow. How do I go about repitching ? Do I need to areate it again and what is the best methodeto areate 5 gallons in a pail ?

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