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DuffTheTaxidermist 11-26-2012 07:51 AM

ferment temp issues
 
alright so, ive got a situation, where searching didnt render me much of an answer so i hope i dont get jumped on but ill ask any way :P

i brewed my first batch ever last night. finally in the primary bucket at 2am. at about 3pm the air lock was bubbling like a mad man... im happy! but! my house is at a stable 62*f and the bucket is on a concrete floor in my laundry room. the house is on a slab. i put it right next to the furnace, about 2 ft away... im just worried its too cold to keep things going for the 7 to 10 day primary. will i be alright? i upped the house temp to 64*f but i cant go much more because my room mate keeps turning the damn thermostat down... (the house is freezing any way >.> ) i told him to knock it off if he wants good beer... should i be alright? or do i need to do something to keep the temp higher?

thanks for your time and info gang.

fogley 11-26-2012 07:56 AM

some yeasts vary in their optimum fermentation temps, but don't worry about it 64 will be perfect... i like to ferment in the lower 60s its up into the 70s that you will get esters and other undesirable off-flavors... Bubbling @ 12 hours means everything going well... go ahead and get it off the ground and be patient for your first homebrewed beer !

DuffTheTaxidermist 11-26-2012 08:45 AM

thanks fogley, ill see if i can get a crate or something from work to put it on, good suggestion. i appreciate the timely reply as well! :tank:

C-Rider 11-26-2012 09:31 AM

In the room it's 62 but in the bucket w/fermentation going on it could be 5* higher which is still OK. Keep it in the primary for at least 3 weeks, give the yeast a chance to really finish their work and settle to the bottom After 2 weeks check the FG and it it's the same for two checks you should be done. Don't rush, slow and easy is best. I do 3 weeks in primary and 3 weeks in bottle.

RM-MN 11-26-2012 11:27 AM

When the ferment slows down you could put the fermenter in a tub of warmer water (72 to 75 degrees) and try to keep this warmer. An aquarium heater would work good for this and it won't take nearly as much to keep the water bath in the tub warm as it would to heat up the whole house.

DuffTheTaxidermist 11-26-2012 05:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C-Rider (Post 4621402)
In the room it's 62 but in the bucket w/fermentation going on it could be 5* higher which is still OK. Keep it in the primary for at least 3 weeks, give the yeast a chance to really finish their work and settle to the bottom After 2 weeks check the FG and it it's the same for two checks you should be done. Don't rush, slow and easy is best. I do 3 weeks in primary and 3 weeks in bottle.

the recipe calls for 7 to 10 days in my primary bucket, and then 2 weeks in my glass carboy, and then another 7 to 10 days in the bottle... its a honeycomb amber... would deviating from the recipe do anything negative? i have no clue what will happen as im a virgin brewer.

unionrdr 11-26-2012 07:01 PM

The time tables in most instructions are a bit too fast as we've found here. Leave it in primary till it hits a stable FG. Then give it 3-7 days more to clean up & settle out clear or slightly misty. Then prime & bottle. Put the bottles in boxes &/or dark place for at least 3 weeks at 70F or better. Sometimes,even with pale ales,I've found 4 weeks can be better. Then at least a week in the fridge for chill haze to settle,if any. And get co2 into solution well. 2 weeks fridge time gives thicker head & longer lasting carbonation.

C-Rider 11-26-2012 07:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DuffTheTaxidermist (Post 4622452)
the recipe calls for 7 to 10 days in my primary bucket, and then 2 weeks in my glass carboy, and then another 7 to 10 days in the bottle... its a honeycomb amber... would deviating from the recipe do anything negative? i have no clue what will happen as im a virgin brewer.

Are you adding anything to the secondary? If not no need to move it as it's just another chance for an infection.

Kit sellers like you to move on fast so you'll buy another kit.

Here is some good info on bottling:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/bott...ebrewer-94812/

Hope this helps.

DuffTheTaxidermist 11-27-2012 12:25 AM

so, the only reason i would move to the carboy is to free up the primary fermentor? then i will most likely move it to the carboy, because id like to start a second batch of something different, right away. man there is so much to learn its almost over whelming... ive got alot of research. not even sure what the final gravity is... thats what im looking for next lol.

RM-MN 11-27-2012 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DuffTheTaxidermist (Post 4623808)
so, the only reason i would move to the carboy is to free up the primary fermentor? then i will most likely move it to the carboy, because id like to start a second batch of something different, right away. man there is so much to learn its almost over whelming... ive got alot of research. not even sure what the final gravity is... thats what im looking for next lol.

If you can spare about $15, buy another bucket fermenter and save the carboy for something else like a good apple cider or apfelwine or maybe even a mead.

I have 3 bucket fermenters and one carboy. I use all 3 buckets at times but in 4 years I've used the carboy 3 times. Waste of money that was.


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