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Old 04-28-2012, 03:18 AM   #11
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When you say "chemical" I am tending to think plastic/medicinal/bandaid/clove. This is likely caused by chlorinated water. It especially seems to take effect if you are doing all grain or even using steeping grains. But it also happens to all extract brews. If you are using tap water, I would highly suggest purchasing a water filter for your brewing water. You should be doing that anyway, to make the tastiest beers.



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Old 04-28-2012, 03:21 AM   #12
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To aerate you need to introduce a lot of oxygen. If you are using a bucket put the lid on, tip it up on its edge and shake the bejeebers out of it for a few minutes. You cannot over do it.

Don't do this after fermentation has begun. Oxygen at this point is bad.

You can stir in the yeast with a spoon but this will not aerate enough by itself. Also make sure you thoroughly sanitize anything that touches the beer after the boil.



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Old 04-28-2012, 03:24 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by titletowngirl View Post
I am brewing from kits.

I was stirring to aerate wort prior to pitching the yeast. Do I not need to do that?
What I do is, before pitching the yeast I cover the airlock hole on the fermenter (a piece of sanitized aluminum foil wrapped around the airlock stopper works well for this) pick up the bucket or carboy and shake the living hell out of the thing for a few minutes. It gets exhausting but it works well. After you've shaken until you can't shake anymore, remove the stopper, discard the foil and pitch your yeast directly ontop of your wort. If you want, you can give the fermenter a gentle swirl to help drop the yeast into solution but you don't necessarily have to. Even with ready-to-pitch dry yeast, I have had no problems simply sprinkling the yeast ontop of or the wort and not worrying about anything else.
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Old 04-28-2012, 03:31 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kh54s10
Don't do this after fermentation has begun. Oxygen at this point is bad.
Not completely true. I actually will usually oxygenate a second time when I start seeing activity. You just don't want to introduce oxygen when the yeast activity is winding down. And you don't want to try to oxygenate when it's at high krausen

WLP099 recommends it even

[quote ="Whitelabs"]
a. Aerate very heavily, 4 times as much as with a normal gravity beer. Less oxygen dissolves into solution at high gravity. Aerate intermittently during first 5 days of fermentation (30sec-1min).
[/quote]
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Old 04-28-2012, 03:35 AM   #15
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I've used both dry and liquid yeast.

Always used bottled water.

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Old 04-28-2012, 03:41 AM   #16
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Honestly, the simple answer here might well be that you still have "green beer". I just pulled the brewing instructions from Northern Brewer and this beer is a monster. A beer that is 8% ABV likely just needs more time to condition in the bottle. The bigger the beer, the longer it takes to age. I know that the NB instructions say to bottle condition for 2 weeks but that just seems way too short to me. Two weeks is about the minimal time you would want to bottle condition something about half the size of this beer. Its tough, but let it condition a bit longer. Open a new bottle once a week or so and take some tasting notes and see how the flavors change over time. I'm willing to bet anything that if you sit on this for another month it will have improved tenfold. Whatever you do... DON'T DUMP IT!!

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Old 04-28-2012, 04:04 AM   #17
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NBs instructions are notoriously poor. It says 2 weeks in the bottle before "enjoy!" whether it's a Mild or Lord Fatbottom.

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Old 04-28-2012, 05:20 AM   #18
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Fid thank you for the information, as I said I am also relatively new and have a lot to learn as well. OP best of luck I'm tapped out haha

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Old 04-28-2012, 05:43 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chinkson
I'm assuming your producing ales? How consistent are your temperature around your fermenters. From personal experience I think 3 weeks in the secondary is a lot of time, without the vigorous fermentation producing co2 to push out the oxygen, that's a long time to leave your beer in the secondary. Leaving it in the primary for 1wk-1mo then xfer to a secondary for a week max IMHO. This is just what I've discovered about my setups. Take it with a grain of salt I've only brewed 50gallons
Yea so this isn't right. the slight fermentation or CO2 release from the transfer to the secondary ( making the big assumption of a properly sized secondary with minimal headspace) will push out all of the air out of the headspace and replace it with CO2. As long as you keep the airlock in place and properly filled the cO2 can protect the beer for a long time.
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Old 04-28-2012, 05:55 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Draken

Yea so this isn't right. the slight fermentation or CO2 release from the transfer to the secondary ( making the big assumption of a properly sized secondary with minimal headspace) will push out all of the air out of the headspace and replace it with CO2. As long as you keep the airlock in place and properly filled the cO2 can protect the beer for a long time.
Already corrected by fid. Appreciate the info tho


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