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Old 04-21-2010, 05:31 PM   #891
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Originally Posted by Ato View Post
Here are the materials I used:
-2lbs Munich German Malt
-3lbs Bestmalz German Wheat Malt
-.25lbs Briess U.S. Chocolate Malt
-3lbs Plain Wheat DME
-.75oz Tettnanger pellet hops
-Wyeast Bavarian 3056 (I wanted to go with something a bit more nuteral then the hefeweizen)
You might have some problems with conversion of the partial mash. With such a high percentage of Munich, you might want a little base malt in there. Half of a pound of 6 row, or even 2 row would help that out.
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Old 04-21-2010, 06:37 PM   #892
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You might have some problems with conversion of the partial mash. With such a high percentage of Munich, you might want a little base malt in there. Half of a pound of 6 row, or even 2 row would help that out.
I disagree. The wheat malt alone is more than enough to convert everything, even if the munich didn't have enough diastatic power to convert itself, which it does.

I often do Munich/Wheat dunkelweizens and have even done some Munich SMaSH beers.
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Old 04-21-2010, 06:49 PM   #893
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I disagree. The wheat malt alone is more than enough to convert everything, even if the munich didn't have enough diastatic power to convert itself, which it does.

I often do Munich/Wheat dunkelweizens and have even done some Munich SMaSH beers.
"White wheat malt is the only one to have enough diastatic power to completely convert itself (130%). German wheat malt is really close at 95%, dark wheat is 10%, and Belgian wheat malt is 74% for the set of malt analyses that I looked at. It is suggested to "Use with a highly modified malt to insure diastatic enzymes. (http://www.foamrangers.com/malts.html)" though the same people list that common German Weizens are up to 70% wheat malt. Hope that helps.

Look at the malt analysis of the wheat malt you plan to use. If it is 100% or more it should convert itself in theory, though most things I see when I search around suggest using at least some base malt in the mash with high enzymatic power."

my LHBS only has red wheat (most common form). The suggested a little 6 row, but I did have 1lb of flakes and a little caramunich that needed help
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Old 04-21-2010, 06:50 PM   #894
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Do you know what the temperature of your mash was when you filled it to the brim? That might be your only issue...you want to fall within the 148-154°F range. It doesn't sound like you went under (or you might not get conversion), but if you went over, you may get some tannin flavor. PM is more forgiving than all-grain, tho, so no matter what you're probably fine.

Sounds like it went well.
I used a digital meat thermometer to maintain my temp in the 148-154 range. I'm not worried about conversion as the wort was sticky as hell when I was done with it. My only concern was that I got a few hot spikes when I was playing with the temp b/c I learned that if you submerge the thermometer all the way in and not just around half you get wildly different results. As much as I should probably get a glass one, I really liked how I could set the alarm to warn me if my temp was creeping too high up in the temp range.
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:07 PM   #895
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I found that floating the probe on top would be too cool while sinking it to the bottle would give me readings that were WAY to high. The happy medium seemed to be when I treated it just like meat and stabbed the grain bag and put the probe about half way down the shaft. The technique kept the probe standing up and seemed to maintain the 148-154 range well.

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Old 04-21-2010, 07:45 PM   #896
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"White wheat malt is the only one to have enough diastatic power to completely convert itself (130%). German wheat malt is really close at 95%, dark wheat is 10%, and Belgian wheat malt is 74% for the set of malt analyses that I looked at. It is suggested to "Use with a highly modified malt to insure diastatic enzymes. (http://www.foamrangers.com/malts.html)" though the same people list that common German Weizens are up to 70% wheat malt. Hope that helps.

Look at the malt analysis of the wheat malt you plan to use. If it is 100% or more it should convert itself in theory, though most things I see when I search around suggest using at least some base malt in the mash with high enzymatic power."

my LHBS only has red wheat (most common form). The suggested a little 6 row, but I did have 1lb of flakes and a little caramunich that needed help
You only need a diastatic power of about 35° Lintner to self-convert:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diastatic_power

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A malt with enough power to self-convert has a diastatic power near 35 °Lintner (94 °WK); the most active, so-called "hottest" malts currently available, American six-row pale barley malts, have a diastatic power of up to 160 °Lintner (544 °WK).
Regardless, I've used 70% wheat regularly with different types of munich and wheat and never had a single problem with conversion (except with raw grains, of course, then you need some extra diastatic power.

Check out the diastatic power of wheat from Briess. Both Red Wheat and White Wheat are equal to IF NOT GREATER THAN the diastatic power of 6-row:

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Pro...Base_Malts.htm

I don't have access to some of the other grain information right now, but I am best friends with one of the guys that work at my LHBS and he's shown me the charts for the german grains. They're very similar in regards to DP.

I guess what it comes down to is that the Foampage doesn't know what the hell they are talking about.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:20 PM   #897
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I guess what it comes down to is that the Foampage doesn't know what the hell they are talking about.

Oh man, this is really a huge pet peeve of mine. BeerSmith and all the other brewing software contains a lot of this unverified information. I find papers supporting the info on the Foampage site. I think we all know the you have correct info, as it "came from the horses mouth" or however that saying goes. Briess does indeed list the diastatic power of thier grains, and wheat is MORE than good enough to convert. However, half the time I get my grain from the LHBS, I don't know what maltster it came from. I looked into Muntons, and Weyermanns as those are the other bigger maltsters. Niether of them specifically list the diastatic power of the malts they sell (on their page), but they both sell a product called "diastatic wheat malt"

http://www.weyermann.de/eng/produkte...e=37&sprache=2

And they say to use it when needing extra diastatic power (which wouldnt be necessary with Briess' wheat)

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/31152823/Base-Malts-101

They say specifically domestic wheat might need help, and support the stupid idea that Aromatic malt has extra diastatic power @ 29 L. Thier references are all the major malting companies.

Aromatic
(Mildly Kilned) Used at rates of up to 10%, Aromatic malt will lend a distinct, almost exaggerated malt aroma and flavor to the finished Ales and Lagers. Aromatic malt also has a rich color and is high in diastatic power for aid in starch conversion. D/C Aromatic malt. As the name suggests, adds aromatics to a beer.


If that person is using Briess wheat malt, they will surely have not problem, but in most cases, is unknown. If DB hadn't had proper conversion, he would know it, so you most likely are OK, but don't forget, these values are the best case scenario. If you are mashing in with your temps all over the place, you might damage the amalyse enzymes, and not get the full conversion power of everything.

I am considering emailing all the maltsters and ask to get the specific info.

If I knew which malters I was getting malt from, it wouldn't be a problem, but I don't, but perhaps I should ask...
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:25 PM   #898
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If that person is using Briess wheat malt, they will surely have not problem, but in most cases, is unknown. If DB hadn't had proper conversion, he would know it, so you most likely are OK, but don't forget, these values are the best case scenario. If you are mashing in with your temps all over the place, you might damage the amalyse enzymes, and not get the full conversion power of everything.
Nah the temps weren't all over the place, it was more like a spike up to 160 for a few minutes and a drop to 144 for a few minutes each.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:35 PM   #899
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agenthucky, I would wager that you NEVER have to worry about malted wheat and that it will always have a high diastatic power...that's the point of malting, after all. The only exception would be if it was kilned, such as chocolate wheat or something.

Foampage actually references domestic wheat when they state the error. It's a very common misconception. I think it started when homebrewing was still a very small pastime and people were using unmalted wheat for their beers, so they had to mash with grains with high DP.

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Old 04-21-2010, 09:39 PM   #900
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Hey DB what do you think now that I provided a bit more info about brew day in my last few above posts, think my brew should be ok w/o too many tannins?

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